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February 25, 1953 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-02-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1953

_______________________________________________________________________________ U U
I.

. ...:

N

TAGUIB'S REFORMS:
Ramnzi Talks on Egyptian Government

Y t

By DOROTHY MYERS
"Egypt's government have had
a great amount of corruption in
the past, but its citizens now have
complete trust in Naguib and the
future," Mohammed Tawfik Ram-
zi, assistant professor at Fouad I
University in Cairo, claimed yes-
terday.
Egyptians consider Naguib, their
present premier, a sincere and hon-
est patriot with no personal aims
of aggrandizement, Ramzi said in
a lecture at the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
* * *
- A VISITING lecturer in the
political science department, Ram-
zi added that no ruler or Egyp-'
tian desires the presence of Brit-
ish control. "We have respect for
British character, dignity and tra-
dition of freedom, as properly ex-
ercised at home," he declared.
"The Communist danger in
Egypt is now being lessened by
intelligent methods, Ramzi said.
Moscow has been exceedingly
hostile to the land reforms un-
dertaken by Naguib, he claimed.
Ramzi added that the Com-

t- -
recent religious persecutions in
Russia would promote better rela-
tions between Israel and the Arab
states in the Near East.
Another finans being used to
fortify Egypt against potential
Communist agressors is better
popular education, Ramzi claim-
ed.
A Middle East Defense Organ-
ization, similar to the North At-
lantic Treaty Organization, has
been suggested by Western ambas-
sadors, Ramzi said, but it could not
become effective until NATO is
fully unified. At the present time
it would take only four months
for the Russians to invade Egypt."
he asserted.
Ramzi refused to predict the out-
come of a future Sudan plebicite,
when the people of that region
will vote whether to tie themselves
to Egypt, to England or to re-
main independent. "There is nat-
ural unity between the Sudan and
Egypt," Ramzi claimed, "but if the
Sudanese should prefer to remain
separate, the Egyptians will cer-
tainly not interfere."

SPA Peace,
Conference
To Begin
The Society for Peaceful Alter-
natives' peace conference will get
underway with the showing of
three films at 8 p.m. today in Au-
ditorium C of Angell Hall.
There will be a 25c admission
charge for the movies, "No Place
to Hide," "Peace Will Win" and
"A Time for breatnews."
* * *
THE AIM OF the four-day con-
ference is to stimulate students to
think about ways of achieving
peace, according to SPA president
Paul Dormont, '55.
Rev. Charles A. Hill of the
Hartford Baptist Church in De-
troit will continue the confer-
ence with a talk on "Peace is
Impossible under the Present
United States Foreign Policy"
at 8 p.m. tomorrow in Kellogg
Auditorium.
Further plans call for a faculty
discussion panel on methods of
obtaining peace at 2:30 p.m. Sat-
urday in the Union.
Prof. Kenneth Boulding of the
economics department, Prof. Pres-
ton Slossen of the history depart-
ment and Prof. John Shepard of
the psychology department will
take part in the panel.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

-Daily-Harvey Price
PROF. RAMZI
munists blasted Naguib's govern-
ment when it took over large land
estates and distributed them
among the people. Approximately
one million acres of land thus
distributed had belonged to just
six families he said.
* *T *
RAMZI PREDICTED that the

i

Civic Theater Regarded
As Young Actor's Hope

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication-in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday.)
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1953
Vol. LXII, No. 96
Notices
Student Tea. President and Mrs.
Hatcher will be at home to students
from 4 to 6 o'clock, Wednesday, Feb.
25.
Regents' Meeting, Fri., March 20, at
10 a.m. Communications for considera-
tion at this meeting must be in the
President's hands not later than March
12.
Will anyone who knows the where-
abouts of Yvonne Arnold, Nancy Lynn,
or Lee N. Arnold, or has information
concerning them, please communicate
with Frank J. Landgraf, Unclaimed
Equities Division, Prudential Insurance
Company, Newark, New Jersey.
Late permission for women students
who attended the University Symphony
Orchestra concert on Thurs., Feb. 19,
will be no later than 11:10 p.m.
Juniors wishing to enter the Honors
Program in Psychology for the year
1953-54 should apply by letter to Dr. W.
J. McKeachie. Chairman, Honors Com-
mittee, Department of Psychology, on
or before April 3.
Veterans who have been certified for
education and training allowance under
Public Law 550 must get instructors'
signatures on Dean's Monthly Certifica-
tion for February and return that form
to appropriate Dean's office on or be-
for March 3. VA Form 7-1996a must be
filled in and signed by each certified
veteran in the Office of Veterans' Af-
fairs, 555 Administration Building, be-
tween 8 a.m. March 2 and 5 p.m.
March 6.
Personal Interviews. Mr. Glen Bower-
sox, Midwest Field Representative of the
Institute of International Education,
wishes to meet all Institute-related for-
eign students during the week of Mar.
2 to 6, at a meeting of all such students
at the International Center at 7:30
p.m. on Mon., Mar. 2; by appointment
through Mrs. Mead at International
Center, phone 3-1511, Ext. 358, through-
out the week. Mr. Bowersox may also
be consulted by any foreign student or
others requiring information or guid-
ance.
Continental Insurance Companies of
Chicago have representatives on cam-
pus today and tomorrow interested in
talking to June graduates in Liberal
Arts for claims, underwriting and ad-

CLASSIFIE DS

justing work and also actuarial and
accounting students. Appointments
may be made by calling Ext. 2686, or if
additional information, is wanted, con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, Ext.
371.
Summer Employment,
Bureau of Appointments' weekly sum-
mer employment meeting will be held
Thursday from 1 to 5 p.m. in Room
3-A, Michigan Union, for all students
interested in camp, resort, business, or
industrial positions this year. Requests
are particularly heavy for camping per-
sonnel and undergraduate technical
people for industry.
Childcraft, a Marshall Field Enter-
prise, will have a representative intRoom
3-B. Michigan Union, from 1 to 5 p.m.
Thursday to talk to all students inter-
ested in a sales career this summer.
Pure Oil Company, of Chicago, will
hold a group meeting next Mon., Mar.
t 24 p,aa2abfi
2, 'at 4 p.m. in 4051 Administration
Building for undergraduate engineers,
chemists, geologists, physicists, and
business administration students inter-
ested in summer employment.
For further information about, sum-
mer employment, contact the Bureau
of Appointments, Ext. 2614, or call at
the office, 3528 Administration Build-
ing.
Personnel Interviews.
The Air Reduction Co., of New York
City, will have a representative on the
campus on Mon., Mar. 2, to talk to
men graduating in June interested in
Sales, Operating, Distribution, Finance,
and General Executive Departments.
The Pure Oil Co., of Chicago, will
have an interviewer at the Bureau.of
Appointments on Mon., Mar. 2, to see
June graduates for their Management
Training Program for positions of
Salesmen, Business Administration,
Accountants, and Geologists. Also Mon-
day afternoon at 4 p.m. in 4051 Admin-
istration Building the representatives
would like to see candidates interested
in summer employment. They have
openings for Chemical, Mechanical, and
Civil Engineering Juniors and for Ac-
countants and Business Administra-
tion Juniors.
There will be a representative from
the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Crystal
City, Mo., on Mon., Mar. 2, in the morn-
ing and all day Tues., Mar. 3. The in-
terviewer is interested in talking to
June graduates for positions in Ac-
counting, Industrial Management, and
Personnel.
The Ethyl Corporation, of New York
City, will be here on Tues., Mar. 3, to
interview Accountants for their Inter-
nal Audit staff.
The Connecticut General Life In-
surance Co., of Hartford, Conn., will
have a representative here on Wed.,
Mar. 4, to see June graduates for var-
ious positions within this firm.
Lumbermens Mutual Casualty Co.,
of Chicago, will be here on Thurs., Mar,
5, and is interested in seeing June
graduates for positions in Underwrit-
ing, Claim Adjusting, Accounting, Sta-
tistics, and Auditing.
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 PM.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1:96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 90 2.24 3 92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
FOR SALE
CANARIES-Young singers and females.
Baby parakeets. 562 S. Seventh. Ph.
3-5330. )22F
PARAKEETS, babies and breeders, ca-
naries, singers, cages and supplies. 305
W. Hoover. Phone 2-2403. )IF
CAMERA-Retina LIA, F2 xenon coated
lens, fully syncronized. Never been
used. With case $145 by owner. 2-1946.
)21F
ROOMS FOR RENT
IS YOUR ROOM too small, and dark,
your bed too short, too much noise
where you live? Then see the 2 single
rooms, one with full sized bed, in
Quiet private home. Phone mornings
or evenings 2-5152. )11D
ROOMS FOR OVERNIGHT GUESTS-
Reserve rooms now at The Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State.) Phone 3-8454, )3D
SUITE to share with board. 520 Thomp-
son. )8D
SINGLE Hollywood bed, modern bath
facilities. Maid service. Refrigerator
privileges. Near campus. Call 2-7108.
) 7D
PERSONAL
ALL FORMER Texas Aggies: Contact
Ray Champion for Aggie Muster, April
21. Call 3-1480 immediately. )4P
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Driver to Washington State,
new Plymouth station wagon. Car
expenses paid; call daytime 2-4561.
evening 2-4019. )2T
HELP WANTED
TYPING JOB for person who is able
to read French script readily. Call
7953 preferably after 2 p.m. )18H
RARE SUMMER OPPORTUNITY
FOR MEN AND WOMEN9
to earn enough money for school next
fall, while gaining in valuable career
experience. Ask for Mr. Gibson, Mich.
Union-summer placement. Thurs.,
Feb. 26, 1-5 P.M. )13H

HELP WANTED
BOY'S WORKER, afternoons 1-5. Three
evenings 5:30 to 8:00. Must swim and
drive car. College graduate preferred.
$66 per week if qualified. Box No. 6.
) 17H
BUSINESS SERVICES
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono & TV
Fast & Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO & T Vi
"1Student Service"
1215 So. Uni., Ph. 7942
11a bloc s east of East Eng. )1B
TYPEWRITERS! Portableand Standard
for rent. sale and service
Morrill's
314 S. State St., Phone 7177. 2B
WASHING -- Finished work and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. .- 5B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; Shorts,' 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )7B
EXPERT TYPIST - Rates reasonable.
Prompt service. 914 Mary. Street.
3-4449. )8B
WANTED TO BUY
LOW PRICED lightweight bike. Call
Ken Tindell 8-993. )4W

I

IN PERSON
DIRECT FROM HIS
CBS TELEVISION SHOWA

FEATURED IN FULL ARTICLES IN
Saturday Evening Post ...
Life . . . Look . . . Collier's
HILL AUDITORIUM
Fri., Feb. 27 8:15 P.M.
Tickets: Reserved Seats $1.25
Unreserved Seats $1.00, 75c
Now On Sale
ADMINISTRATION BLDG.
I.
s

By MARK READER
"The hope of any young actor or
director lies in community theater
work," says Ken Rosen, one of the
newest and hardest working mem-
bers of the Arts Theater.
Rosen, who joined the ranks of
the theater shortly before he grad-
uated from the University earlier
this month, has already become
one of the key figures in the group.
* * *
ASIDE from appearing in his
present comedy role of Dogberry
in the theater's production of
Shakespeare's "Much Ado About
Nothing," Rosen is busily rehears-
ing for a more serious part in
Sophocles' "Oedipus Rex," and is
in the process of organizing and
directing his third play for the
Children's Theater.
Boston-born Rosen, who origi-
nated the idea of a community
children's theater here in Ann
Arbor elims he began to real-
ize the importance of childrens'
participation in dractics when
he was acting with the Tributary
Theater in Boston. At that time
he appeared in at least thirty
different roles ranging from the
famed Huck Finn to the second
witch in Shakespeare's Macbeth.

Three summers in stock brought
Rosen into contact with some of The conference wi
the most famed names in the the- I with a student panel
ater. He appeared with Burgess: States policy for best
Meredith, Nancy Walker and Bert the aims of peace at
Lahr in several performances. Ro- Sunday in the Union.
sen says he got his basic training Panel members will
working with these people. Lapham, '54, Buddha
* * * darag, Grad., and Wal
HE BEGAN as an apprentice, 53L.
painting scenery and finally!
worked his way up to the position
of stage manager. D

Il conclude
on United
furthering
2:30 p.m.
be Robert
V. Govin-
ter Hansen,

READ'
and
USE
Daily
C lassifieds

In 1950, Rosen transferred
from Boston University where
he had been preparing himself
for a career in business, and en-
rolled as a speech major here.
Some of the most hectic years,
in his short theatrical life followed.
He got parts in the Student Play-
ers' production of "Finians Rain-
bow," in "Venus Observed" pre-
, , ,

ENDING TODAY
"MAGNIFICENT! AMONG
THE BEST OF 1952!"
-Cue Magazine

F

"1 Z .A.V. 1.,+1 0
Students with driving permits
should report their new license
plate number, changes in ad-
dress and any other changes in
their driving permit form, ac-
cording to Karl Streiff, assist-
ant to the Dean of Students.
The information, needed to
bring records up to date, may
be mailed or turned into
Rm. 1020 Administration Bldg.
Streiff said permits issued in
the fall run, automatically un-
til June.
Editor To Give
ReligionTalks
Barbara Ward Jackson, author
and assistant editor of The Econ-
omist Magazine will open a year-
ly series of religious talks Tuesday.
Her lecture at 8 p.m. in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall will deal with{
the religious implication of the
Communist challenge to the free
world. The first such talk will be
"Are Today's Basic Problems Re-

LcN~ ADaily From
h TODAY. :3
"Pungent Force-Crisp . . . Satiric Overtones"
-N.Y. Post
An impudent new gaiety from the Tight Little Island!

.

,

N

I

A FOUR-SQUARE LOOK
at a Happy Marriage!
(Most of the Time!)

A .
r

II I

p.,

Admission Always 44c
STARTS TODAY

"A ,4Loto
~01

f Fun"
Vs Week

THE
SCANDINAVIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Victor Kolar, Conducting
SOLOIST - CAROLYN JEWELL, PIANIST
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN STUDENT
TICKETS:
11 Ientcr Rows Main Floor, First 3 Rows Balcony $2.25
Last 9 Rows Main Floor, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th rows Balcony $1.75
First 4 Rows Main Floor, Last 2 Rows of Balcony $1.25
SATURDAY, FEB. 28, 8:30 P.M.
THE DETROIT INSTITUTE OF ARTS
Woodward at Kirby
Mail or Phone Your Reservation:
Mrs. Knut Poppe - k7328 Cherry Lawn, Detroit 21
University 1-4496 or Kenwood 2-2833

K
. .

'IRV l? N T'

E n u acor ligious?"
.new actor
* . , A week later she will speak on
he Ann Arbor Dramat- "Moral Order in an Uncertain
Aristophanes' comedy World."

LII

sented by t
ic group.,

to

1N"

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f

Rex'
HARRIS

"The Birds" and also had time to
aid in the direction of the Gil-
bert and Sullivan Society's opera
"Yeoman of the Guard."
After this, he received his cur-
rent role in "Much Ado" with the
Arts Theater. One of Rosen's fu-
ture aims is to work for the decen-
tralization of the theater so that
more actors will be able to find
employment and small communi-
ties throughout the country will
have the opportunity to view top-
notch theatrical performances.

The series of yearly talks is be-
ing sponsored by the Mott Foun-
dation of Flint.
The English woman is the au-
thor of "The West at Bay" and
"Policy for the West."

JES r40 TN*r
r~raia# ^% rll "DISARMINGLY'

COMING SATURDAY

Lilli
PALMER
THE
A COLOMAA PiCTUiE
TOMORROW-THURSDAY
I DON'T CARE GIRL
PLUS SNEAK PREVUE

BLACK
MAGIC

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Uk

mmmmmmmd

11

T AIrUE U. P.M.44c
TODAY Until 5 P.M.

i

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Added Cartoon
Adult 44 c
Admission

:4

mmmmmwmmll

4
4
4
4
4

EXTENDED BY POPULAR DEMAND
WED. - THURS. - FRI. - SAT.
SHAKESPEARE
"MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING"
Because of the large number of people who want to see
this production, and the many members who have ex-
pressed the desire to see the play again, "Much Ado"
has been extended.
THE ARTS THEATER
Ann Arbor's Professional Arena Theater

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