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March 10, 1953 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-10

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PAGE SIB

TH E MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1953

. ...

Inter-Arts Festival

YD's To Ask
Lower State
VotingAge
Michigan Young Democrats will
push to lower the state voting age
to 18 and the YD membership age
to 16, Dorothy H. Myers, '55, state
YD vice-chairman, said yester-
day.
Miss Myers said plans for
changing the two age limits were
discussed at the state central
committee meeting Sunday fol-
lowing Saturday's annual Jeffer-
son-Jackson Day dinner in De-
troit.
She added that any definite ac-
tion on the membership proposal
will have to wait until it is
brought before the national YD
committee which meets in Den-
ver during May.
Present state and national YD
constitutions require members to
be between 18 and 35 years old.
Miss Myers pointed out that
three Detroit high schools have
joined in forming a YD organiza-
tion which may now receive only
an honorary charter since most
of the members are less than 18
years old.
The next state central commit-
tee meeting will be held in Ann
IArbor March 21.

OK USE OF LEECHES:
'U' Doctors Feel Stalin's
Stroke, Death Inevitable

By FRAN SHELDON
The recent critical illness and
subsequent death of Russian Pre-
mier Joseph Stalin was predict-
able, but unavoidable, opined sev-
eral University doctors yesterday.
According to Dr. Sibley W. Hoob-
ler, in charge of the Cardiovascular
Unit of the University Hospital,
"Stalin almost certainly had high
blood pressure."
IT IS HARD to say whether or
not he had any definite warning
signs before his stroke, but it
SL Announces
'83 Candidates
For Elections
(Continued from Page 1)
J-HOP COMMITTEE MEM-
BERS (nine posts)--Eugene M.
Curtis, Robert Dombrowski, Dor-
othy Fink. Paul Groffsky, Dotty
Ham, Donna Hoffman, Harold
Johnson, Phil Kearney, Jane Kohr,
Patricia Marx.
Jay Martin, Lance Minor, Betsy
Sherrer, Mary Sue Shoop, Nancy
Stevens, Jane Strom.
UNION VICE - PRESIDENTS
(five elected at large; one each
from Law School and Medical
School)-Harry Blum, '54BAd.;
Hugh Kabat, '54P, Bill Libby, '54-
NR, Howard Nemerovski, '54E,
Bob Perry, '53E, and Chuck Scholl
for vice-presidencies at large;
Harvey Howard, '55L, Bradford
Stone. '54L, and William Van't Hof,
'54L, for the Law School post; Ed-
wardRiefel, '56M, and Gerald
Gleich, '56M, for the Medical
School position.
BOARD IN CONTROL OF IN-
TERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS-
(one position)- Steve Jelin, '55,
and Andy Kaul, '55.

is highly probable that he did,"
he added.
Dr. Hoobler did not feel that
there was any type of treatment
which could have helped the ail-
ing Premier once he had been
struck.
"We're working hard, trying to
do something with hypertension.
That American medical knowledge
could have done something more
is possible, but not likely, since
there is no specific means of
treatment for this illness. He had
one form of hypertension for
which there is little known treat-
ment of any kind," he said.
Commenting , on the use of
leeches for the treatment of Stal-
in's high blood pressure, Dr. Hoob-
ler claimed that this means of
letting blood was an "acceptable
form of treatment," although rath-
er outmoded.
Dr. William M. Brace of the
University Health Service felt
that this method of blood-lett-
ing was "very old-fashioned, and
used to impress the Russian peo-
ple. That way they couldn't
claim that everything hadn't
been done to save him," he said.
As to the possible success of
American medical practices in the
case, Dr. Brace said, "I don't see
how anybody could have saved
him. He probably had the high
blood pressure for a long time,
and there isn't very much any-
body can do for a stroke."

SPRING-VACA1 ION
and b
VACATION-TRAVEL
Save Travel$
on Vulcan Trains
ON SALE TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
BEGINNING THIS WEEK
AT THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
1A00E-4:30
SAVE UP "TO -17.50
I"

r

-Daily-Don
ARTIST ADJUSTS PAINTING FOR EXHIBIT

COMBINING sculpture, painting
and ceramics, the Fifth An-
nual Inter-Arts Festival exhibi-
tion is now open to the public at
Alumni Memorial Hall.
The group of professional and
amateur works includes examples
of conventionalism, impression-
ism, cubism and surrealism.
Ceramics 'and jewelry ranging
from primitive Peruvian styles to

imaginative modern creations, are'
also on display. Haber Named
The exhibit is being held in
connection with the Inter-Arts
Festival week-end which includes j1s Mediator
a triple bill of original dance,
drama, and operatic work to be Prof. William Haber, of the eco-
presented the week-end of March nomics department, was named
27. yesterday to a three-man com-
Open to the public from 9 a.m. mission to help mediate a labor
to 5 p.m. daily, the exhibit will disuth between Cnsumers Pwr

READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

*

run until March 28.

Details of Masaryk Death Still

Mysterious Aft(
(Continued from Page 1)
at home. They are capable of
anything. Yet I cannot desert
my friends - President Benes
and the Czechoslovak demo-
crats."
"We might be defeated now, be-
ing faced with the overwhelming
might of the Soviet Union," Mac-
aryk's comment continued. "How-
ever, I do not--I cannot-believe
in the decisiveness of such a de-
feat. Sooner or later our people
will return to its own conceptions
of government, to humanitarian
democracy as it was understood by
my father, Thomas Masaryk, the
founder of democratic Szechoslo-
vakia."
.* * *
PROF. BENES declared that the
Reds "saw in Masaryk one of the
greatest obstacles to their endeav-
ors to strangle Czech democracy."
"No doubt Masaryk who, dur.
ing the crisis, had a number of
conversations with Valerin Zor-
in, the man whom Moscow sent
to organize the 'coup', had con-
vincing evidence of the Soviet
pressure exerted in Prague."
Prof. Benes indicated that more
concrete evidence of the murder
might be available that could not
be divulged.
"The revelation of such a story
might mean certain death to many
people in Czechoslovakia-people
who may be informed of some of
thee details of the Communist
crime," he said.
Prof. Benes declined comment
for this reason on a dispatch by
New York Times correspondent
C. L. Sulzberger on Dec. 29, 1951,
reporting that there was con-
clusive proof that the death was
murder.
The source was second-hand
fram a Prague police surgeon by
the name of Dr. Teply, who was
liquidated by a gasoline injection
two months later. According to
Sulzberger, it had been analyzed
and cross-checked through reli-
able refugee and other sources by
at least one intelligence agency

er Five Years
and a foreign ministry and ac-
cepted as substantially accurate.
DR. TEPLY claimed he found the
body covered with bruises, with a1
7.65 caliber bullet wound through
the nape of Masaryk's neck. His
heels had been smashed with a
hammer, and the condition of his
body was such as to leave no
doubt that he had been cruelly
beaten, then murdered.
The body was in pajamas -
with evidences of scorching on
the back of his neck, indicating
that the shot had been fired
from point blank range.
Nosek and Vladimir Clementis,
first Red foreign minister, since
purged, were busy rearranging the
disheveled apartment where Mas-
aryk led a quiet, bachelor's exist-
ence, when Dr. Teply made his
way up.
* - * .
CONFUSING the situation was
testimony reported in the New
York Times two weeks later from
Dr. Lumir Soukup, former private
secretary to Masaryk, who had es-
caped from Prague in the summer
of 1948.
The apparent bruises reported
were the marks left by an autopsy
he performed, Dr. Soukup main-
tained.
Masaryk had congded to Dr.
Soukup his intention to take his
own life, the former secretary de-
clared. He did it as a last gesture
to warn the still-vacillating West
of the reality of the Red menace,
the doctor said.
It will probably never be known
whether Prof. Benes is right in
his conviction that it was murder
-the Reds have a long record of
obliterating traces and rewriting
history. But the enigma of doubt
will never obscure the achieve-
ment of Jan Masaryk.

Co. and the CIO Michigan Statej
Utility Workers Council.I
Prof. Haber, a member of the
War Manpower Commission dur-
ing World War II, was named to
the mediation post by Gov. G.
Menen Williams.
Writer To Speak
on Danish Press

x'

Johannes Laursen, Danish wr it-:
er and lecturer, will speak on "The
Danish Press" at 3 p.m. tomor-
row in Rm. 1443 Mason Hall at an(
informal journalism departmentI
coffee hour meeting of faculty andI
students.
A University of Copenhagen
graduate, Laursen has served with
the Danish Information Office in
New York since 1950. The purpose
of the office, established by the
Danish government after World
War II, is to give information
about Denmark in the United
States.
The talk and coffee hour are
open to the public.
Lecture on Mati
Scheduled Today
Prof. J. A. Dieudonne will speak
on "The Language of Modern Al-
gebraic Geometry" at a meeting of
the mathematics club at 8 p.m. to-
day in the West Conference Rm.
of the Rackham Bldg.
Mozart Sonatas
Prof. Hans David of the music
school will talk on "The Late So-
natas of Mozart" in the fifth in a
series of lectures sponsored by the
School of Music at 4:15 p.m. today
in Auditorium A Angell Hall.

BOARD IN CONTROL OF STU-
DENT PUBLICATIONS - (three
positions) Don Dugger, '53BAd.;
Leonard Greenbaum, Grad.; Sue
Popkin, '54: Jessica Tanner, '55;
Alan Ternes, '55.
M* e
Mwrolofflli
the drawing pencil that
holds up under pressure
Microtomic-the finest example of
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Only Microtomic offers you-
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BULL'S EYE DEGREE MARKING
Easier to read - easier to find -
positive identification. . n
ALSO
Choice of holders and Microtomic
leads in all degrees.
: 1 1 ' ''1 i'"

It's the
size of the

V.

I'

in the
man!

I'll I

TRADSE MARKS REQ. U, S. PAT. OFF.In

-i

That's right! In the U. S. Air Force, it's not the
size of the man in the fight-it's the size of the
FIGHT IN THE MAN! And Aviation Cadets must have
plenty of it. For Cadet training is rugged. If you're
good enough. . . tough enough ... smart enough ...
if you can take it while you're learning to dish it
out, you can have one of the most fascinating careers
in the world. You'll be equipped to fly the latest,
hottest planes. You'll be prepared to take your
position as an executive, both in military and com-
mercial aviation as well as in industry. And while
you're helping yourselfyou'll be helping your country.

v

WIN YOUR WINGS! It takes little over a
year to win your wings as a Pilot or Aircraft
Observer (Navigator,Bombardier,RadarOperator
or Aircraft Performance Engineer). But at the end
of your training you graduate as a 2nd Lieutenant
in the Air Force, with pay of $5,300.00 a year.
ARE YOU ELIGIBLE? To qualify as an Aviation
Cadet, you must have completed at least two years
of college. This is a minimum requirement-
it's best if you stay in school and graduate. In
addition, you must be between 19 and 261% years,
unmarried, and in good physical condition.

t

New Aviation Cadet Training Classes Begin Every Few Weeks!
HERE'S WHAT TO DO:
1. Take-a transcript of your college credits and a copy of 4. If you pass your physical and other tests, you will be
your birth certificate to your nearest Air Force Base or scheduled for an Aviation Cadet training class. The
Recruiting Station. Fill out the application they give you. Selective Service Act allows you a four-month deferment
while waiting class assignment.
2. If application is accepted, the Air Force will give you a whRewtigTaMOREiDet
physical examination. ViErE Air orE DEAiru:
Visit your nearest Air Force Base, Air Force Recruiting Officer, or

- Uof colors, .C ST es n Wri e I~JI r ppi5 I'I1

0

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