100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 22, 1953 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1953-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1953

i

Professor

COMMUNISM IN THE NEAR EAST:

Cites Biased
'NegroMyth'
Historians and controllers of
the press are attempting to weak-
ern the Negro people and instill a
myth in Americans that Negroes
are docile and stupid, Prof. Her-
bert Aptheker of the Jefferson
School of Social Science in New
York charged here yesterday.
Speaking to 40 students and
townspeople at an off-campus
meeting in conjunction with Negro
History week, the 37-year-old au-
thor of various books on the Negro
in America said that writers either
eliminated necessary mention of
the race or else distorted the truth
about Negroes.
HE CITED "The Anti-Slaverys
Origins of the Civil War," a book
by Prof. Dwight L. Dumond of the
history department, as an example
of deletion of facts about Negroes.
"While activities of obscure
white abolitionists were includ-
ed, there was no mention of a
single Negro man or woman ac-
tive in the movement," Prof.
Aptheker maintained.
Prof. Dummond declined to
comment on the criticism last
night. The book, a general treat-
ment of the anti-slavery move-
ment, was composed of the Com-
monwealth Lectures which he de-
livered at the University of Lon-
don.
"Basic Documents of Ameri-
can History," By Henry Steele
Commager, also came in for
Prof. ptheker's criticism. "In
its two volumes containing two
million words, there is not one
word written or spoken by a Ne-
gro," he said.
Commenting on Prof. Apthek-
er's conclusions, Prof. Preston W.
Slosson of the history department
said no one point of view on the
Negro question was being forced
"by anybody on anybody."
He called the charge of delib-
erate distortion of Negro history
by the press and historians "a fat
lie."
The Jefferson School of Social
Science has been cited on the At-
torney General's list of subversive
organizations as "an adjunct of
the Communist Party."
Berlin Goods
Face Hardship
In Marketing
(Continued from Page 1)
at first appear, because firms
alone must bear the cost of spe-
cial packing and often have long
waits for available space on a
plane.
Output shipped by truck is oc-
casionally confiscated along with
the vehicle itself for purely arbi-
trary reasons, and delays are te-
dious. Last winter, because of Rus-
sian border controls, there was a
coal shortage in West Berlin. On-
ly every second street lamp burned
and in my residence we had hot
water, if we were lucky, once a
week.
Tuesday: Russian Zone eco-
nomics.

Beirut President Scores Red Gains

* * * *

By JOYCE FICKIES
Communism is gaining popular-
ity by "leaps and bounds" in the
countries of the Near East, Prof.
Stephen B. L. Penrose, Jr., presi-
dent of the American University
of Beirut in Lebanon, said yes-
terday.
But he added that it is looked
upon purely from a political point
of view and not as an ideological
concept.
The professor is currently tour-
ing the United States to raise fi-
nancial support for his university.
* *~ *
HE SAID THAT the Near East-
ern student would never seriously
discuss Marxism because of the
repugnance of its doctrines to him,
but that he would listen to Rus-
sian proposals from a sense of po-
litical expediency.
Russia can promise the people
of the Arab nations almost any-
rry Wtlk thing without fear of contradic-
of the tion because the Soviets do not
of the have any responsibilities in the
esident Near East at the present, he ex-
plained.

The Arabs do not think that ac-
cepting Russian help would imply
any committments on their part,
he indicated.
* *
FORMATION OF a successful
middle eastern defense command
will depend on whether the Uni-
ted States can gain the confidence
of the countries, Prof. Penrose said.
They are afraid that Israel
will try to expand and are only
intent upon defending them-
selves, he explained, adding that
although Britain, France and
the United States have guaran-
teed that the borders of Israel
will remain the same, the Arabs
"aren't sure we mean it."
Prof. Penrose also related how
the college student plays a major
role in political activity in the
Near East.
"Every student in the Arab
world is a politician," and politi-
cal leaders try to get students on
their side as a sort of "spearhead"
to their activities and to lend in-
tellectual status to it.

SL To Open
Petitioning
For Movies
Petitioning opens tomorrow for
sponsorship of Student Legislature
Cinema Guild movies to be shown
the last half of this semester and
the first half of the fall term.
Any recognized campus organi-
zation interested in sponsoring one
of the weekly film showings can
pick up a petition at the SL Bldg.
Completed petitions must be re-
turned by March 5..
Applicants should sign up for
an interview with the SL Cinema
Guild Board when they take out
petitions. The Board chooses and
schedules the sponsoring organi-
zations.
Movies picked for showings this
term include "The Hamilton Wo-
man," "The Razor's Edge," "To-
bacco Road," and "The Lady Van-
ishes."
Sponsoring organizations get 70
per cent of the film profits. Twen-
ty per cent goes to the Legislature
and 10 per cent is taken out for
an insurance fund.

ISA Balloting Marks Start
Of New Representative Body

Novelty might well be the key-
word of the current elections for
the International Students' Asso-
ciation's House of Representatives.
The House itself, for instance, is
a completely new body. Innovated
with the ISA constitution, which
was rewritten last spring, the
House's delegates will assume of-
fice after the ballots are mailed to
the national headquarters Mon-
day, and will serve for the remain-
der of this semester.
ACCORDING TO Edouard Plan-
chon, '54, ISA executive secretary,
representation will for the first
Slosson To Speak
Prof. Preston W. Slosson of
the history department will talk
on "George Washington and
UNESCO" at the Bethany Baptist
Church, Pontiac, tomorrow.
Prof. Slosson, facility advisor of
the University's UNESCO chapter,
is helping to organize a Pontiac
council.

time include all of the 900 foreign
students on campus.
This scheme resulted in a
grossly incomplete body, how-
ever, as 65 per cent of the na-
tionalities have no organizations
of their own.
The remedy selected for this sit-
uation is the election of House
members by two methods, national
and regional. Those countries
which have 10 to 35 natives at the
University are to be allotted one re-
presentative, 36 to 75, two and 76
and above, three.
* * *
NATIONS WITH fewer than ten
students fall automatically into
one of four broad regions, Africa,
Asia, America (North and South)
and Europe. By the plan for re-
gional representation, each of
these groups will elect one delegate
to the House.
In addition, 'there are 5 seats
allotted for organizational repre-
sentation, and 3 for special mem-
bers, who are given seats as re-
wards for participation. Special
members have no voting privileges.

j
i

I

14'

-Daily-La
VISITING PRESIDENT - Prof. William D. Schorger
Department of Near Eastern Studies points out features
proposed North Campus to Prof. Stephen B. L. Penrose, pr
of the University of Beirut in Lebanon.

Uf

ORL

z

Styled for Spring in

GREY or

NAVY

. 9 0

CAMPUS BUCKS

:_
fi
{= ti
r
<:;kx:o.
"f h
}{

by Modern Age

$7 95
Casual fashion in active footwear.
These have the cushiony, red rub-
ber soles for extra comfort. The
smart white eyelets circle wide,
contrasting laces. Year-round fa-
vorites that stay at the head of

;

:s:.:.;
.

,., l v
'"^w

the class.
Af ;E~kk rt
f
..:aui+ .x.MF ^n'ro nw .....Y.....:.o..Nw. .a^'

PLI

.ON and WOOL
EATED SKIRTS

- - or*"

I

r-^'-

y

. Y

'1

I,

2-HOUR tz# Cleaftep
1213 South University

/a
Q9

V

SPECIAL ANNIVERSARY
(for a limited time only)
DRY CLEANED, SPOTTED and PRESSED
SUITS ... 1.00... two for $1.01

SALE

{

a

Originally Much Higher Priced!
SPRING PASTEL PLAIDS AND SOLID COLORS IN PER-

c

DRESSES. 1.00.. two for $1.01
plain
COATS...1.00... two for $1.01
or combination of any two
SKIRTS . . . 50c . . . two for 51c
plain
SWEATERS.. 50c ... two for 51c

c

I

MANENTLY PLEATED SKIRTS

WASHABLE

55%

. . .

ORLON AND

45% WOOL.

SALE

SALE

Wonder orlon and wool that washes like magic all through its long life
- doesn't sag or stretch, resists wrinkles, gives warmth without weight,
never loses its fine texture. Soft muted spring colors in plaids or solids

TROUSERS.. 50c ... two for 1c
or combination of any two

with both small knife and box pleats. Sizes 10 to 18.

Grey, pink, blue,

I - ; -r- 4.-rl e

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan