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February 24, 1953 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-02-24

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TUSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1953

PAGE TWREW

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
___________________________________________________________________ I I

PAd~R T1IRI~R

SPORTS SLANTS
.By Ed Whipple
Those with the biggest mouths generally get the most attention,
which is fine sometimes, and not too fine on other occasions, as Michi-
gan State has just found out.
It's hard to find any sympathy for the Spartans' cause, whether
they are guilty of any more misdeeds than some other members of
the Big Ten or not. State has claimed there are other schools violating
That matbensbut this is the fundamental difference between
them and Michigan State: The unnamed offenders have at least
had the good intelligence to keep their mouths shut as they went
about recruiting. The Spartans, on the other hand, have gone
about their business in such blatant style no one could mistake
their purpose.
Further, President John Hannah hasn't been content to
quietly condone illegal subsidization under his own nose; he has
seen fit to play the hypocrite, proclaiming a deemphasis program
to the academic world. Hlere are two of his more recent mouthings,
as chairman of the American Council on Education's group named
to recommend sports reform:
"Recruiting and subsidization remains the basic problem; I hope
it will be slowed down by the college presidents. The only decent thing.
to do is to give the conferences, the NCAA, and the accrediting
agencies a chance to see what they can do."
And when Hannah asked for MSC's admission into the Big Ten
in 1947, he declared, "The evil is what is done beyond the realm
of scholarship admI b durilissions.... Imean by alumni groups, indutilcon-
cerns, downtown coaches and so on... -"
All this comes from a man whose school has just been slapped
down for promoting an alumni dlub that helps athletes on the sly.
Now he says such action is "unwarranted and unjustified."
In other words, the Spartans were asking for it, with a capital
"A."
They have denied any official connection with the Spartan
Club, yet the MSC alumni Field Secretary has damitted signing a
letter asking for $100 contributions to the Spartan Foundation,
with a secret practice pass as the return for kickins.
* * * *
The State News, MSC student newspaper, contends its school has
been convicted without evidence. Yet the books of the Spartan Foun-
dation have disclosed over $17,000 disbursed to unidentified sources be-
tween July 1951, and July, 1952, after the club had supposedly dis-
banded. Even Hannah won't tell where that went.
$3800 more was given to football players, including Don Cole-
man and Al Dorow, whose eligibility had run out. The Conference
reasoned if Michigan State could afford to spend that on has-beens,
what must they be giving to those still eligible? Which is a very
reasonable question, yet to be answered by the East Lansing folks, who
usually have the answer to everything.
What did the Spartan Foundation dow ith its money? Did it
buy manure spreaders or milking machines? Did It buy canoes for
the Red Cedar? Pin ball machines for the Union? Until MSC can
show that the Spartan Foundation did NOT use its funds for re-
cruiting athletes, the whole outfit deserves what It has already
received and more too.
Technically, the "probation" means nothing, as any literate
person can read from the news stories. Practically, it means mil-.~
lions in bad publicity, which undoes all the propaganda Michigan
State has worked so hard to spread the past five years,
Hannah has been gallavanting here, there, and everywhere. He
has dabbled in polhtics enough to get himself a federal cabinet post
because heis an "outstanding educator." Michigan State has been sold
as a well-rounded educational institution, both to the nation and the
people of the state of Michigan, when it approximates a glorified foot-
ball factory. -4
Well, that's all down the drain now, and good riddance. Mich-
igan State has no one to blame but itself. And they should have
learned that talk Is not always cheap, even when it comes from
East Lansing.
8 5-84 Win Over Wolverines

Back Coach
Takes Grid
Job at USC
George Ceithaml, for the past
five years a member of the Mich-
igan football coaching staff, an-
nounced yesterday that he had
accepted the position of backfield
coach at the University, of South-
eCeitham tutored the Wolverine
backs for te past four seasons aft-
the jayvee gridders. In his playing
days at Michigan he quarterbacked
the 1940-41-42 squads under H. 0.
"Fritz" Crisler and captained the
team in his senior year.
* * *
THE YOUTHFUL coach said
hhe was leaving Ann Arbor
"ihgreat reluctance since all of
my playing and coaching exper-
ience has been at Michigan." He
professed his debt to such fine
coaches as Crisler and Benny Oos-
first as a player and later as a
coach.'
Following in the tradition of
such ' great Michigan quarter-
backs as Benny Friedman and
Harry Newman, Ceithami es-
tablished his own niche in Wol-
verine football history on the
strength of his expert Isignal
calling and heads-up play.
His greatest game'was aint
Notre Dame in 1942 while hge was
captaining the Maize and Blue
eleven to a seven won, three lost
record. In that contest, generally
regarded as a masterpiece of quar-
terbacking, he led the Wolverines
to a 32-20 victory over the highly-
touted Irish-.
THE GREAT opportunity that
was open to him in California
guiding the Trojan gridders was
further enhanced by the fact that
relatives and frends on the coast.
The exodus of the stocky-ex-
quarterback to Los Angeles leaves
a void in the Wolverines' grid
brain trust. As yet nobody has
been chosen to succeed him, and
head coach Oosterbaan said that
"we're very sorry to lose George,
we'll miss him--he's done a fine
fields for the i ast four season.
Oosterbaan went on to say that
"I know the staff joins me in wish-
ing him well at his now post."
I-M Scores
WATER POLO FINALS
ChcALL-CAMPUS PADDLEBALL
Weinstock-MltcheUl 2, Pearlinan-Roy-
ner 1
BASKETBALL
SCtandlrlt yns 40o, Hawalians 21
Lucky seven 49, Kappa Alpha Psi 22
Newman Club 59, Actuaries 17
Wesleyan 23, Prsytersanr 1
MCF 44, Canterbury 36
ERi defeated Read's Raiders (for-
feit)
Chi Psi 3, Gamma Delta 2
Sigma Clhi 4, Newman Club 2
What's the Greatest
SPORT Magazine

Here's your chance to be
a sportswriter ! If you are
n ot a polishe d w riter,
don't wor.SPORT is
ing spot moments tod
in detail.
For contest rmles
Get March
At Your Newsstand Now

Natators Swamp
Minnesota, 67-26
Mich'ga Swim er Brek Three31WillifSESTC
U.S.C~l Rcrs in Pre-M.eet Foray

BACK IN ST RIDE:
'M' Pucksters Hustle to Twin Victory

By IVAN KAYE
migeam crushed a hapless Mn
nesota squadose 67-2,esterday~ for
victory of the season.
The Wolverines took nine of the
ten events, yielding only in the
440 yard freestyle where Gopher
captain Dave Anderson nipped
Maize and Blue chieftain Wally
Jeffries by less than six inches.
THE HIGH-spirited Michigan
squad experienced its toughest
cdmpetition from the clock in a
pre-meet record-breaking foray
which found no less than 18 of
Matt Mann's disciples engaging
in a mile swim.
The old Yale record for the
event was lowered to 15:34.9
from its original 15:46.8. In the
same race, Yale records for the
500 and 600 yard distances were
also smashed. The new time for
the 500 was 4:16.5, and for the
600 was 5:10.0.
After polishing off the Eli rec-
ords, the Maize and Blue swim-
mers took coach Niels Thorpe's
Gophers completely in stride.
JOHN CHASE, Tom Case and
Johnny flies led off with a handy
victory in the 300 yard medley re-
lay, and from that point on the
only question was the size of the
final score.
Established performers Don
Hill, Ron Gora, Tom Benner
and Captain Jeifries dominated
the 50 and 220 yard freestyles to
put the Wolverine natators com-
pletely out of reach by the
Sophomore Ed Furdak of Dear-
born came along to capture the
150 yard individual medley with
Barry Wayburn grabbing second
from Gopher Rod Grubb. Way-
burn, the lad the doctors said
Wanit to travel

would never swim again, continues
tog mak s progress toward regain-
Mann seems to have a solid num-
Jones in the individual medley
BUD HURD and Andy White
ran one-three in the diving with
'Bob Curyfinihin seod for
Minnesota. Freshman Chris Kel-
ler. performing as an unofficial
fifth man, finished with the high-
est point total, 242.2.
Johny Ries and Pete Dow
finished one-two in the 100 yard
freestyle.
SophomorethGles Mile ad
backstroke races with Bob Marans
adding a third in the former event.
sUMMARIEs
300Yard Medley Relay: 1-Michigan
(Chase, Case, Ries), 2 -Minnesota,
220 YARD FREESTYLE: 1 - Gora
(lv), 2-Jeifries (M), 3-Anderson
(Minn.). Time: 2:12.4.
50 YARD FREESTYLE: i-Hill (M),
2-Ben ne4. (M), 3-Downig (Minn.).
iSO YARD INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY:
1-Furda (M), 2-Wayburn .(M), 3-
FAXNCY DIVING: 1-Hurd (M), 2-
Curry (Minn.), 3-White (M). Points: I
10 YARD FREESTYLE: 1 - Ries
(M), 2-Dow (M), 3-Downey (Minn.).
Time: 54.0.
200YAR BACKSTROKE: 1-Jones
(Minn.). Time: 2;15.2.
200 YARD BREAsTROKE: i-Miller I
(M) 2-Hel (Minn.), 3--Marans (M).
44 YARD' FREESTYLE: i-Ander-
son (Minn,), 2--Jeff ries (M), 3-Leen-
400 YAR) TFREESTYLE RELAY: 1--
Michigan (Ford, Chase, Dow, Ries),
2-Minnesota. Time: 3:39.7.

By HANLEY GURWIN
A determined Wolverine hockey
club returned to a contending po-
sition in the MCHL by handing
league-leading North Dakota two
setbacks in "blue chip" contests
this past week-end.
By winning its i'emaining three
can now do no worse tan tie with
Minnesot for the leagu cown
NCAA championships at Colorado
Springs.
MICHIGAN'S chances of win-
ning a playoff spot seemed rather
dim a 'week ago after the puck-
sters dropped a pair of contests to
the Gophers at Minnesota. How-
tirely tdifferent story as a hustlin,
alert playing Wolverine squad
completely dominated play to earn
5-3 and 8-3 victories over the
Sioux of North Dakota.
All three lines played excel-
lent hockey in the twin killings,
with several men doubling on of-
fensive and defensive units. The
newly formed second line of
Pat Cooney, Doug Mullen, and
George Chin accounted for sev-
yen goals while the number one
trio, Doug Philpott, John Mat-
chef ts, and Jim Haas, bagged
the other six. -
Mullen personally aided the
Wolverine cause by blinking the
red light on four occasions and
picking up assists on three other
goals. Captain Matchefts scored
three unassisted goals and also
pitched in to assist on two more.
TELLY MASCARIN, Ron Mar-
tinson, and Bert Dunn, plaigto-
gethr onth ne deehidtlie
accomplished the difficult task of
slowing down the big guns of the
Nodak attack.
AleX McClellan, playing with
a charley horse in his leg, turned
in one of the finest performances

ever witnessed at the Coliseum
in keeping the puck away from
Michigan goal.
Willard Ikola played remark-
able hockey in the nets for the
Wolverines in holding Nodak stars

in the driver's seat with three
games remaining to play while
North Dakota and Denver have al-
ready finished league competition
for the season.
Minnesota, currently tied with
the Nodaks on top of the league
standings, hassticompiled1
Sae. Doenver has complted t
season with a record of ten
wns8 and sx losses for a total
The Wolverines, who have piled
up 14 points on a 9-4 league rec-
ord, can add five more markcers
to their total by turning back
Michigan State once, and then
Michigan Tech in two two-point
Vic Heyliger's charges can grab
secnd place in the loop and an
invitation to the NCAA playoffs,
an event they hav won te pat
games with Tech.
hAIRSTYLES
COLLEGIATE CUTS
8AFOR SPR ING!!
8HIRCUTTERS-NO WAITING
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theater

DOUG MULLEN
- . . nodak nemesis
* * *
Bob Cherski and Ken Johannson
scoreless for two periods Satur-
day night. Bill Lucier, who re-.
placed Ikola during the third ses-
sion, performed equally well but
fell victim to two shots while the
Wolverines were shorthanded.
* *,
THE MAIZE and Blue puckmen,
though still resting in fourth place
in the MCHL s.tandings, are now

look neat 24 hours a day in our
with the soft collar that
wont nkle..wer

Take a university-sponsored
tour via TWA this summer
and earn full college credit
while you travel
Visii the countries of your choice
. tudy from 2 to 6 weeks at a
foreign university. You can do both
on one trip when you arrange a uini-
A frica. Special study tours available.
Low all-inclusive prices with TWA's
economical Sky Tourist service.
For information, write: John II.
Furhay, Pb.D., Director, Air World
Tfours, Dept. CN, 80 East 42nd St.
Ne ork 17, N. Y.Be sure to mn

Work 'won't wrinkle it
. perspiration won't
wilt it! Our wonderfui
V an Heusen CEN-
TURY shirt is the big-
gest contribution to
shirt neatness in 50
years. Van Heusen Cen-
tury shirt's patented col-
lar is woven in one
piece . .. can't be fold-
ed or ironed wrong. Yet
3.95 and 4.95

'1
*pt~.4"..

(Contillued from Page 1)
of the ball but tied It up for a cen-
ter jump as the clock showed five
seconds.
THE WILDCATS retained the
ball and the contest ended 85-84.
Milt Mead led the parade of
Michigan players which reached
double figures, chalking up 17
points before leaving the game
with eight minutes remaining.
The other four starters fill out
the list, Groff sky getting 16,
Codwell, 15, Eaddy, 15, and
Lawrence 11 points.
Northwestern again made use
of its tall twosmoe at center. 6-8
Frank Petrancek rang the nets
Harold Grant, 6-6, didreve bt
ter racking up 18 markers to fin-
ish behind Ehmann in the scoring
totals.
BIG TEN .BASKETBALL
Illinois 83, Minnesota 82
Michigan State 53, Wisconsin 45
Iowa 90, Ohio State 75
IndIana 113, Purdue 78

BOTH WILDCAT centers fouled
out, Grant being ejected with seven
minutes left and Petrancek, re-
turning to the game, stayed for

THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN

another four minutes then
lowed Grant's example.

fol-

S tIU0~

NORTHWESTERN FG.
Dellflid F 2
Ehmann, F 9
Petrancek, C 5
Grant, C 6
Bragiel, G 1
Kurka, G 1
Totals 28
MICHIGAN FG
Mead, F 7
CowlF 5
Kauffman, C 0
Eaddy, G 5
Lawrence, G , 3
Pavichevich, G 1
Kenaga, G 0
Totals 28
Northwestern 23
MICHIGAN 22

FT
6
4
5
6
3
4
29
FT
3
5
4
5
0
2
28
22
28

PF Pts.
4 10
5 22
., 15
6 18
4 5
5 6
32 85
PF Pts.
5 17-
4 15
5 16
5 15
5 11
2 2
0 2
29 84
31 9-85
22 12-84

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