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March 10, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-10

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TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1953

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TMEE

U

PAGE THREE

Gomberg Quintet Wins
In Dorm*Cage Playoff

COLORADO BOUND:
M' Hockey Team Departs Tomorrow

Gymnastics Squad Hurt
By Lack of Experience

By JIM DYGERT
Gomberg House put on the
+freeze in the last few minutes to
protect its lead and down Ander-
son House, 41-35, last night in
the first championship playoff
round of the Residence Halls "A"
league.
Paced by Bob Woschitz, who
netted 14 points, Gomberg jumped
to an early lead only to see An-
derson fight back to tie the score
at halftime, 15-15. The winners
dumped in three quick buckets at
the beginning of the second half to
take a lead they never relin-
quished.
* * *
WITH JACK Gallander leading
the way on a 15-point total, An-
derson matched Gomberg basket
for basket the rest of the way,
but finally yielded to Gomberg's
stalling tactics.
In the other championship
playoff, Winchell dumped Hins-
dale, 32-25, in a game dominated
by defensive play. The teams
played on even terms until the
end of the first half when Win-.
shell scored a basket for a 16-14
margin.
The West Quaders then poured
ti
1-M Scores
BASKETBALL
"A" LEAGUE, CHAMPIONSHIP
PLAYOFFS
Gomberg 41, Anderson 35
Winchell 32, Hinsdale 25
SECOND PLACE PLAYOFFS
Cooley 43, Van Tyne 16
Chicago 45, Williams 28
THIRD PLACE PLAYOFFS
Taylor 82, Michigan7
Allen-Rumsey 38, Huber 17
FOURTH PLACE PLAYOFFS
Lloyd 38, Kelsey 36 (overtime)
Strauss 35, Wenley 33 (over-
time)
FIFTH PLACE PLAYOFF
Hayden 44, Adams 21
B' LEAGUE, CHAMPIONSHIP
PLAYOFFS
Wenley 32, Cooley 26
Gomberg 56, Lloyd 26
SECOND PLACE PLAYOFFS
Allen-Rumsey 24, Huber 21
Winchell defeated Fletcher (for-
feit)
THIRD PLACE PLAYOFFS
Chicago 65, Kelsey 34
Anderson 41, Williams 32
FOURTH PLACE PLAYOFFS
Adams 33, Reeves 29
Hinsdale 24, Van Tyne 21
FIFTH PLACE PLAYOFF
Hayden 60, Taylor 12
Michigan defeated Scott (for-
feit)

in points to grab a 28-20 lead with
Ivan Goldberg, who totaled 12
counters, in the driver's seat.
* * *
WINCHELL then settled down
to protect its edge and eliminate
Hinsdale from the playoffs. Laur-
en Schleh topped the losers with
ten points.
Chicago House exploded in
the second half to trounce Wil-
liams, 45-28, in a second place
playoff tilt. Chicago, sparked by
Phil Thibault's 14 pounts, cut an
early nine point deficit to trail,
19-17, at halftime.
The winners then snared 14
points while Williams was garner-
ing only one, to take the lead, 31-
20. Caught off guard by the on-
slaught, Williams was able to net
only eight more points while Chi-
cago was widening its margin.
COOLEY, starting slow, woke up

in the second half to overwhelm
Van Tyne, 43-16, in the other sec-
ond place playoff. Although Cooley
held only a 14-9 lead at the half,
it started to click after the sec-
ond-half tip-off with Stan Gooch
dropping ten of his 12 points
through the hoop in that period.
In the championship playoffs
in the "B" league, Gomber House
opened up a wide 30-17 halftime
advantage and went on to wal-
lop Lloyd House, 65-26. Frank
Drinan and Marshall Sylvan led
the devastating attack with 15
and 14 points respectively.
Wenley came out on top of Coo-
ley, 32-26, in the other "B" cham-
pionship contest. Wenley grabbed
a 15-8 edge at the half and with-
stood a Cooley rally to win. Bob
Schoenhals of Wenley and Jim
Powers of Cooley topped the scor-
ing, each with 12 points.

Fourteen veterans of Wolverine
ice wars, many of them bruised
and lame from last weekend's rug-
ged series with Michigan Tech,
leave tomorrow for hostile Colo-
rado Springs in quest of Michi-
gan's third successive national
collegiate hockey championship.
The plucky puck chasers will
meet a chartered plane at Wil-
low Run at 1 p.m.
Aboard the plane will be teams
representing Boston University
and Rensaleer Polytechnic Insti-
tute, the two Eastern entries in
the NCAA playoffs. The fourth
team is Minnesota, co-champion
with Michigan in the Midwest
Collegiate Hockey League.
Final destination is the Broad-
moore Ice Palace, home rink for
the Colorado College sextet and
scene of numerous Wolverine
heartbreaks and successes.
It was on Broadmoor ice that
Michigan, only team to makeall
NCAA playoffs, won three out of
five national c1hampionships, in-
cluding the first in 1948. Last
March the Wolverines rubbed it in
with a 4-1 victory over hometown
Colorado in the finals.
BUT in December, the Colorado
fans got their revenge, as Denver
whipped Michigan, 5-4, in over-
time. Wolverine forward Johnny
McKennell was accused of slug-
ging the referee and was suspend-
FINAL BIG TEN
BASKETBALL STANDINGS

ed for the year. Coupled with the
between-semester loss of Earl
Keyes, the suspension put the
damper on Michigan hopes to
make the playoffs this year.
Undaunted, Vic Heyliger's
men in blue skated to the top
of the MCHL with the hat trick
of college hockey-three straight
crowns--as their goal.
Friday night, Boston University
will present the first obstacle in
Michigan's path. Saturday night,
the winner of this game will play
the winner of Thursday's Minne-
sota--R.P.I: contest for the NCAA
championship, A consolation
match between the two losers is
scheduled for Saturday afternoon.
SEVERAL players are still on
the injury list, but trainer Karl

Isaacson expects to have them all
in working condition for the first
faceoff Friday evening.
Willard Ikola's groin injury is
healing slowly, but he will prob-
ably feel good enough to start
Friday night. Assistant goal
tender Bill Lucier, one of the
heroes of last weekend's twin
victory over Michigan Tech, will
make the trip for insurance.
Defenseman Reg. Shave's bad
back is responding to treatment as
are Doug Philpott's sore leg and
George Chin's sore face. Bert
Dunn is carrying four stitches on
his head, but the scrappy Mon-
treal junior expects to be in top
shape for the coming weekend's
festivities.
The bus carrying the team to
Willow Run leaves the Union at
12:30 p.m. tomorrow.

Michigan's lack of versatility
and experience showed in last
weekend's Big Ten gymnastics
meet.
The Wolverines finished sixth
registering less than a third of
the point-total of meet-winning
Illinois.
* * *
TWO OF THE SIX men whom
Coach Newt Loken took to East
Lansing are in their first season
of competition. Jim Barbero, while
looking good on the side horse
still lacks the finess which makes
a Conference champion. The same
may be said of trampoliner Jack
Eckle.
Eckle managed to edge- into a
spot in the finals competition
but did not place against the
Midwest's top men..
Of the Maize and Blue's four
remaining men Dick Bergmann

I ~ - -

is known as a threat in only one
event, the flying rings, and Don
Hurst sticks strickly to tramp and
tumbling.
MARV JOHNSON came through
in four events to give the kind of
all-round performance that won
the meet for Illinois.
The Illini boasted four top men
in Bob Sullivan, Frank Bare, Jeff
Austin, and Gil Brinkmeyer. All
but Brinkmeyer placed in the top
five in more than one event.
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
New York (N) 9, Chicago (N) 4
Boston (N), 6, St. Louis (N) 4
New York (A) 6, Boston (A) 4
Detroit (A) 7, Cincinnati (N) 3
Cleveland (A) 12, Chicago (A) 7
N.I.T. BASKETBALL
St. Johns 75, LaSalle 74
Niagara 82 Brigham Young 76

Michigan Five Bows to OSU;
Finishes in Conference Cellar

(Continued from Page 1)
Don Eaddy netted the first
Michigan bucket with 6:46 left
in the opening session to make
the tally read 7-3, and Eaddy's
rebound with 55 seconds remain-
ing and a jump shot by Ray
Pavichevich were the only other
Maize and Blue field goals in the
first ten minutes.
Ralph Kauffman came off the
bench to pace the Michigan quin-
tet in the next stanza. The Elk-
hart, Indiana sophomore who had
seen only reserve action for most
of the season, found the range for
seven of Michigan's 22 points in
the second quarter.
KAUFFMAN was aided by John
Codwell off the boards and from
the floor. Codwell, however, drew
his fourth personal foul with 48
seconds to go in the half as did
center Paul Groffsky.
Ebert and Wilks went wild
again in the third session that
saw the Ohio Staters go ahead
as they pleased, finally making
the count read 73-51 after thirty
minutes.
Captain Doug Lawrence, making
his last appearance in a college
basketball game, opened the final
chukker with a pair of quick lay-
ups to close the ga) to 73-55, but
the losers never ca ne closer.

LAWRENCE wound up with 14
markers, all coming in the last 18
minutes, second only to Kauff-
man who poured in 16 to pace
coach Bill Perigo's charges. Cod-
well with 12 and Milt Mead with
12 also hit double figures as Mich-
igan concluded its worst basketball
season in a decade.
The Wolverines could manage
only three wins in 18 league
startstand six wins and 16
losses overall.
The 95-point OSU attack was
the highest ever scored here at
the Coliseum. The former standard
was 93 set by Illinois as the Illini
trounced the Buckeyes last Satur-
day night.

Indiana
Illinois
Mich, State
Minnesota
Wisconsin
Iowa
Ohio State
Northwestern
MICHIGAN
Purdue

w
17
14
11
11
1
9
7
5
3
3

L
1
4
7
7
8
9
11
13
15
15

Pct.
.944
.778
.611
.611
.556
.500
.389
.278
.167
.167

One Man Tells Another
WE PRIDE OURSELVES ON HAVING THE MOST
LOYAL CUSTOMERS THAT ANY STORE COULD
POSSIBLY HAVE. NOT ONLY DO THEY WEAR
THEIR STAEB & HUSS CLOTHES WITH GREAT
PRIDE, BUT THE GO OUT OF THEIR WAY TO
ACT AS AMBASSADORS OF GOOD WILL FOR US.
IT IS A DAILY OCCURRENCE IN OUR CLOTHING
AND FURNISHINGS STORE TO HAVE MEN IN-
TRODUCED TO US AS NEW CUSTOMERS BY
THEIR FRIENDS WHOM WE HAVE SERVED FOR
MANY YEARS. THIS CLOSE RELATIONSHIP BE-
TWEEN OUR PATRONS AND STAEB & HUSS IS
OUR GREATEST ASSET. IT MAKES OUR EXTRA
EFFORT TO SELL AT "THE SMALLEST MARGIN
OF PROFIT KNOWN"-TO PROVIDE THE FINEST
CLOTHING KNOWN -- A WORTHWHILE AND
GRATIFYING WAY OF DOING BUSINESS. JOIN
OUR EVER-GROWING FOLLOWING, AND KNOW
FOR YOURSELF THE SATISFACTION OF WEAR-
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"W e irvp to Serve Again"
309 South Main Street

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MICHIGAN
CodwelG f
Mead f
Kauffman I
Bruce
Groffsky c
Lawrence g
Eaddy g
Pavichevich g
Totals
OHIO STATE
Wijiams f
Wilks I
Ebert c
Hatfield g
Cook g
Jones g
Miller f
Leggett f
Ropes e
Smith g
Totals
MICHIGAN
Ohio State

4
3
6
0
3
6
2
27
G
5
6
14
5
4
3
0
0
1
39

F
4
4
4
1
0
0
17
F
3
3
6.
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
17

I,
4
3
3
I
5
3
1
21
P
4
2
4
3
I
1
1
0
1
0
17

T
12
10
16
2
7
14
6
4
71
T
13
15
34
13
10
6
0
0
2
95

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Illinois 86, Northwestern 70
Indiana 68, Iowa 61
Wisconsin 58, Michigan State 51
Kansas 69, Missouri 60
Princeton 70, Columbia 58
Penn 77, Harvard 49
Collegiate Cuts
FOR SPRING:
They're Smart,
Suave, Individualistic
8 TONSORIAL ARTISTS
- No Waiting --
The Dascola Barbers
Liberty, near Mich. Theatre

__ _

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t b" hat qualitiesrdo T need for a

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... HARRY K. LEADER, Lafayette College,
Two answers to this question, given at a student information n
held in July, 1952, between G-E personnel and representative c
students, are printed below. If you have a question you wou
answered, or seek further information about General Electri
your request to College Editor, Dept. 221-6, General Electr
Schenectady, N. Y.
G. C. HOUSTON, Manu-
facturing Services Division ...°
While this is a rather broad
question; I am sure it is one
of real importance to any1
young man starting out in
industry and looking forward
to a po tion of responsibility
in any of our successful in-,
dustrial enterprises.
The mere asking of this question indicates that the in-,
'dividual has a definite goal or objective. This is important
since progress can be made only if we attempt to reach a
well-defined objective-even though it may be modified
to some extent in the light of later experience. In G.E.
we are looking for young men who have not only deter-
mined their objective but who are ready to work for it-.
who accept responsibility and have ability to get things
done-who work well with others-to be a part of the
team.
This calls for other qualities essential to long range
success. We look for the enthusiastic individual, one
not easily discouraged, and who can inspire the confidence
of his co-workers. We desire individuals who show im-
agination and good judgment--particularly the ability to
look ahead and maintain perspective beyond the imme-
diate situation. Finally, we cannot overlook the qualities
of loyalty and dependability since these are important in'
steering the individual through periods of discouragement
which occur in every career.
When you decide on your business affiliation; make
sure you associate yourself with a company that is
soundly managed, that has a good business future, and
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