100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 06, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 1953

PAGESIX RIDA, MACH ~ 19I

West Seen Tested
By Communism
Mrs. Jackson Claims Democracy
Challenged on Own Moral Grounds
By MARK READER
The western world is not dealing with a blind adversary in Com-
munism but one that challenges us on our own, grounds, Barbara
Ward Jackson claimed yesterday, in the final lecture of the first Mott
Foundation series.
A jam-packed audience in Rackham Lecture Hall heard Mrs.
Jackson explain that for the first time Western society "feels judg-
ment being passed on itself."
THE EMINENT Englishwoman, speaking on "Moral Order in an
Uncertain World," charged Communism with "attempting to exploit

--U

Green Calls
UN 'Forum'
For World
"An annual forum to debate the
state of the world is finally here
in the United Nations," James F.
Green, noted American diploiat,
said yesterday in an address to the
campus International Relations
Club.
Green, a former teacher of in-
ternational relations and now dep-
uty director of the State Depart-
ment's Office of United Nations
Social and Economic Affairs, out-
lined four functions that the UN
General Assembly performs.
FIRST, it formulates world pol-
icy and makes recommendations
to all 60 participating member na-
tions and its own branches, such
as the World Health Organiza-
tion and the Trusteeship Council.
Secondly, the General Assem-
bly supervises all branches of
the UN except the Security
Council. Also, it approves
treaties drafted by units in the
organization and often revises
them so they will be acceptable
to the entire Assembly, Green
said.
The fourth major function of
the Assembly is "keeping house"
for the UN, balancing the budget
and assessing member nations
the amount they owe to the or-
ganization, hehcontinued.
"In spite of all obstructions in
the UN," Green claimed that the
organization is "invaluable in
terms of propaganda." "This 'town
meeting of the world' is the only
place where our country can ef-
fectively deny blatantly false
charges, such as germ-warfare
and Korean atrocities, which are
often leveled against us," he said.
Shakespeare
Comedy Film
To Be Shown
"As You Like It, the motion
picture adaptation of Shakes-
peare's comedy, will be this week's
presentation of the Student Legis-
lature Cinema Guild.
Starring in "As You Like It," are
Elizabeth Bergner and the re-
nowned Shakespearean actor,
Laurence Olivier. Critics have
commended the two actors for
their masterful communication of
all the wit and farce Shakespeare
put into the comedy.
A pair of Walt Disney cartoons
will accompany the feature. One
of the technicolor films, "Behind
the Scenes," is narrated by Robert
Benchley.
The films will be shown at 7
and 9:15 p.m. today and tomor-
Now and at 8 p.m. Sunday in Arch-
itecture Auditorium. Admission is
50 cents.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
the Yps group to the retreat. Wear
slacks-dress warmly. Bring notebooks,

Bible, pencils, etc. There will be a small
charge to cover our supper.
Bridge tournament. Sunday at 8 p.m.
at the Hillel Building. Everyone is
welcome, with or without a partner.
Hillelzapoppin'. Wed., Mar. 11, at Lyd-
ia Mendelssohn Theater at 8 p.m. Tick-
ets go on sale Monday at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater box office from
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Faculty Sports Night. I.M. Building,
Sat., Mar. 7, at 7:30 p.m. All equipment

our own sense of moral inade-
quacy."
Believing that if the West
were to succeed in developing a
moral order, the assistant editor
of the London "Economist" said,
"It is not a question of beating
Communism that will bring it
about, but the desire to have a
humane society because it is an
aim in itself."
"There is a humane part in all
of us which wants a society that
expresses brotherhood," she con-
tinued.
* * *
OUTLINING THE importance
of religious thought in history,
Mrs. Jackson expressed the belief
that Western liberties and the
whole ordering of society has been
profoundly interwoven with relig-
ion.
In attacking a materialistic
philosophy, she maintained,
"There have been two revolu-
tions towards freedom, both of
which have been based on con-
stitutional and religious moods.".
She was referring to the English
and American revolutions.
"The two revolutions which
looked toward pure reason," she
went on, "had far more equivocal
consequences." These she felt were
the French and Russian revolts.
Mrs. Jackson felt that the heart
of the materialistic-religious con-
troversy lay in the credibility of
religious thought.
"Even if you explain away the
concepts of good, truth, and other
absolutes as a conditional reac-
tion to society," she argued, "you
cannot explain how these concepts
entered the world." The individual,
she felt, must reject a complete
materialistic philosophy.
wolverine
Reservations can still be
made for the Wolverine Club
trip to tomorrow's basketball
game in East Lansing from 1 to
4 p.m. today in the Administra-
tion Bldg..
Bob Golten, '54, club presi-
dent, announced that students
taking the trip will have two
hours following the game to
attend such scheduled events
as a Union dance and the
Western Conference wrestling
match.

Power Fight
Symbolizes
Stalin's Life
By The Associated Press
Stalin ruled Russia as undis-
puted dictator for nearly 30 years.
Through communism, he ex-
tended his sway beyond the bord-
ers of the Soviet Union and its
200 million people to areas en-
compassing another half billion
people.-
HIS LIFE of never-ending in-
trigue, ruthless ambition and fan-;
tastic power helped shape much1
of the world's history.E
He was christened Joseph Vis-
sarionovich Djugashvili in Gori,
Georgia, on Dec. 21, 1879.
When he was 15 his mother en-
tered him in a seminary where
there was a hotbed of revolution-
ary activity.
Stalin joined the revolutionists
and first came upon the works of
Karl Marx.I
IN 1902, HE was arrested by the
czar's secret police. He was re-f
leased 18 months later, but while
in prison he became a member of
the party which at this time was1
splitting into the Mensheviks mi-
nority and the Bolsheviks majority.
In May, 1922, Lenin suffered a
stroke, and lingered until Jan.
21, 1924.
Stalin rode out the ensuing pow-
er struggle and fought Trotsky to
a finish. Stalin won and expelled
Trotsky in 1926.
He instituted a Five-Year
Plan in 1928 to increase the con-
struction of heavy industry and1
the productivity of agriculture.
In 1936 the official draft of the]
"Stalin Constitution" was made
the general law of the land. At4
about the same time the series of
great purges began which rid those
in the government considered op-
posed to the Stalin regime.
James Reston
'WillLeture
A few more facts on the most
talked about, least known man of
the century were uncovered in
December to people across the
United States in an exclusive New
York Times mail interview with
USSR Premier Joseph Stalin.
Obtaining a major newsstory
was nothing new, however, to
Times correspondent James Res-
ton. The career of Reston, who will
appear at 8:30 p.m. Monday in
Hill Auditorium, has been dotted
with adventures in journalism.
Reston's first triumph as a re-
porter came in 1944, when he was
awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his
news dispatches and interpreta-
tive articles on the Dumbarton
Oaks Security Conference.
Tickets for "Reston in the News"
will be on sale from 10 a.m. until
8:30 p.m. Monday at Hill Audi-
torium box office, priced at one
dollar and $1.25.

The plucky Windsor, Ont. soph-
omore took over the last two
periods against Michigan State
in workmanlike fashion.
Easily the coolest player on the
ice in one of the hottest games of
the year, Lucier limited the Spar-
tans to only two goals.
RON MARTINSON, who broke
his leg early in the season, is
back in top shape again. "Marty"
scored his second goal of the year
Wednesday and should help the
Michigan scoring attack this week-
end.
Michigan Tech brings a league
record of three wins and ten
losses into the Coliseum. The
Huskies boast two victories over
Michigan State and one over
Colorado College.
In Joe DeBastiani, the visitors
have one of the best all-around
men in the league. He came up to
Tech as a forward but was switch-
ed to defense last year.
EVEN SO, he managed to make
last winter's MCHL second team.
This winter he again made the
MCHL second team, but this time
as a forward again.
The Cobalt, Ont. senior play-
ed with the 1948 Canadian
Olympic team.
Captain Johnny Matchefts and
stellar defenseman Alex "Herky"
will both be playing their final
contests in the Coliseum against
the Engineers this weekend.
In the only other MCHL action,'
Minnesota will play Michigan
State at East Lansing tonight, the
contest finishing both clubs Mid-
west League schedule.
MCHL Standings
W L Pts.
Minnesota 14 4 17*
North Dakota 11 5 17
MICHIGAN 10 4 15
Denver 10 6 15
Colorado College 4 10 8
1Michigan Tech 3 10 4
Michigan State 2 13 2.°
*not including last night's game
LATE HOCKEY SCORES
Minnesota 7, Michigan State 3
SDA Hears Talk
On Prague Trial
A small group of Students for
Democratic Action last night
heard Don Harris, national secre-
tary of the Socialist Youth League,
speak, on "The Political Signifi-
cance of the Prague Trial."
Harris, while pointing out the
anti-Semitic implications of the
trials, drew several parallels be-
tween these trials and the Rus-
sian purges of the thirties. Two of
the parallels cited were, "implica-
tion by co-conspirators" by which
those first arraigned implicate in
their testimonies new conspira-
tors, and the doubtfulness of the
charges and evidence.

Wolverine leers To Meet
Weak Michigan Tech Sextet
(ContinuedfromPage3)

'U' Doctor
Faces Quick
Deportation
The U. S. Immigration Depart-
ment has notified Chinese Dr.
Vera Hsi-Yet Wang Liu of the
Medical School's pediatrics de-
partment be ready for "voluntary
deportation in 30 days."
Bewildered by the order, Dr. Liu
said yesterday, "Not having any
home other than Ann Arbor, I
don't know where to turn."
"I don't have the slightest idea
why the decision was made," she
said.
Medical School officials have
helped Dr. Liu appeal to Congres-
sional Rep. George Meader who
has asked for a new report from
the immigration service and is
investigating the possibility of a
Justice Department appeal.
Dr. Liu, whose family is living
in this country, said she had made
application for permanent resi-
dence after her student visa ex-
pired, but it was denied without
explanation after a Detroit hear-
ing Jan. 23, 1952.
Spring Elections
Petitions Due Now
Only 33 persons have returned
petitions for 20 Student Legisla-
ture posts open in the spring all-
campus elections with today the
deadline for all petitions.
Candidates may make arrange-
ments to turn in petitions late
by calling Phil Berry, '53BAd., at
the SL Bldg.
So far, fifteen persons are com-
peting for nine J-Hop positions,
and four petitions have been re-
ceived for the Board in Control of
Student Publications.

