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March 19, 1953 - Image 13

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-19

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THURSDAY. MARCH 19, 19.53

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

-BALMY DAYS AHEAD:
Spring Weather Will Bring
'Life' to U' Social Events

Students To Visit Florida, Bermuda

*1

By MARILYN CAMPBELL
Just as trees, grass and flowers
seem to burst into life in the spring,
so does the social life of University
students.
On' warm days bicycles, which
a eans of tasportation 1,become
pleasure vehicles. Many groups
have scheduled bike hikes to near-
by areas. * *
ANOTHER DIVERSION for en-
ergetic students in canoe trips on
the Huron River. Many of the
more avid canoeing fans in past
years have made all-day trips by
portaging first the dam below Bar-
ton Pond and then a railroad
bridge further on.
However, some of the students
who start out canoeing, end up
swimming, -either voluntarily or
by accident. Most of those who
have been "dunked" in past
years consider tipping over just
part of the fun.

Picnics will be among the most
popular social "doins" this spring
Many sorority and fraternity
houses will hold their picnics
' right in their own back yards."
OTHER POPULAR spots for
picnics will be the Island and the
well-publicized Arboretum.
A few houses, who made their
reservations well ahead of time,
will hold all-day picnics at the
University Fresh Air Camp.
After the "rainy season," im-
promptu softball games will pro-
vide sports-loving students with
hours of activity. Often residence
hall yards are adorned with well.-
trampled base paths.
Members of campus ROTC units,
reserve officers and members of
the national guard will attend the
annual Military Ball Friday.
The favorite avocation of most
students, however, is just sitting-
on benches, in chairs or on the
ground-with an easily recognized
spring fever look in their eyes'.

By PAT TEXTER
Looking forward to warmer
weather and no studies coeds are
turning their thoughts away from
mid-semesters to the pleasant task
of dusting of f their suitcases in
anticipation of the coming Spring
vacation which starts Friday.
With many cars leaving for
Florida, the sunny South will be
one of the most popular gathering
places of University students next
w eek. , , ,
AMONG THE Florida-bound
students will be a group of for-
esters who will travel South to
study the various kinds of hard-
wood in the Smokey Mt. states of
Tennessee, Kentucky, Mississippi
and the Carolinas. Included in the
educational tour will be a pleasure
visit to Florida.
Besides the sunny South many
students are making their final
preparations for vacations to
more distant places such as
Bermuda.
Following the long-established
Eastern college tradition of vaca-
tioning in the 365 islands, Michi-
gan students have recently staked

th~eir claim to the quaint English
atmosphere of the Bermuda is-
lands.
* * *
ALThIOUGH sun-bathing will
occupy a major part of their time,
.the students will be fascinated
with the idea of touring the is-
lands on the French motor bikes,
which are so characteristic of Ber-
muda.
Leaving their hotels and guest
cabins with a box lunch early in
the morning, the visitors will
enjoy exploring the coral reefs
and crystal caves.

Other interesting spots are the
Gibbs lighthouse, the world's
smallest bridge and Devil's hole,
an underwater cave featuring un-
usual varieties of tropical fish.
* * *
CAMERA enthusiasts will be
kept busy shooting scenic pictures
of the bright pink limestone homes,
the formalized gardens, and the
miles of white choral sand.
The annual rugby matches held
each year during college week be-
tween such schools as Dartmouth
and Princeton will be another us-
Iual attraction.

500 Cups of Coffee served at
"TH E PA RROT for Breakfast"
HOU RS:
* Breakfast 7:00-11 :00
* Lunch 11:00-2:00
* Budget Priced Dinners frorm 5:00-7:30 P.M.
T HE PA RROT
338 S. State St.

For Easter -Order NOW

!

Get Your New Suit
TAILREDTO MEASURE
FOR AS LOW AS
$250>4-.'
Choose from one of our
most Complete selections
WORST EDS
GABA RDIN ES
SH ARKSKI NS
TWEEDS
F LA NN ELS
and a host of other rich
* and colorful fabrics.

-Daily-Larry WIuk ,
DERBY DAZE - With the approach of the second "Wolverun Derby," scheduled for Friday,
March 27, these two veteran soap box builders are busy at work on their entry, "aided" by one of
their women sponsors. However, women in most of the competing groups will get their chance to
work at creating a costume for the driver of their cars. A trophy will be awarded by the central
committee to the best-dressed driver. In addition a trophy will be awarded to the car which
crossed the finish line in the fastest time and to the best-looking car. The derby is one of the fea-
tured events of the first Spring Weekend project.
Males W ill T ake Leading Roles
InDeb a BidesDivr

Be Sure You're Ready to
Step nto prin
Now is the time to be thinking about
that new spring wardrobe. Be ready to
join the Easter Parade...

By MARILYN CAMPBELL
University men will make their
attempts to be ''rolling successes ~
in the second "Wolverun Derby":
which will be held Friday after-
noon, March 27, on E. Washington
St., behind Health Service.
Only scholastically eligible male
students may drive one of the cars
entered in the race. .
* * *
THE SO-CALLED "weaker sex"
may participate in the project by
sponsoring one of these drivers.
A trophy will be awarded the
car reaching the finish line in
the fastest time.
Consequently, many men are
spending their extra time sawing
and hammering to get their en-
tries into the sleekest possible
form.

EKTNKER .6
KAH TAL EV ~LT
613 E A ST W IL L A M ST RE E T

ENTRY BLANKS for the race
are available in the Office of the
Interfraternity Council in the Un-
ion and from 3 to 5 p.m. daily in
Rm. 3D of the Union.
These entries must be turned
in by 5,p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 3D
of the Union.
Any group may enter as many
cars as it wishes, and a $2 entry
fee will be charged for each racer.
* * .
THESE CARS must meet cer-
tain specifications which have
been set up by the central com-
mittee. Copies of these specifica-
tions have been mailed to each
house and have been printed in
earlier issues of the Daily.
The first "Wolverun Derby"
was held as part of the Tennis
BalI Weekend sponsored by the
IUnion and WAA in 1951.

cars to the finish line with their
hands.
After the course was shorten-
ed, most of the cars managed
to break the tape at te fiish
To ensure that racers will get
off to a good start this year, a
starting ramp will be used.
* * *
DURING the first derby, men
and women sponsoring cars turn-
ed out to cheer on their racers.
Many special cheers and songs
were written for the occassion.
Also included as part of the
Spring Weekend project will be
the first Skit Night program.
Six groups, chosen on the basis
of scenerios submitted to the cen-
tral committee, will present ori-
ginal skits at 8:30 p.m. Saturday,
March 28, in competition for a
first place trophy.
Reserved seat tickets, priced at
75 cents, will be sold for the last
in the AdministrationBuilding.
Beginning Monday, general ad-
mission tickets, also priced at 75
cents, will go one sale at booths
in Mason Hall and the League.

You con choose from hard
cords, gabardines and the
ever popular grey flannel
ton sget dbreasted, patch
55.00
Ta complete your wardrobe,
select a pair or two of slacks'
from oiur large stock. You
are sure to find something
to your liking.
8,50 to 17.95
607 EAST LIBERTY
Next to the Michigan Theater

Here is a grand array of
and good looks. Styled in
the two button, patch pocket
model, you'll find plain
coo s, plids and English
25.00 up

/

.

V

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*. . .
"WE CAN'T HAVE any nails
sticking out," one of the soap box
builders said recently, "or the wind
resistance might keep our car from
reaching the finish line."
Awards will also be given for
the best looking racer, which will
be judged on the basis of work-
manship, originality and make
of the car.
The men have taken over the
greatest burden of constructing
the racers in most of the houses.
However, many of these "carpen-
ters" have had to admit that "she
can drive a nail better than I can."
THE DERBY'S best dressed
driver will also be awarded a prize
by the central committee.
In most houses, the problem
of creating a costume for the
driver has been left to the
women sponsors.
Men's groups wishing to take
part in the derby are urged by
special events co-chairmen Eliza-
beth Maire and Fritz Glover to
take the initiative in calling wo-
men's residences to participate
with them.

Racers were entered in "A"
"B" classes, depending on
wheel diameter of the car.

and
the

NOTE-Oxford
/ ~ Cloth Shirts with
button-down-collars
4 now available with
French Cuffs
Arrow $4.50
tailored by

Hundreds of good looking sport coals
and slacks-pure wools, nylons, orlons
and dacrons skillfully 4blended with
'iools.

.

SMOKED ELK-i 1.95

I All I I~"rr f~,l I~Id ~

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