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March 11, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PACE SM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 1953

I I I

CRAVEN HEADS 'U' SHOP:

Bookbinde
By NAN SWINEHART
Skills from the age of the ap-
prentice and master may be found
in the General Library's Book-
binding Shop.
Different from other binders
throughout the country, the Uni-
versity bookbindery is equipped to
bind not only recently printed
books but also those printed cen-
turies ago.
IN CHARGE of the shop is one
master of the trade, George E.
Craven. Born in Yorkshire Eng-
land, Craven has "been in the busi-
ness for 40 years" and learned his
skill through apprenticeship to a
master. This, he said, was accord-
ing to English law requiring a boy
to serve a five year apprentice-
ship upon reaching his middle
teens in order to enter the trade.-
Craven first came to America
in 1924 and becametassociated
with the University through an
acquaintance-the first manager
of the bookbinding shop.
Begun in 1903, the Bookbind-
ing Shop binds and mends books
for the University and its em.-
ployees. Aside from general re-
pairing of library books and bind-
ing of newspapers, pamphlets and
journals, the shop is also equipped
to mend rare books.
THIRTY thousand items rang-
ing from newspapers to rare books
passed through the shop last year,
Craven said.
Many old books are sewed on
a hand operated apparatus ra-
ther than by a machine. The
covers are made to look as much
like the original as possible. Pre-
serving, rather than replacing,
rare old bindings is the watch-
word.
Books for an everyday use in the
library and other parts of the Uni-
versity are machine-sewn and
covered by a less expensive but ex-
tremely durable material.
The bookbinding shop has all
the equipment needed to complete-
ly bind, every kind of printed ma-
terial.
Baekhaut
Case Ends
(Continued from Page 1)
Backhaut had been indicted
by a special YR Committee on
Discipline of "giving financial
and moral aid to the Democrats
and conduct unbecoming a
Young Republican."
The constitutional change pro-
viding for expulsion of a member
was passed last week at the same
time that the discipline committee
gave its report.
Reid maintained that under
Robert's Rules of Order any so-
ciety had an inherent to expel
one of its members.
To protect the rights of our
members we wanted to embody
this in the constitution before in-
stituting any proceedings, he
maintained.
Also at yesterday's meeting, the
SAC approved a change in the
Interfraternity Council constitu-
tion revising the make-up of the
executive council.
The council will have eight vot-
ing members, five house presi-
dents from geographic districts,
plus three alumni members from
the Ann Arbor vicinity, one to be
a faculty man.
Mortarboard, SL

To Sponsor Films
The Mortarboard Society, in
conjunction with the SL Cinema
Guild, will sponsor two movies at
the Architecture Auditorium this
week-end.
The movie, "The Lady Van-
ishes," will be shown at 7:30 and
9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday
and at 8 p.m. Sunday.
Loehr To Lecture
On Religious Art
Prof. Max Loehr of the Fine
Arts department will address the
Anthropology Club on "Sino-In-
dian Relations in Religious Art"
at 8 p.m. today in the East Con-
ference room of the Rackham Am-
phitheater.
The public is invited.
British Economy,
To Be Discussed
"Britain's Struggle for Economic
Survival" will be discussed by
James Callaghan, member of the
Labor Party's "Shadow Cabinet,"
at 4:15 p.m. Monday in Auditor-
ium A, Angell Hall.

rRenews Old Volumes
ii ::} {:'F .Tt :::}:;} :v.:i: }:YS}}:^:* * i}:t

APO Manual
Now Ready
A booklet compiled by Alpha
Phi Omega, national service fra-
ternity, listing services for cam-
pus and community organizations
is now available at the APO office
in the basement of the Student
Legislature Bldg.
The booklet lists services offered
by the Audio-Visual Center,
Fresh Air Camp, Michigan Daily,
League, Union, Office of Student
Affairs, University Plant Depart-
ment; Student Legislature and the
University News Service.
It gives additional information
on men's intra-mural sports and
on rooms available for group
meetings.
The- booklet was compiled as
part of the fratenity's program of
service to the campus and com-
munity.

Annual Drive
Reported Low
Washtenaw County is running
considerably behifnd last year's
pace at the close of the first week
of the Red Cross' annual fund
raising drive according to Mrs.
Jesse A. Coller, County chairman.
As of 5 p.m. Friday $8,504 had
been contributed to the "Answer
the Call" campaign. This com-
pares with $9,900 collected at the
close of the first week last year.

