100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 27, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

} PAGE STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1953

PAGE SIX FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1953

SOLUTION MAY BE NEAR:
City Garbage Disposal Causes Trouble

By HARRY LUNN
Ann Arbor's garbage disposal
dilemma may move to some solu-
tion in the near future.
Both the City and the Univer-
sity now sell their garbage to con-
tractors who dispose of the bulk of
it raw to farmers for hog feed..
BUT A PROPOSED State law
which would end feeding of raw
garbage to hogs, and heavy at-
acks of a hog disease called vesi-
cular exanthema may bring about
a change in disposal methods.
Local farmers are up in arms
about losses suffered from the di-
sease which has resulted in a
State quarantine of several farms.
They have suggested the City is
guilty of a legal nuisance in con-
tinuing present disposal methods.
City officials have long been
trying to acquire sanitary land
fills for disposal, but townships
around the city have been un-
willing to have fills within their
boundaries.
"Concern of township officials
is not warranted on the basis of
fact," commented Prof. Earnest
Boyce, chairman of the civil en-
gineering department. "The san-
itary fill method is very satisfac-
tory when properly used."
City engineers are now investi-
gating possible land sites, and
under a 1952 charter amendment,
condemnation of land outside the.
city may be possible.
University garbage is picked
up by two hog farm owners who
make regular collections at the
Union, League, University Hos-
pital and the residence halls, ac-
cording to Herbert P. Wagner,
Food Service business manager.
The proposed law before the
Legislature is given a good chance
of passage, and will automatically
end sales of raw garbage.
An estimated 65 per cent of gar-

*, * .
s.......
:, ......A....
.f
Si:" Si: ' J o- :.',% is~;"' + ,
r k" t :-i
...,.....:

Gershwin
Orchestral
.Concert Set
The recently-formed Gershwin
Concert Orchestra will appear in
the eighth Choral Union program
of the season at 8:30 p.m. Mon-
day in Hill Auditorium.
The idea for the formation of
the orchestra originated from a
conversation between concert
manager Andre Mertens and the
composer's sister, Frances *Gersh-
win.
A YEAR OF planning with Ira
Gershwin and Robert Russell Ben-
nett, who arranged and orchestra-
ted much of . Gershwin's music,
took place before the music group
actually formed last year.
Concert pianist Jesus Maria
Sanroma, who was the jazz ex-
ponents friend and protege, will
be instrumental soloist with the
Orchestra.
American soprano Carolyn Long
and baritone Theodor Uppman,
who scored a personal triumph in
the title role of Benjamin Britten's
opera "Billy Budd" in its London
world premiere, will do the vocal
solos.
Included in the Gershwin Con-
cert Festival will be "Concerto in
F for Piano and Orchestra," "An
Americanin Paris," "Rhapsody in
Blue" and songs from the com-
poser's musical comedies.
Tickets for the program will be
on sale in the Musical Society's
Burton Tower box office from 9 to
11:45 a.m. and from 1 to 4:45 p.m.I

Camus

Offe rs

Wide

I

Variety of Occu-mpations

A
.4
'4

*

*

*

Students working for the extra money that comes in so handy
can be found in almost every occupation from experimenting with
nuclei for the zoology department to giving bridge lessons.
The Personnel Bureau in the Administration Bldg., which has
a complete list of campus jobs, is coordinating agency for employers
and job-seekers,
INS'YEAD OF going directly to prospective entployers, the student
is advised to come to the Bureau before personally making the rounds,
E. L. Brigham, supervisor of employment, emphasized.
"The outlook for jobs is still pretty good, although there are
still more students available than positions open," Brigham said.
Most demands for men come
from the plant department, while
women can be placed easiest in
clerical posts, according to Brig-
. a

A.

-Daily--Stu Ross

* * *

bage in the State is fed to hogs,
according to City Engineer George
Sandenburg, who expects the city
to utilize land fills in the near
future.
Presumably the University would
go along in a cooperative project
with the City if the legislation re-
ceives passage although no formal
discussions have been held, Ald.
A. D. Moore said last night.
Museum To Show
Two FilmsToday
"Making Maple Syrup" and
"Osmosis" are the movies to be
presented under the auspices of
the University museums at 7:30
p.m. today in Kellogg Auditorium.

'U' To Feature
Arab-Israel
On Roundtable
"The Future of Arab-Israeli Re-
lations" will be the topic discussed
on International Roundtable, a
program at 9:30 p.m. today over
WUOM.

DURING vacations the bureau
places applicants in full time jobs
here, but Brigham thinks it is
too hard on the student to carry
a complete class schedule and a
full-time job during the semester.
Although the Personnel "Bureau
is a campus service, both outside
job hunters and employers use its
facilities. But students and Uni-
versity needs are given priority,
Mrs. Wolf, interviewer, said.
.Story by
HELENE SIMON
Pictures by
TIM RICHARD

4

'CHECK YOUR COAT, SIR?' PERSONNEL INTERVIEWER

YOU cn stop
your running
when you buy
at the
114 E. William St.
Between Main and
Founrth Ave.
PHONE 7191
Sundays Noon to 7 P.M.
OPEN
Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. We have ICE CUBES

j
1
a
1
1
3
c
t

Students from foreign lands are today and Monday and from 9 to
given an opportunity on Interna- 11:45 a.m. tomorrow.
tional Roundtable to tell about1
their countries, and their views on 11
world affairs. Youth To Hear
Topics to be discussed in the
next few weeks will range from " ncer Today
onies in Africa," "A Description
of Korea" and "Religion and F o u r thousand Washtenaw
the State" to "The Sources of county grade school children will
National Poetry," "National gather at 2 p.m. today in Hill
Forms of Music" and "Is Love Auditorium for their second an-
International?" In addition to nual symphony concert.
these, individual countries will The performance will feature
be talked about separately. the 60-piece Ann Arbor Civic
Michael Faber, graduate of Ox- Symphony Orchestra, conducted
ford University and producer and by Orien Dalley, music director of
moderator of the program, said he WUOM.
will gratefully receive names of The program will be broadcast
those who would like to partici- over WUOM, and climaxes a ra-
pate and also suggestions for fur- dio series, "Voices of the Orche-
ther topics of discussion. tra," used in classrooms through-
He is particularly interested in out the county.
those who read national poetry or The 4,000 elementary school
play national instruments. Faber youngsters will join their voices
can be reached at 611 Church St. with the orchestra in "Battle
or phoned at 3-2882. Hymn of the Republic" and the
Mexican dance song, "Chiapan-
READ and USE ecas."
The program is open to the
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS Fpublic.
11h1rt

I

{

BRIDGE INSTRUCTOR EXPLAINS FINE POINTS OF THE GAME TO EAGER PUPILS

LIBRARY EMPLOYE PUTS
BOOK IN DUMBWAITER

f1

i

Simon and Schuster
announces with pride
the publication, today, of
Allan
Seager' s
superb new novel
AMOS BERRY
By the author of Equinox,
rTbo 'T-n/~rit /n ar

are
the-
detaifs
MM THE SEASON'S SMARTEST
NEW SUIT STYLING BY
i4
b-Amply wide shoulders
2-Narrower lapels
3-Natural built-up chest
4-Rolled sleeves

HOSPITAL ORDERLY TAKES A PATIENT FOR A WALK

SOME DON WHITE COATS FOR KITCHEN DUTY

xi

A

i

:::s .;:::>;:f:

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan