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March 01, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAYAC 1, 1953

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Campus Becomes Battlefiel in an

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* , * *

TArmy Cadets Carry Out
'Operation Mouse Trap'
Unnoticed except by a few startled passers-by, junior Army
ROTC students laid seige to the campus Thursday and Friday.
In an elaborate maneuver designed to bring theoretical lessons
into practical focus, three classes of more than 30 members each
conducted "Operation Mouse Trap" at 8 a.m., 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.
both days.
UNDER SIMULATED conditions created by their instructors,
M/Sgt. Harry L. Schell and M/Sgt. William H. Drummond, the
future Army officers established an offensive against a mythical
aggressor force dug in at Felch Park near the Rackham Bldg.
The enemy was supposedly attempting an offensive designed
to capture the Rifle Range in the center of campus.
Moving out from the Range with a full array of weapons, the
cadets patrolled along the Diagonal and across N. University Ave. to
previously assigned positions bordering the naval gun in front of
North Hall.
Designated as "Mouse Trap" on the combat mnap, the naval gun
represented an enemy outpost with a machine gun manned by
eight men.
Bringing into action a 75 mm. recoiless rifle, a bazooka
(officially known as the 2.36 rocket launcher), an 81 mm. mortar

* * * *

e * *

IJ

.

* * *

CADETS MOVE OUT PAST CHEMISTRY BLDG.
WITH BAZOOKA GUNNER IN FOREGROUND ...
STUDENT AID ASKED :
County Red Cross Sets
1952 Goal at 70,400

The Washtenaw County chapter
of the American Red Cross will ask
students and citizens of Ann Arbor
and Washtenaw County to "Ans-
wer the Call" today as their
month-long 1953 fund drive gets
under way.
This year's goal has been set at
$70,400.
DURING LAST year's drive the
faculty and staff of the University
went well over their quota. The
University Hospital also had little
trouble reaching its goal.
But because of the disappoint-
ing showing of the student body,
cannisters will be replaced this
year by, direct solicitation wherev-
er possible, according to Jessie A.
Coller, drive chairman.
Letters will be sent to the
presidents of each housing unit
on campus, asking cooperation
SL Sets Deadline
For Film Ietitions
Only one week remains for cam-
pus organizations to petition for
sponsorship of Student Legislature
Cinema Guild movies to be shown
the last half of this semester and
the first half of the fall term.
Any recognized campus organ-
ization interested in sponsoring
one of the weekly film showings
can pick up a petition at the SL
Bldg. Completed petitions must be
returned on or before Thursday.
Autographed Copies
of
Allan Seager's
"Amos Berry"
Buy at
FO L LETT'S
State at North U.

in soliciting funds, in hope that'
the students will reach their
quota. It has been cut down to
half of last year's quota because
of the low amount contributed
by students then.
Pete Dow, '55, has been chosen'
as chairman of student solicita-
tion by the Washtenaw County
chapter. General chairman Mrs.
Coller is active in numerous civic
groups and was the first woman
ever to be elected to the County
Board of Supervisors.
* * *
THIS YEAR, at the request of
the Office of Defense Mobilization,
the National Research Council
and the National Foundation for
Infantile Paralysis, the Red Cross
has increased tits 1953 quota by
seven million dolars.
The increase was made in or-
dter to finance recreation facili-
ties for troops in Korea and for
the production of gamma glo-
bulin, a blood derivative now be-
ing used as a preventative for
paralysis in polio.
Main function of the organiza-
tion is to help families and in-
dividuals according to their im-
mediate needs in time of disaster.
Nearly 4,000 volunteers f r o m
Washtenaw County have perform-
ed duties ranging from canteen
service to reading to the blind.
Other services include enter-
tainment and instruction projects,
plus addi,ional programs provid-
ing nurses aides, motor service,
staff aid, Grey ladies, first aid and
home nursing.
Inter-Arts Tryouts
To Be Held Today
Tryouts will be held at 2:30 p.m.
today in the League for the Inter-
Arts Union play, "The Late He
and She," which will be performed
as part of the Inter-Arts Festival
March 27 and 28.
Any student is eligible to try out.
The play, written by Robert
Rice, '54, is based on the life of
F. Scott Fitzgerald, noted English
writer.
Lucille Cowen, Grad., will direct
the production.

and a 30 cal. heavy ma'chinery
gun, the cadets quickly over ran
and wiped out "Mouse Trap"
and proceeded to the' main
enemy position in Felch Park.
There the mythical aggressor
battalion was firmly entrenched
with heavy weapon support. By
tactical maneuver and fire power,
cadets established their own po-
sitions on the park's fringes and
swept forward with fixed bay-
onets to rout the foe.
M/Sgts. Drummond and Schell
coordinated the maneuver with
radio "walkie-talkies." Each ca-
det was assigned a specific func-
tion or mission from the platoon
leader down to ammunition bear-
ers and was graded on his per-
formance.
The practical exercise conclud-
ed a three-week course in tactical
use and functioning of heavy
crew-served weapons.

READ and USE
DAILY C LASS IF IEDS

SETTING OFF ATTACK ON "MOUSE TRAP".

AND CADETS WAIT TO MAKE FINAL ASSAULT

DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE

........

Fountain Pens
School Supplies

'4

AS MISGT. SCHELL RADIOS
COMMANDS . . .

Events of the Week

Pictures by
MALCOLM SHATZ
Story by
HARRY L UNN

Typewuite
-= Tape Fs&
Recorde
Desks
Files
Since MORRILL'S l
1908 314 S. State
OPEN SATURDAYS
UENTIL 5 P.M.

es
s

Phone
7177

MONDAY
"Faust," presented by the De-
partment ofSpeech and School of
Music, 8 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, continuing through Wed-
nesday.
Choral Union Concert by the
Gershwin Concert Orchestra, 8:30
p.m., Hill Auditorium.
Basketball game with Purdue
University, 8 p.m., Yost Field
House.
Public Tours
New 'U' Clinic
More than 800 visitors yester-
day attended the open house of
the University Hospital's new
three million dollar Outpatient
Clinic.
Clinic staffers led tours through
the seven-story building, which
was opened for use in January.
The structure was built with the
aim of combining pleasant, mo-
dern surroundings with a maxi-
mum of efficiency in space and
equipment. It includes, in addi-
tion to the 24 separate specialty
clinics, a 24-hour-a-day emergen-
cy service and four fully equipped
operating rooms.
In addition to the physicians
serving the clinic, an estimated 300
nurses, technicians and office staff
members help take care of the
3,000 to 4,000 patients weekly.

TUESDAY
First Mott Foundation lecture
by Barbara Ward Jackson, assist-
ant editor of the London "Econ-
omist," on "Are Today's Basic
Problems Religious?" 8 p.m.,
Rackham Lecture Hall.
WEDNESDAY
Lecture on "Advertising," pre-
sented by the Department of Jour-
nalism, by Joseph H. Epstein, 3
p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
Lecture on "Some Problems of
Investment in Underdeveloped
Areas," by Barbara Ward Jackson,
presented by the Economics Club,
8 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater.
THURSDAY
Second Mott Foundation lecture
on "Moral Order in an Uncertain
World," by Barbara Ward Jack-
son, 8 p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall.
* * *

- WHILE MACHINE GUN TEAM DIGS IN AT FELCH PARK ...
Zahn Denies New Tightening
Of City. Fire Code on Campus.

~

Advertised in MADEMOISELLE,,
CHARM, GLAMOUR,

1

Reports that city fire regula-
tions are receiving much tighter
enforcement at campus functions
than they have during recent
years were denied yesterday by
Fire Chief Ben J. Zahn.
"We have always checked cam-
pus plays, movies and dances to
see that regulations are being ob-
served," Chief Zahn said.
* * *
JUST THIS WEEK, he pointed
out, inspectors thecked a com-
plaint that too large an orchestra
was being used in the presentation
of "Faust" at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater. When they found a slight
blocking of exits, arrangements
were made to correct the viola-
tion, according to Chief Zahn.

fireproof, and other campus
dances get the same check.
Student Legislature Cinema
Guild movies also get an occa-
sional routine inspection by de-
partment officers as do city
amusement places.
A definite fire code is written
into city laws and all groups are
required to abide by it in pre-
senting dances, plays and other
entertainment. The fire depart-
ment makes a close check on all
these events since many people are
unfamiliar with the laws, Chief
Zahn said.

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