SL Agenda
Student Legislature will dis-
cuss the following reports and
motions when it meets at 7:30
p.m. today in Strauss Dining
Rm., East Quadrangle:
Motion to elect J-Hop com-
mittee members by Hare system
Report of committee to study
student representation on Uni-
versity committees
Driving ban report
Student Affairs Committee
report
All interested students and
faculty members are invited

'U' To Meet
16 Colleges
One hundred representatives of
16 Michigan junior and communi-
ty colleges will meet with Univers-
ity President Harlan H. Hatcher
.and deans of the University's fif-
teen colleges and schools Friday
at a Junior College Conference.
The meeting, sponsored by the
Committee on College Relations
will give delegates an opportunity
to exchange ideas on teaching
methods and purposes.

Williams ...
Governor G. Mennen Williams
will address the eighteenth an-
nual education convocation at 3 .
p.m. Monday in Rackhan Lec-
ture Hall.
Speaking °on "Developing Hu-
man Resources in Michigan," Gov.
Williams will address the 403 can-
didates for teacher's certificates.
His talk is open to the public.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

I

U, I

HAND SEWING APPARATUS IS USED IN BOOKBINDING

I.-

Basic Health
Problem Seen
In Duplication
The root of trouble in the field
of Public Health is the problem
of overlapping and duplication,
Bradley S. Buell, director of the
Community Research Associates,
said yesterday.
Speaking on "Re-tooling for
Human Betterment" Buell said the
most pressing family problems
were: financial dependency upon
the community, chronic physical
and mental illness and behavior
problems of delinquency and ne-
glect.
He went on to say that integra-
tion of the key local and state
leaders of welfare projects is the
solution to our present disorder.
The community's main social and
economic problems must be mu-
tually determined and objectives
clearly cited, he maintained.
Before achieving integration
Buell noted basic areas which must
first be examined. Mainly, an un-
derstanding of the concepts and
philosophies which motivate the
actions of service agencies.
His final suggestion concerned
integrated professional training
for the young men and women who
will eventually enter diverse hu-
manitarian services in their com-
munities.
Spurr To Talk
On Air-photos
Prof. Stephan Hr. Spurr of the
School of Natural Resources will
speak at 8 p.m. today in Rackham
Amphitheater on "Air-photos in
Natural Science."
In his talk, sponsored by Sigma
Xi scientific honorary Prof. Spurr
will use lantern slides to show
types of aerial photography and
will demonstrate three dimension-
al pictures.
A pioneer in the field of aerial
photography in connection with
forestry, Prof. Spurr is also con-
sidered one of the nation's lead-
ing men in obtaining surveys by
means of photography.
Faculty Panel Hits
Current Probes
(Continued from Page 1)
Biggest controversy in the four-
way discussion hinged on defini-
tion of the term "academic free-
dom." While Prof. Pollock main-
tained that the term covers only
faculty .freedoms, Prof. Aiken ex-
panded its meaning to a psychol-
ogical independence covering both
student and faculty rights.
Following the discussion, mod-
erator and SL president Howard
Willens, '53, announced that the
fourth Student Citizenship ses-
sion, a speech and discussion on
the concept of the educational
community, would be held at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow in Auditorium B,
Mason Hall.

For the Sharpest Greeting Cards
In Town
BUY PANDA
at
State St. at North University

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F ROMWIi-d s

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'THE
LAW'
by
William Sharp
Portfolio of 12
Drawings
Limited Edition
Size 13"x18" $10
Other drawings
include:
In the Surrogate
court
An Old
Acquaintance
The Interpreter
counsel's Advice
"If Your Honor
Please"
Order in the court
The Other Woman

-A 100-4qU~qK

i

"A F inePoint of Law"

A well known American artist depicts Court officers, defendants
and witnesses in a satirical style reminiscent of Daumier.
Don't miss this opportunity to secure your copy by sending $10.00
plus $.25 postage. Money back guarantee if not satisfied.
A very appropriate gift for a friend. Include your check
with the name and address and it will be shipped to any
point in the U.S.A.
HENRY GOTT LIEB
Art Center for Lawyers
10 West 33rd St., New York 1, N. Y. LOngocre 3-6817
Large selection of original oils, water colors, Audubon Birds and Currier
& Ives, also fine art reproductions of old and modern masters.

"A secure future, exceptional opportunities for advancement,
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one of the men we are looking for. We have openings right
now for qualified engineers and designers in all phases of
aircraft manufacturing; we need top-notch men to help us in
our long-range military program: turning out the famous
C-119 for the U. S. Air Forces.
"FAIRCHILD provides paid vacations and liberal health and
life insurance coverage. We work a 5-day, 40-hour week.
"If you feel you are one of the men we are looking for,
write me. Your inquiry will be held in strictest confidence,
of course."
* Walter Tydon, widely known aviation engineer and aircraft designer
and veteran of a .years in aviation, is Chief Engineer of Fairchild's
Aircraft Division.
SFAI RCH ILD dts~a
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roe HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND

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