'Oedipus' Opens Tonight
On Arts Theater Stage
41-

The fury of primitive emotionst
will explode in the classicalchar-
acted of Oedipus when the Arts
Theater stages its first production
of the Sophocles.play at 8:30 p.m.k
today at 209%/ E. Washington.-
Working with the barest of stage
props, five characters will trans-z
port their audience back through
Panel Will Discuss
Course Planning
"How to Plan a Course," the
second topic in the University's
forum on college and university
teaching, will be discussed at 3
p.m. today in Rackham Amphi-
theater.
Prof. Wilbert J. McKeachie of
the psychology department . will1
lead a panel composed of Prof.'
George A. Peek of the political
science department, Prof. Ronaldi
Freedman of the department oft
sociology and Prof. Lawrence B.1
Kiddle of the Spanish department.z

Y

the centuries into pre-Hellenistic
Greece.
THE TRAGEDY of Oedipus has
been taken as subject by numerous
authors who have attempted to
portray the man who unwittingly
married his mother.
The settings for the produc-
tion will consist of ten cubical
shapes of varying sizes. These
shapes are reminiscent of the
Stonehenge in England which
was probably a place of worship
for primitive man.
Costuming for the players will
consist of primitive garb, the main
characters wearing leopard and
wolf-skin clothing.
Strowan Robertson, director of
the play said, "We are not doing
"Oedipus" as a sophisticated play.
We hope to reduce the drama to a
more primitive level." He felt that
this will convey the dramatic im-
pact of Sophocles' masterpiece
more personally to the audience.

4.

WILLARD IKOLA
Sinjury-ridden

.

Pre-Law Club
Hears Speech
Pre-Law Crib members last
night heard William Flanagan, as-
sistant prosecutor of Wayne Coun-
ty, assert that a boy never gets in
trouble if he has a father who has
earned his respect.
Speaking on "Alleged Juvenile
Delinquents," Flanagan suggested
that people should worry less
about juvenile delinquency statis-
tics and concentrate on helping to
"give kids a break" themselves.
Flanagan stressed that juvenile
crime is no worse or more preva-
lent today than it has ever been.
"More things are called crimes and
there are more people today," he
said in explaining "higher delin-
quency rates."

"BEAT"
it over to the
LITTLE CLUB
" FLOOR SHOW
" ANN ARBOR
ALLEY CATS
MICHIGAN UNION

4 s

Friday Night

I

I'd

Riley's Capitol Market
Open every evening until 1 :00
Sunday until Midnight

ENTERTAINING NEEDS
FOR EVERY PARTY OCCASION

,

.

SUN * SURF * STUDY
SUMMER SCHOOL at the
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII
"All this and credits too"
MRS. MAE UFER MRS. MARIE NETTING
3-1813 2-2443

f

BEER * WINE * CHAMPAIGNE * LIQUOR
MEATS and GROCERIES

123 East Washington

p

.. .

__... .r._.

,1

1

*

7Ai4 Week at HILLL *

We Have Everything
in the way of career opportunities

ENGINEERS OF 52... THIS DESK IS

Friday Night Services ...............7:45 P.M.
RABBI ROBERT KATZ
"What We Live For As Jews"

* * *

* # * * # #

* *

RESERVED:
FrOR M#/

Sunday........................8:00 P.M.

;.;
;
: .
" r
.. f
} : M ,s
rf;.
J
/ ^ : "
..
F P
" ,. w

r'
r

'
r

I

YOU DON'T NEED A DEGREE IN
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING TO QUALIFY
Expanding and Diversified long range programs at Bell
Aircraft have opened exceptional opportunities in all fields
of engineering with this leading pioneer in the research
and development of Guided Missiles, Rocket Motors,
Supersonic Aircraft, and Airborne Electronic Equipment.
Bell is looking for the right men to work with leading
engineers in these fields while enjoying advantages of
high salaries, advancement, educational plans and other
benefits. This is your opportunity to get in on the

-\ --

i

r

PHONE
Sec'y, Electrical Eng.
3-1511, Ext. 443
Sec'y, Aeronautical Eng.
3-1511, Ext. 363
FOR APPOINTMENT

I

1

csrniinA iqnnr tntlncr fnr thr- Pnaini*Prinrr ndvanc.-q of to-

i

I

I

{'
s

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan