100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 08, 1953 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,:4

'AGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 8, 1953

WHITHER WANDERLUST:
Travel Bureau Set To Open

4>

* * * *

By VIRGINIA VOSS
A poster-littered room in Lane
Hall will be opened tomorrow for
students with one characteristic in
common-wanderlust.
Banking on the premise that
students who haven't already been
hit by the trip-to-Europe lure
sooner or later will be, the Stu-
dent Legislature and Student Reli-
gious Association are jointly spon-
soring a campus non-profit travel
bureau.
REALIZING that travel has be-
come more than the proverbial
"broadening experience," the Na-
tional Student Association and
other groups have provided the
bureau with pamphlets outlining
myriad national and international
trip possibilities.
Most plans are geared towards
sending the American student
abroad as an "unofficial am-
bassador" and giving him inter-
national understanding in re-
turn.
Individual pocketbooks come in
for a major share of consideration.
Cheapest of the travel plans
are summer work programs, usual-
ly restricted to a single country
and set up on an earn-your-way
basis except for boat fare.
STATE DEPARTMENT-author-
ized, an Experiment in Interna-
tional Living prepares students for
foreign service or United Nations
jobs by lodging them in a home
abroad and thus providing a close
cultural and social orientation with
a foreign land.
The plan emphasizes "family
living in one country rather
than sight-seeing in 20" and has
handled 5,000 students in its 20-
year existence.
For those who would rather do
"sight-seeing in 20," there are
foreign tours averaging $750 to
$1,000.
Study-travel programs offering
college credit in subjects ranging'
from film appreciation to "Six
Thousand Years in Twelve Weeks"
history courses are sponsored by
most European universities.
The SL-SRA bureau, located on
the main floor of Lane Hall, will
be staffed with advisory person-
nel from 3 to 5:30 p.m. every Mon-
day through Friday, according to
Ruth Rossner, '55, director of the
project for SL.
Architecture FilmsI
The American Institute of Ar-
chitects will present two films,
"Bridging San Francisco Bay,"
and "Building for the Nations,",
at 4 p.m. tomorrow in the Archi-
tecture Auditorium.>
The movies are open to thel
public.s

S ~
ss
Ar-
..

Haber Says
Welfare Aid
Increas ing
"Our national income must
steadily grow if we are to prevent
increasing welfare costs from be-
coming a critical economic bur-
den," Prof. William Haber of the
economics department said yes-
terday.
Prof. Haber spoke before the
annual Alumni Conference of the
New York School of Social Work
at Columbia University.
Lecturing on "Social Welfare-
Economic and Political Realities,"
Prof. Haber pointed out that there
is little possibility of our welfare
expenses decreasing in future
years.
"Quite to the contrary," he said,
"the trend is in the opposite dir-
ection, even under conditions of
high employment."
He went on to explain that vet-
eran's benefits, related programs
and other welfare expenditures
have been increasing steadily for
more than 15 years, until by the
fiscal year of 1951 they exceeded
six per cent of the national in-
come. Adding the cost of public
education, he commented that
"over nine per cent of the income
was spent on social welfare bene-
fits."

BARBARA WARD JACKSON:
English Economist Values Art, Religion

THE MTCHTLAN fL'u LAT SUNAY MAGHS.-Y

By MARK READER
Although economics, Shake-
speare and religion cover the most
diversified range of interests, Bar-
bara Ward Jackson, assistant edi-
tor of the London "Economist" has
had time to delve intensively into
all three subjects.
The famed Englishwoman who
left the University yesterday for
New York, after successfully in-
augurating the Mott Foundation
lecture series, has also, during her
38-year life, written four books
and traveled extensively through-
out the world.
BETWEEN speeches and teas
while on campus, Mrs. Jackson
found time during her exhaustive
schedule to briefly sketch to The
Daily an outline of her achieve-
ments to date.
The tall, charming English-
woman was born in York, Eng-
land, May 23, 1914 and began
to attend school at the age of
seven. Educated at the Convent
of Jesus and Mary at Felixtowe
until she was 15, Mrs. Jackson
received her early background
in Catholicism there.
After graduating from the Con-
vent, Mrs. Jackson studied both
in France and Germany. Her
courses at the Lycee Meliere and
the Sorbonne were, as she put it,
"general humanity courses" and

tained a position on the London
"Economist." Before the Second
World War broke out, she had
managed to get a minor post in
one of the government ministries.
However, economy measures
forced on the government as a
result of the war caused the six
youngest members of the min-
istry to be fired. Mrs. Jackson
was one of them.
Fortunately a position was open
on the f'Economist" and Mrs.
Jackson was able to step in. Since
that time she has worked herself
up to the position of assistant edi-
tor.
Mrs. Jackson told the Economics
Club while she was here. "I am
only a working economist,"
In 1945 Mrs. Jackson became
a member of the Old Vie and
the Sadler's Wells Theaters. Al-
though the pressure of work
forced her to give up her posif
tion in the Sadler's Wells The-
ater, Mrs. Jackson is presently
engaged in the attempt to bring
a more complete repertory
Shakespearean theater to Eng-
land.
Mrs. Jackson "indicated before
she left campus that she would.
have to take some time to recup-
erate from her strenuous activi-
ties before she makes definite
plans for the future.
However, she said, "Perhaps a;
trip to Africa is next."

