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March 24, 1953 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1953-03-24

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PAGE STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 1953

I

'U' EXPERIMENTS ON RODENTS:
Tests Show Gamblers, Rats Similar

By FRAN SHELDON

4

s . * *

, Although there is little basis for
the belief that gamblers are all
rats, psychological tests being car-
ried on in a University laboratory
indicate fundamentally the two
may have a lot in common.
Prof. Edward L. Walker of the
psychology department, in a study
of alternation phenomena in the
four-footed rodents has been able
to draw an analogy between the
action of rats when placed in a
planned situation and the action
of gamblers in a "tight spot."
* * *
BY PLACING the animals in
the foot of a T-shaped run, and
providing some stimulus to start
them running, Walker has demon-
strated the animals, for no ap-
parent reason, will tend to run on
a second trial in the opposite direc-
tion from the one they took on the
first.
This. tendency, he explained,
is due to the inevitable effect the
first trial has on the "attitude"
of the animal toward the second.
If it had no effect on the animal
at all there would be equal chance
he would run in either direction.
This has been disproved in prac-
tice, and it has been further dem-
onstrated the action of most rats
falls into the same set pattern, he
said.
TAKEN OUT of its setting, Wal-
ker showed how this tendency to
alternate is analogous to the little
publicized gamblers' fallacy, upon
which all the better gambling es-
tablishments depend for their pro-
fits.
This fallacy, he explained,
causes gamblers to be misled by
sequence. For example, a gamb-
ler betting on the fall of a coin
knows on the first throw there

Coif Selects
Law School
Members
The.-following persons, by virtue
of the excellence of their Law
School records, have been elected
members of the Order of the Coif:
William A. Bain, Jr., William E.
Beringer, R. O. Blatti, Alfred W.
Blumrosen, F. M. Bowen, Jr.,
George V. Burbach, James W. Cal-
lison, William K. Davenport, Wal-
ter G. Flickinger, Charles R. Gib-
son, F. D. Goldstein, Lois H. Ham-
bro, John B. Houck, Robert A.
Howes, Richard P. Matsch.
The list continues with: George
D. Miller, Jr., S. A. Newblatt, Dun-
can L. Noble, Barbara A. Petrie,
Thomas A. Roach, Richard D.
Rohr, Marcus A. Rowden, D., W.
Rowlinson, Robert G. Russell,
John S. Slavens, John F. Spindler,
Arthur L. Stashower, James S.
Taylor.
COIF, the Law School honorary
comparable to Phi Beta Kappa,
can trace its history back farther
than the legal system as we know
it today.
The present order originated
with the English order of the
Coif.
Consisting of a small number
of lawyers, Coif was kept up by a
system of apprenticeship corres-
ponding to present day legal
training. It was from these ranksj
new members were selected.
THE AMERICAN Order of the!
Coif is the outgrowth of an earlier
society, Theta Kappa Nu.
In addition to a single honor-j
ary membership granted to some
person who has attained distinc-
tion in the legal profession, an-
nual membership is restricted to
the top ten percent of each grad-
uating class.
Originally all members were re-j
quired to wear a tight fitting cap
called a coif. This coif was the ba-
sis for the society's name. The cap
itself, however, became cumber-
some with the advent of legal
wigs, and an engraved key has
taken its place as the insignia of
membership.I

RELATES TO MAN'S AFFAIRS:
Human Biology Institute
Studies Heredity in Mice

By PHYLLIS WILLAR
A large-eared, hearty, brown
genus of mice has been the subject
of many years of research which
is now being carried on at the In-
stitute of Human Biology, situated
in the back of a courtyard on East
Catherine St.
The genus, Peromyscus, has
figured largely in the experiments
on the heredity of racial charac-
teristics which Prof. Lee R. Dice.
director of the Institute, has been
carrying on since 1925. He began
his studies in the Laboratory of
Mammalian Genetics which ex-
panded into what has been the
Institute of Human Biology for
three years.
THE INSTITUTE now includes
the Heredity Clinic, the Biogeog-
raphy Section, the Community
Dynamics Section, and the Lab-
oratory of Vertebrate Biology in
which Prof. Dice is studying his
native American mice.
All the research is combined
into as effort to discover fun-
damental principles of biology
which can be related back to hu-
man affairs.
The study of the reactions which
Peromyscus has to certain experi-
ments can lead Prof. Dice and his
associates to predict what other
animals will do in similar situa-
tions. This can then lead to pre-
dictions on human habits.
IN THE HEREDITY Clinic, re-
search is trying to establish what
diseases are hereditary, the effects
of atomic radiation in producing
mutations in man, and the pos-
Beetiouen Sonatas
Subject of Talk
Prof Joseph Brinkman of the
School of Music will talk on "The
Late Sonatas of Beethoven" at
4:15 p.m. today in Aud. A, Angell
Hall.
The lecture is sponsored by the
School of Music and open to the
public.

1 ________ ______

sibilities of inheritance of men-
tal diseases.
The Biogeography section is di-
recting its, investigations primar-
ily toward analysing the geograph-
ic distribution of reptiles and am-
phibians. The idea is to find out
information through these two
groups about the movement and
distribution of other fauna, now
extinct. Located in the Museums
Building, the Biogeography sec-
tion study is being done under the
direction of Prof. L. C. Stuart of
the zoology department.
The Community Dynamics
study is concentrating its in-
terest in relating natural com-
munities of animals to the
principles and techniques in-
volved in human communities.
In addition to the different de-
partments of the Institute, sep-
arate studies are being carried on,
including an assortative mating
study and study of heredity abili-
ties. The latter study is interested
in a possible correlation between
mental abilities and physical,
traits.
Union To Open
Secretariat
Small campus organizations
may, beginning today, take ad-
vantage of the Union's typing,
mimeographing and postcard mim-
eographing facilities under the
Union's new secretariat service.
Arranging a time and procur-
ring stencils for mimeographing
may be done by contacting the of-
fice manager in the student of-
fices.between 3 and 5 p.m. any day
during the week.
The student offices will be open
from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays, Wed-
nesdays and Thursdays. The pro-
ject will be run at cost and will
be handled through the disperse-
ment authorization sheet system
of the office of Student Affairs.

International
Jobs Talk Set
Summer projects in Interna-
tional student relations will be
discussed by Barbara Grant, col-
lege secretary for the American
Friends service committee during a
three day stay in Ann Arbor.
Miss Grant will arrive in Ann
Arbor today and will meet with
students at 5 p.m. atthe Congre-
gational Guild House. She will re-
main in Ann Arbor until Friday.
International seminars, student
work camps across the United
States, and trips to Europe and
Japan are planned for this sum-
mer. Students wishing to make ar-
rangements through the Friends
can make appointments to see Miss
Grant by calling Lane Hall.
Olson Tells Rotary
of ParisMeeting
Four hundred Rotarians and
their wives from southern Michi-
gan and western Ontario heard
Dean Willard C. Olson of the ed-
ucation school report Sunday in
the Union on a recent UNESCO
conference in Paris, to which he
was North American delegate.
Willard told the group "broad"
education, such as we have in this
country and Canada will prevent
countries from "stagnating," and
indicated that in some European
countries, social and economic
forces were opposed to "broad"
education.

Stern To Lecture
On Japanese Art
"The Traveling Exhibition of
Japan's Art Treasures" will be dis-
cussed at 8 p.m. tonight in Rack-
ham Amphitheater by Harold P.
Stern, assistant in Japanese Art
at the Freer Gallery of Art in
Washington, D. C.

i, 0 0
l \

f

-Daily-Larry Wilk
GAMBLING: JUST A RAT-RAGE?
* * * 4., * * *

_i

is a 50-50 chance the coin will
fall head up.
However, Walker continued, if
the coin falls heads up several
times in a row the tendency of
the gambler is to become more cer-
tain it will now fall tails, and bet
on this alternative despite the factf
that each individual throw still has
equal chance to fall either way.
* * *
ACTUALLY, although the prob-
ability of a coin falling the same
way ten times in a row is one in
a thousand, the possibility of the
eleventh try falling the same way
is still 50-50, he pointed out.

Gamblers (and rats), Walker
explained, are affected by the out-
come of previous trials until their
reasoning is influenced and they
have a distorted picture of the
circumstances.
He said the reasons behind this
tendency toward alternation are
not as yet completely understood
either in the rats or in the gamb-
lers, but pointed out considerable
use is made of it, and to obvious
profit, in gambling establishments
where the machines are not "fix-
ed."
Public Health

-a

lam

I

iiia

Meetino Slated
The University School of Pub-
lic Health will be the site of the
Citizen's Public Health Confer-
ence to be held tomorrow and
Thursday.
Discussing public health needs
in Michigan will be State health
:he popular patterns in Sterling. committees from both the House'
and Senate. They will attend the
terling and Plated Novelties open meeting at which the audi-
ence will participate.
Glassware Approximately 250 persons are
expected to attend the meeting,
LE R'S JtE W1ELERwhich is being held to get slants
on what various persons are think-
308 South State Street ing concerning public health and
to coordinate these thoughts into
effective practices.
TO GRADUATES IN

Rehearsals stretch out,
for the big Glee Club
tour is ahead. Work and worry call
for a pause-so, relax ...
refresh with ice-cold Coke.
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
ANN ARBOR COCOA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
"Coke" is a registered trade-mark. C 1953, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

Genuine
White Buck
Phi BPates
Popular collegiate
choice - white Buck.
They're Phi Bates -
the only shoes to earn
the prized style en-
dorsement of the
:j f3: College Advisory
x.. Board. Head of the
class for value!
.
E,.' . ,tom fm -
No 4Genuine Buckskin Nr; 7+'
$7295
"SLIPPER-FREE WHERE
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WILD'S S
!tole Street 00 the CampuS

Hop Home
ThisEaster
BYTRAINI1

YOU WON'T NEED A RABBIT'S FOOT
to be sure of getting home
as planned ... and getting
back promptly after vaca-
tion...in a comfortable, de-
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equally sure of vacation fun...
traveling with your friends...
enjoying swell dining-car meals
..with lots of room to roam
around and visit.
GIVE EAR TO THESE SAVINGS!
You and two or more of
your friends can each
-" save 25% of regular
round-trip coach fares
by making the trip home and
back together on Group Plan
tickets. These tickets are good
generally between points more
than 100 miles apart.
Or, gather 25 or more head-
*ing home at the same time in
the same direction. You each
save up to 28%/', even if you re-
turn separately.
CONSULT YOUR LOCAL RAILROAD TICKET
AGENT WELL IN ADVANCE OF DEPARTURE
DATE FOR DETAILED INFORMATION
EASTERN
RAI LROADS

I ,

,,

0

I

ENGINEERING
PHYSICAL SCIENCES
ARTS, SOCIAL SCIENCES

BUSINESS

All units of the Bell Telephone System
play parts in the satisfying and rewarding
job of making this country a nation of
neighbors.
The telephone operating companies and
Long Lines provide local and Long Dis-
tance telephone service that makes it pos-
sible to reach most everyone in this country
and many people in foreign countries.
Bell Telephone Laboratories invents and

ADMINISTRATION
designs and Western Electric manufac-
tures and distributes the equipment that
makes service better year after year.
The Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of
Western Electric, is concerned with the
military application of atomic energy.
The chart below may help you in con-
sidering how your education has prepared
you for a starting job with one of the Bell
Companies.

1I

TELEPHONE WESTERN BELL
COLLEGE MAJOR COMPANIES & ELECTRIC TELEPHONE SANDIA
LONG LINES COMPANY LABORATORIES ORPORATION
Engineering
Aeronautical . . . . . . X
Chemical . . . . . . . X
Civil . . . .X X__
Electrical X X X X
Industrial . X_. . . .X X
Mechanical . . . . . . X X X X
Metallurgical __ . X
Other degrees . . . . . X X
Physical Sciences
Chemistry . . . . . . _X X
Mathematics . . . . . X X X
Metallurgy . . . . X X
Physics X X X X
Arts and Social Sciences
Economics . . . . . . X X X
Humanities . . . . . . X X
Other degrees X X
Business Administration
Armn *.nn - - -- XYV

r

,.
.Y

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