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March 25, 1953 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1953-03-25

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ILLITERATE AMERICA
See Page 4

L

Latest Deadline in the State

D7at3

i
CLOUDY AND COLDER

VOL. LXIII, No. I20 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 1953

SIX PAGES

Bohlen OK
Gets Support
Of Senators
Taft, Sparkman
Agree with Dulles
WASHINGTON - (') - Sen.
Taft (R-Ohio) and Sen. Spark-
man (D-Ala.) examined a secret
25-page FBI summary of an in-
vestigation of Charles E. (Chip)
Bohlen yesterday and said they
found nothing beyond what Sec-
retary of State Dulles had already
reported.
Sparkman told reporters after'
a three-hour review of the docu-
ment that he stood by his previous
support of Bohlen's nomination as
U.S. ambassador to Moscow.
** *
TAFT SAID he and Sparkman
were in general agreement. The
Ohio senator said, however, that
he preferred not to ,make any
statement until after reporting to
the Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee. He has been supporting
Bohlen since the outset of the
Senate controversy over the nomi-
nation.
Taft and Sparkman both de-
clared they found nothing in the
FBI summary that had not been
given to the committee in a re-
cent "evaluation" by Dulles.
Taft told newsmen he had re-
ceived assurances from FBI Di-
rector J. Edgar Hoover that Hoo-
ver was taking "full responsibili-
ty" that nothing of any conse-
quence was left out of the sum-
Inary.
The two senators were assigned
to investigate the multiple field
investigation reports after some
senators challenged Dulles' asser-
tion that the FBI files contained
nothing to disqualify Bohlen for
the key diplomatic post at Mos-
cow.
TAFT said Hoover assured him
that everything of a derogatory
nature in the FBI "raw" files was
contained in the summary. On the
strength of those assurances, he
did not ask to see the "raw" files.
He said he and Sparkman saw
all the information the FBI gave
to Dulles and to the State De-
partment's top security officer,
R. W. Scott McLeod.
Some senators had demanded
that the Senate committee call
McLeod for testimony on reports
that Dulles cleared Bohlen over
his own security chief's opposition.
McLeod was in a nearby office
on the fifth floor of the State De-
partment when Taft and Spark-
man read over the closely type-
written pages prepared by the
FBI. He was not asked to join
the group.
* s
TAFT SAID later, however, he
had received assurances from Mc-
Leod by telephone thatrMcLeod
had seen nothing more than was
t contained in the summary.
Sen. McCarthy (R-Wis), wo,
has been a leading figure in the
fight to block Bohlen's confirma-
tion, could not be reached imme-

Dowager Queen
C7.Q
Of England Dies
Death of Elizabeth's Grandmother
Told by Prime Minister Churchill
LONDON (P) - Queen Mary, the grand old lady of British royalty.
died last night at her London residence.
The 85-year-old grandmother of Queen Elizabeth II succumbed
after a prolonged battle with a gastric ailment. The official announce-
ment of her death was made by Prime Minister Churchill to.a hushed
House of Commons.
* * * *
QUEEN MARY, often called the "Grandmother of England," was
the widow of King George V, who died in 1936. Her long life spanned
the period from the imperial 19th Century days of Queen Victoria,

Democrats
Deny GOP

l
U.S. Charges
Fabrication'
"On Jet Attack
By The Associated Press
The United States charged Rus-
sia yesterday with "fabricating"
a story to cover up an "unwar-
ranted" attack by Soviet jets on
an American Air Force plane off
the coast of Siberia.I
Meanwhile, in England, Prime
Minister Churchill announced to
Commons that Britain, backed by
the United States and France, will
accept a Russian proposal to dis-
cuss measures designed to avoid
further air clashesiover Germany.
* * *
THE SOVIET offer was made
March 18, six days after an un-
armed British bomber was shot
down by Soviet jet fighters near
Hamburg, Seven British airmen
lost their lives.
A British Foreign Office
spokesman emphasized that the
United States and France will
be kept closely informed when
the discussions begin. No date or
place for the meetings has yet
been set.

through two world wars, to the
tense times of the atom bomb and
the cold war.
The end came peacefully.
Churchill sobbed as he an-
nounced in Commons that the
revered widow of one King and
mother of two other monarchs
had died at 10:20 p.m. (5:20
p.m., Ann Arbor time).
"I have with great regret to
make the announcement that'
Queen Mary has died while sleep-
ing peacefully," Churchill said.
* * *
THE 78-YEAR-OLD Churchill's
own political career began in the1
same Victorian era which sawj
Queen Mary's entrance into the
royal family through her marriage
to a son of the then Prince of
Wales.
Queen Elizabeth was notified
immediately at Buckingham
Palace of her grandmother's
death. The young Queen had
paid a bedside visit to her aged
grandmother only a few hours
before.
Queen Mary's oldest son, the
Duke of Windsor, who once
sat on the throne as Edward
VIII, had rushed from Florida
when his mother was first stricken
He was the first member of the
royal family to arrive at his moth-
er's residence, Marlborough House,
after her death.j

Accusations
Staebler Refutes
CIO Domination
By MIKE WOLFF
Charges that the CIO controls
Michigan's Democratic Party were
denied yesterday by Democratic
Central Committee chairman Neil
Staebler.
In answer to accusations by
John Feikens, chairman of the
Republican State Central Commit-
tee, that "there is no such thing
as a Democratic Party in Michi-
gan," Staebler said the CIO elects
only one third of the State con-
vention delegates.
*
THE ANN ARBOR Democrat
also attacked as "pure fiction" Re-
publican charges of violence dur-
ing the 1950 district conventions
in Wayne County.
He said that if the facts are
brought out in the April con-
gressionaluprobe, proposed by
Rep. Clare Hoffman (R-Mich),
tales of politics by baseball bat
would be shown false.
Prof. Samuel J. Eldersveld of,
the political science department
maintained charges of violent
seizure of the Democratic Party
by the CIO were nonsense.
PROF. ELDERSVELD said the
Democrats were protecting them-;
selves without violence against in-
filtration by "outsiders" and dis-.
contented elements of their par-
ty who exploited the fraudulent
ballot situation for which there
was no legal recourse at that time.1
In the fall of 1950 the courts
turned down Staebler's request

Schaadt Foresees
New Dormitory
Women's Residence May Be Built
Within Next Decade, Officials Say
A new residence hall, probably for women, will be constructed
on campus within the next four or five years, University officials
predicted last night.
At an Inter-House Council meeting, Manager of Service Enter-
prises Francis C. Shiel said that during the next 10 or 12 years the
University will build more dormitories. Leonard A. Schaadt, Business
Manager of residence halls, felt that construction would get under-
way within the next five years.
LATER, SHIEL pointed out that the University may not be able
to finance a new dormitory in

-Daly-Don Campbell
NEW OFFICERS-New executive council members of the Inter-
fraternity Council are (seated left to right) John Baity, '55,
executive vice president; Clifford A. Mitts, '54, president. Stand-
ing (left to right) Monte Marshall, '54, secretary; Sam Siporin,
'54, vice-president in charge of personnel, and Ken Cutler, '54BAd.,
treasurer.
Mitts Elected to IFC
PresidenCy in Close Vote

I

After an unusually long and
highly contested battle, Clifford
A. Mitts, '54, was elected next
year's Interfraternity Council pres-
ident by the House Presidents As-
sembly last night.
With four men running for the
presidency, the balloting went
four rounds. The third ballot re-
sulted in a tie between the two
remaining candidates, Mitts and
John Baity, '55.
ACCORDING to the IFC con-
stitution, the president is author-
ized to cast the deciding vote in
case of a tie. However, Pete Thorpe,
Korean Battle
On 'Old Baldy'

'53, IFC president, declined to
break the tie. He said he "prefered
to leave the decision up to the
Assembly."
Following Thorpe's refusal to
cast the deciding ballot, the As-
sembly passed a resolution to
have Thorpe express his prefer-
ence for the presidency. After
consulting with the present IFC
officers Thorpe game his recoim-
mendations to the Assembly. Iis
remarks were "off the record."
A fourth ballot was cast after
Thorpe spoke and Mitts emerged
the victor.
* * *
MITTS, who comes from Grand
Rapids, is an economics major.
He has been a member of the Stu-
dent Legislature and was IFC co-
rushing chairman this year. He is
affiliated with Sigma Chi frater-
nity

to withhold certification of del-
egates whose petitions could be
shown to be fraudulent.
Concern over convention vio-
lence centered around reports that
CIO workers were on hand in the
six congressional districts while
delegates' credentials were exam-
ined. It was charged that one

I
i
.
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The United States' "fabrication" . * "
charge rejected a Moscow version THE LORD chamberlin, the Earl
of the March 15 clash off Siberia, of Scarborough, will announce the1
latest in a series of aerial incidernts. length of court mourning as soon
# * * as Queen Elizabeth II decides the;
MOSCOW in a, note two days question.
ago asserted that the plane, a long-
range B-50 type craft which the Only then will it be known
Air Force described as a weath- whether Queen Mary's death will
er observation craft, deliberately delay Queen Elizabeth's sched-
crossed the Soviet frontier on the uled June 2 coronation.
Kamchatka Peninsula north of Ja-
pan. One of Queen Mary's last report- I
h h ld

The State Department re-
sponded with a statement term-
ing the Kremlin explanation "a
typical attempt by the Soviet
Government to avoid responsi-
bility for an unwarranted ac-
tion of its military personnel
through the device of fabricating
an unfounded version of the
affair."
Chrysler Makes
Retail Price Cuts

ea wisnes was that ner deatn woua
not induce Queen Elizabeth to
postpone the coronation. The re-
ported wish was without official
confirmation, but it would be en-
tirely in character. Queen Mary
always had been a stickler for self-
less devotion to duty by royalty,
and she helped instill this doc-
trine in her granddaughter as part
of the young Elizabeth's training
for queenhood.
No official offered any support
for the report, but the impression
prevailed in court circles that
Elizabeth would carry on with cor-
onation plans for the June 2
date. These plans now are far ad-
vanced and would be difficult to
change.

chairman maintained order with
a baseball bat in place of a gavel. ayes in F The defeated candidate Bai
was then elected to the position
Staebler said it was merely an of executive vice - president.
eight-inch kitchen utensil and SEOUL-('P}-A mighty battle Baity, who. has also served on
that no violence occurred. for Old Baldy still raged early to- SL, was this year's IFC scholar-
He added that he hoped the pro- day as Chinese Communists and ship chairman. He is a member
posed investigation would "also U. S. Seventh Division troops of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.
take in the General Motors side fought in a shroud of fog and Sam Siporin, '54, was elected
of the picture." clouds for the crest of the stra- vice-president in charge of person_
State Republicans, however, hit tegic bastion guarding the main nel administration. Siporin is the
Staebler's charge as "irresponsible invasion route into South Korea. present IFC publicity chairman
and preposterous." Both sides poured fresh troops and is affiliated with Tau Delta
He said Sunday he had not ar- into the massive struggle and both Phi fraternity.
rived at a date for the Detroit sides were taking tremendous cas- Ken Cutler, '54, and Monte{
hearings but that if they are held ualties. Marshall, '54, were elected by ac-
they will be either before or dur- Crashing artillery barrages andtr clamation to the positions of
ing the Easter vacation, April 3-13. the flow of battle across the shell treasurer and secretary. Cutler s
stripped crest of Old Baldy made a member of Delta Tau Delta, and
(, U' it impossible to estimate the toll Marshall is affiliated with Lambda
Orch str thre i th fist 6 hors f fght Chi Alpha.
'UJ' orhestra hen firsathsf h The newly elected officers will
ing. But officers at the front es- officially take over their duties
timated the Chinese had suffered ;pi 8
moo Prese t mre than 1,000 casualties in the Ap 2.
early fighting on the wings-at T-
Easter___usi Bone and Pork Chop Hills to the Detroiter M ay -G
' west of Old Baldy and at White

Red-Probe
Has Witness
Difficulties
WASHINGTON - (P) - Earl
Browder and two other antag-
nistic witnesses stormed at Sen.
McCarthy (R-Wis.) and his Sen-
ate investigations subcommittee
yesterday with cries of "book
burning" and other accusations.
All three refused to answer ques-
tions about alleged Communistic
activity at a televised public hear-
ing. They said their answers might
tend to incriminate them.
BROWDER, deposed chief of the
Communist party in the United
States, told McCarthy, "I have
good reason to believe that any-
thing I say would be used against
me."
Another witness, Sol 'Auer-
bach, better known by his pen
name of James S. Allen, lec-
tured the senators to the effect
that socialism was "inevitable"
in the United States.
When Allen was dismissed from
the witness stand, Sen. Mundt
(R-S.D.) commented that ques-
tioning him was like "trying to
pump water out of a very poison-
ous well."
It was William Marx Mandel, a
New York author. who accused the
senators of "book burning." His
attitude on the witness stand was
such that McCarthy asked a Cap-
itol policeman to stand by to main-
tain order if necessary.
, >F* Y
MANDEL shouted that McCar-
thy "murdered" Raymond Kaplan,
a Voice of America engineer kill-
ed by a truck in Cambridge, Mass.,
recently. Eyewitnesses said Kap-
lan threw himself in front of the
truck, and an official verdict of
suicide was pronounced.
Later a congressional source
who asked to remain anonymous
produced a purported suicide
note in whichwKaplan expressed
fear that he would be made the
scape-goat in the subcommit-
tee's investigation into alleged
waste in the Voice of America
program.
McCarthy said subcommittee in-
quiries after Kaplan's death show-
ed that he would have been a
friendly witness and had no rea-
son to fear the Senate probe. The
senator also. said Kaplan's co-
workers seriously doubted that his
death wa a suicide.
Yesterday's ruckus was stirred
up by the subcommittee's attempt
to find out why the State Depart-
ment has circulated abroad books
by Browder and other persons the
senators contend are Communists.
gy Pro
when they talk about community
apathy."
Problems may be lack of a ba-
sis for community action, poor or-
ganizational planning or prepara-
tion, bad timing, the wrong ap-
proach to social action or auto-
cratic leadership, Fathr Foley
pointed out.
He emphatically suggested
that groups who expect com-
munity following should clarify
their goals and approaches for
community benefit. "A confused
leader deserves a confused fol-
lowing," he noted.

five years.
The fact that the University
may not be able to finance a
new dormitory at the end of rive
years may account for the dif-
ference in time estimates, Shiel
pointed out.
Basis for the predictions are
predicted increases in female pop-
ulation on campus.

* * *

11

i
4
i

SHIEL EXPLAINED that final
authority for the building of a.
new residence hall rests with the
Regents, although a primary
recommendation may be made by
the Board of Governors for Resi-
dence Halls.
When asked whether the next
dormitory would be on the pro-
posed North Campus, Wilbur K.
Pierpont, University vice-presi-
dent, said that at present there
are no plans for unmarried stu-
dent dwellings in this area.
In addition to quad legislators,
residence hall house mothers and
quad residents attended the meet-
ing.
Shiel explained to the students
that any excess accrued in the op-
eration of the quads over the year
go toward paying off the bond
issue on the residence halls more
rapidly.
Shiel also told the men that the
quad budget for next year is built
on the same standards as exist to-
day and, therefore, there will prob-
ably be no increase in present quad
services.
He also promised the men that
next fall a history of the financing
of the residence halls together
with a breakdown of exactly how
the residence hall dollar is spent
will be made available to resi-
dents.
Four Czechs
Escape Reds
In Air Liner
FRANKFURT, Germany-(P)-
Four anti-Communist Czechs seiz-
ed a flying air liner at gunpoint
over Red Czechoslovakia Monday
night and flew it across the Iron
Curtain to freedom in West Ger-
many.
Three passengers and the pilot,
Miroslav Slovak, 24 years old, were
in on the plot to divert the plane
from its scheduled Prague-Brno
run.
-THE CO-PILOT, radio operator
and the other 23 passengers were
not.
But two of the latter seized
their chance and joined the
plotters in asking asylum as.po-
litical refugees after the silver-
hulled C47 landed at the U. S.
Air Force's Rhine-Main base
near Frankfurt.
The remainder elected to return
home. They probably will be hand-
ed back soon, along with the plane,
This was-the ninth time in four
years that Czechs have taken to
the air to escape the ring of death
the Communists have thrown
around Czechoslovakia's borders on
the ground.
**
THE FUGITIVES hedge-hopped
low across the border to escape
detection by Czech air patrols
which shot down an American
Thunderjet fighter two weeks ago.
But they didn't fool the U. S.
Air Force. Its European head-
quarters in Wiesbaden announc-

diately for comment on the Taft-

Sparkman report. -------
The Wisconsin senator was re- DETROIT-OP)-Chrysler Corp.
ported working on a speech blast- announced yesterday an across-
ing at the 48-year-old Bohlen on the-board price cut averaging $100
the Senate floor Wednesday. Ion all its passenger cars.

PIRANDELLO COMEDY:
Author's Philosophy Presented in Play
___________ * * *
By PAT ROELOFS
"Right You Are If You Think
You Are" is not only the title of J
Luigi Pirandello's play which will
open at 8 p.m. today in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater, but also
the summary of all of the author's
philosophy.
The provocative comedy will
continue its nightly run through
Saturday. *; *f y

Horse Mountain and Upper and
The University Symphony Orch- IHreMuti n pe n
The nivrsiy Syphoy Och-Lower Alligator Jaw to the north-
estra under the direction of Wayne t
Dunlap will present its first sprin' east.
concert at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in AP Correspondent Stan Carter
Hill Auditorium. reported from the front that'
The program will include Fres- Americans and Colombians of thea
cobaldi-Kindler's "Toccata" Hin- Seventh Division had taken heart-c
demith's "Symphony, Mathis der breaking losses.
Maler," "Concert of the Angel," As the second dawn broke overf
"The Entombment of Christ," and the battlefield, screaming shellsX
"The Temptation of Saint An- streaked the skies and crumped 1
thony." into the mud coating the bare r.
Also included in the performn- slopes and crest of Old Baldy. t
ane will be symphonic excepts Early morning fog and clouds ob-t
from "Le Martyre de Saint Sebas- scured the embattled height. f
tian" by Debussy and Rimsky-
Korsakoff's "The Russian Easter CAPUS SURVEY:
"u

iAmbassacor oS t
WASHINGTON--(P)-Fred Al-
ger, Detroit banker,,was reported
under consideration yesterday as
a possible appointee as Ambassa-
dor to Belgium.
Administration officials said that
Alger was among a number of
persons being considered for dip-
omatic posts. Although Alger was
nentioned specifically in connec-
tion with Belgium, officials said
that another post might be of-
fered him,

ALL OF THE Italian play-
wright's works are based on his
belief that "for all essential pur-
poses, what men believe to be true
is of more importance in guid-
ing their actions than what is
actually true."
The skillful Pirandello, how-
ever, has managed to produce a
different plot for each play he
has written.
"Right You Are If You Think

Overture."
With the exception of "Toccat-t,"
the entire program will 1e based
on an Easter theme.
The concert, sponsored by the
University School of Music will be
open to the "general public free
of charge.
[Jnemploymeii t
Bill lPasses House
LANSING - UP) - Republicaris
pushed through the House vei-
terday a bill to extend unemplov-
ment benefits to 26 weeks and re-
vise employer contributions to the
fund.
But Democrats opposed the bill,
hblcked immediate effect a'Ad hint-

(EDITOI'S NOrE: This is the last
in a series of articles based on a
Daily survey of membership trends in
campus organizations.)
By VIRGINIA VOSS
Cures for the partidular type of
lethargy currently dragging down
the membership of certain campus
organizations are anything but
self-evident.

Organization, the three-month
old group has tentatively out-
lined its course to include more
work through personal invita-
tions, an expanded activities or-
ientation program for freshmen
and an extention of Student
Legislature's leadership training
program.
Working to smooth out the same

Solutions for 'U Lethar4

The concensus of opinion is that program of over-organization, an
the best student organizations can SL-appointed Committee to Study
do to solve their dilemma is to Campus Organizations is current-
accept discouraging sociological ly re-evaluating the campus set-up
trends and work within this frame- in terms of eliminating jurisdic-
work to improve personnel rela- tional conflicts and bettering stu-

"*YAM
"MICE, ; *--,

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