A its Group
Holds'Sing'
The second folk-sing night un-
der the sponsorship of the Arts
Theater will take place at '8 p.m.
tomorrow in the theater at 209%
E. Washington.
The idea for the folk sing night
originated amongst University
students and the opening perfor-
mance was marked by the singing
of ancient ballads and jazz guitar
selections.
Members of the Arts Theater
will be admitted to the informal
get-together, free of charge. An
admission feeof 25 cents will be
charged to non-members who are
interested in attending.
YDs Ask Support
For Stevenson
The campus Young Democrats
have turned to the mails in their
campaign to raise money for Adlat
Stevenson, defeated presidential
candidate.
YD president Blue Carstenson,
Grad., said letters have been sent
requesting pledges of financial
support from all students who
have shown interest in the Demo-
cratic party.
Initial plans to contact students
personally were blocked by the
Student Affairs Committee several
weeks ago.

':

-Daily-Don Campbell
BARBARA WARD JACKSON
likes Shakespeare too
* * es e r *
involved readings of the world's
great literature.
Mrs. Jackson said that in these
early years, most of her real edu-
cation was learned at home. She
noted that when she graduated
from college in 1937 she had a
knowledge of a "bit of everything"
but had been unable to master any
one field.
SS * *'
IT WAS BY fortune that she at-

~-Daily-Stu Ros

EGYPT, PLEASE .. .one way

Events of the Week

weeks ago.

f

MONDAY-
Oratorical Association Lecture,
"Reston Views the News," by
James Reston, New York Times
correspondent. 8:30 p.m., Hill Au-
ditorium.
TUESDAY--
Bradley S. Buell, Executive di-
rector of the Community Research
Associates, New York City, will
speak on "Re-tooling for Human
Betterment," at 4 p.m. in the
School of Public Health Auditor-
ium.
Department of Journalism lec-
ture by William Costello, Colum-
bia Broadcasting System corres-
pondent, will discuss "Asiatic
Problems" at 4:15 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheater.
* * *
WEDNESDAY-
Johannes Laursen, Danish writ-
er will speak on "The Danish
Press" at 3 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
State High-school Regional Bas-
ketball - Classes A, C and D. 6,
7:30 and 9 p.m., Yost Field House.
* * *
THURSDAY-
State High-School Regional Bas-
ketball-Class A, C and D. 6, 7:30
and 9 p.m., Yost Field House.

Choral Union Concert by
tur Rubinstein, pianist. 8:30 p
Hill Auditorium.
"S *, '

FRIDAY--
Cinema Guild and Mortarboard
film, "The Lady Vanishes." 7 and
9:30 p.m., Architecture Auditori-
un, continuing through Sunday.
Sunday's showing at 8 p.m.
Motion pictures, presented by
the University Museums. "Amoe-
ba," "Ameoba and Vorticella" and
"Life in a Drop of Water." 7:30
and 8:10 p.m., Kellogg Auditori-
um.
Concert, presented by the School
of Music. "The St. 01atthew Pas-
sion," by Bach, performed by the
University Choir and Festival
High-School Choir with Maynard
Klein conducting 8 p.m., Hill Au-
ditorium.
SATURDAY--

t
A
IS"

R
'.
'.t
'Ur + '
x
4
w
.+..

' S

Concert, presented by the Me
Glee Club, Fred Waring andt
Pennsylvanians. 7 and 9:30 p.
Hill Auditorium.
State High-School Region
Basketball-Classes A, C, and
6, 7:30 and. 9 p.m. Yost Fi
House.

The price has di
/ , ~,
,<. 7f. , .
,5.~
t
Michgan ailySubs

'opped!

en's
the
.m.,
ral
D.
eld

4

".1

r a ;
_ '
- - y.
- - ,_$: .
- _ :
r
w

1

A

I 4W-,"W

I

.,;;
555
'f-s
/J

t'
R
I
7

1

.
S
t

lk.
J
,t{ E
Qi A

i
1
:'
.
i;
4

I
4 f

f

F

t.

r
y4

li. I

:,

.!3

.
.4 a
7i

t.'
' y

4

w

I

w

ar
. : 'r
' ~ ; r
t1:'
*

.1/I
I.

I

OH, WHAT A GRAND AND

GLORIOUS FEELING!

rr
I :i
f (
, 5 5
Si.k {
Y
! 5; :

(Come in this week and share it with us.)

if.
i ''*
S j

4h

We're all new, everything is as "fresh as a daisy."
We're remodeled, redecorated, and all dressed up
for your EASTER PLEASURE.
YOUR FAVORITE FASHION STORE with the
newest Easter collections in town has re-opened.

k

riptions

aWII Wmpp

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan