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May 27, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY 27, 1952

SPIRIT OF GARGOYLE:
Human Dynamo Shifts Gears
* , * *
By DONNA HENDLEMAN *s
Marjorie A. Nimz, '52, is one
woman who seems to personify thea
age-old theory of the conservation
of energy. a
N'o matter how much she does,
Miss Nimz, better known as Peg, "
seems to be able to come up for
more. Tiny, (5 feet, 95 pounds)
the new has-been editor of the
Gargoyle seems to make up for her:
lack of stature with a seemingly
boundless capacity for work.
Anticipating her departure from
the first floor hole in the Student
Publications Building, Miss Nimz
whirled her way through a giant
campaign this spring to come in
second in the three-seat race for
the Board in Control of Student
Publications.
THE MINUTE Chicagoan's Gar-
goyle career, oddly enough, all be-
gan as a "horrible mistake.'"
"I was a freshman, and decid-
ed to go to a Daily tryout meet-:
ing," she reminisced. "I wander-
ed into the Garg office instead;:
they were having a meeting, <.. ,
too.",

'U' Survey
Examinesj
'48 Election
A report just published by the
University Survey Research Cen-
ter found that voters who made
up their minds during the last
two weeks of the 1948 presidential
election decided the outcome.
The national survey, written by
Angus Campbell, Center director,
and Robert L. Kahn, assistant pro-
gram director, showed that this
group comprised twelve percent
of the total vote, with three-quar-
ters of it going to the Democrats.
Four other points uncovered by
the survey are:
1. Truman's margin over Dewey
was won in the big city and rural
areas.
2. Skilled and semi-skilled
workers, laborers and farmers
comprised the largest bulk of
Truman supporters.
3. The undecided voters in the
professional-managerial class and
the skilled, semi-skilled class made
the largest shift to Truman.
4. The greatest gain for Truman
after October according to income
groups was in the $4000-$5000 cat-
egory.
Opera Class
To Perform
Opera Workshop class, under
the direction of Prof. Wayne Dun-
lap of the music school, will pre-
sent a three-day program of opera
scenes and complete operas per-
formed by students in music
school, beginning at 4:15 p.m. to-
day in Rackham Assembly Hall.
Featuring the lighter operas, to-
day's performance will include the
complete opera, "The Telephone"
by Menotti; scenes from "Carou-
sel" by Rodgers and scenes from
"Street Scene" by Weill.
Tomorrow's program will con-
sist of standard opera while Thurs-
day's will feature Menotti operas.
The performances are open to the
public.
ESQIRE'
regularly$6-NOW$4
with this coupon
Use for gifts: graduation, Fath-
er's Day, or own use. Offer
expires June 30. Esky card sent.

Fraternities Pledge Seventy During Open Rushing

Svnyadtoame aebeen pledged by fraternities on
campus during the Inter-fraterni-
ty Council's open rushing program
this semester, the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs announced yesterday.
The following men are pledges
of:
ACACIA-Robert E. Dildine, '55-
E; David S. Dow, '55.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI-Thomas
F. Ehman, '55.
ALPHA TAU OMEGA-Larry
L. Eckstrom '55; Ronald F.
Gora, '55; Carl R. Kamhout, '55;
Jack A. Klassen, '53; James M.
McKevitt, '55; Joseph G. Shom-
sky, '55; James U. Wagner, '55;
Donald L. Ferguson, '54; Ronald
W. Bonatz, '54.
BETA THETA PI-Richard H.
Fisher, '55; Donald E. Schultz, '55;
Don E. Byron, '55; John Gelden,
'55; Floyd A. Graham, '55; Arthur
T. Iverson, '55; Richard O'Connor,
'54; Robert Van Volson Rice, '55.

CHT PHI-Ronald.E. Wright,
'54; George W. Stoner.
CHI PSI-John D. Powless, '55P.
DELTA KAPPA EPSILON -
John Williams, '55.
DELTA TAU DELTA-William
P. Barlow, '55; Richard O'Shaug-
nessy. '54.
DELTA UPSILON-Paul Mal-.
lory, '53.
PHI DELTA THETA-Charles
W. Kropf, '54; Richard Cota,
'55.
PHI GAMMA DELTA-Regin-
ald E. Shave, '54; Clarence N.
Tinker, '54.
PHI KAPPA PSI-Gilbert J.
Snyder, '55E; John Coolidge; Paul
R. Jones.
PHI KAPPA SIGMA-Joseph C.
Lowrey, '55.
PHI KAPPA TAU-Rodney H.

Watson, '55E; Kenneth A. Hafer,
'56; Ralph E. Wilson, '56.
PHI SIGMA DELTA-Martin W.
Gruenfeld, '55E.
SIGMA ALPHA MU-Stephen J.
Jelin, '55.
SIGMA CHI - Frederick G.
Newman, '54; Leo R. Schlicht,
'55; Irving Lee Cannon, '55; Ed-
ward L. Hickey, '55; John D.
Cline, '55.
SIGMA PHI-Martin J. Kelley,
Jr., '54; William G. Nelson, '55.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON-Maurice
S. VanAuken, '55.
TAU DELTA PHI-Gerald M.
Avrin, '57A&D; Clyde L. Hale, '56-
E; Evan Hirsh, '56E.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON-Daniel
P. Moroney, '54.
THETA DELTA CHI-Herbert
V. Jennings, '54, Harry A. Easom,
'54; Charles E. Butler, '55.
THETA XI-William H. Mor-

rissey, '54E; Alan H. Koski, '54
Roger B. DeVries; Stanley L.
Martin.
TRIANGLE-Walter E. Rupp,
II, '54E; David S. Neale, '55E; For-
est G. Wolfe, '55E; Harry L. An-
derson, '55E; Clifford M. Schutz,
'55E; Howard W. Beatty, '53E,
William H. Bernard, '55E.
TRIGON-Raymond Lewis, '55;
James L. Ryan, '57A&D; Arthur
Speckhard, '54.
ZETA PSI-James R. Buck, '53.
Rushing Leaders
To MeetTonight
Both fraternity Rushing Chair-
man and Inter-Fraternity Coun-
cil Rushing Counselors will meet
at 7:30 p.m. today in Rm. 3B of
the Michigan Union, the IFC an-
nounced yesterday.

l

1.1

"When I asled if it was the
Daily, the editor said yes-and I
stayed."
** S
AND SO BEGAN a career that
was a little more trying than most.
After the initial meeting, she de-
cided she had been somewhat bam-
boozled, and would just forget "the
whole thing."
But a few weeks later she
wrote a "masterpiece" for soph-
omore composition, and couldn't
resist offering it to the maga-
zine.
"Th, printed it," she remem-
bered. 'At4 they changed the ti-
tle. I was so 'i4a4I swore I wouldn't
write anything more for them."
The next issue contained pages
of Nimz-created gags, and she
was caught.'
When Garg got booted off cam-
pus two years ago, Miss Nimz had
a great deal to do with its hang-
ing on and its subsequent revival
as a recognized sheet. "As a joke
I suggested we keep publishing it
off-campus. When the editor
agreed I had to stick it out on
principle."
Miss Nimnz's description of how
she became managing editor
smacks a little of her Gargoylian
wit.
"I was the only one ready for
the job," she noted. "We had been
publishing off campus in such a
small room, not many people could
fit in there. So. by the time we

The PLACE to GO, for the NAMES you KNOW!!

EAnkl

(:)

FO

ICED TO.
OUTI

-Daly-Malcolm Shatz
CASTAWAY-Marjorie (Peg) Nimz, '53, has to take what they
will give her at the Gargoyle office these days since she fell off
her managing editor's perch. Having finally gotten hold of the
galleys 'for the last Gargoyle, she busily reads for errors.

*c * *

* *#

had returned to full status, my
predecessor and I had all the ex-
perience."
ALTHOUGH MISS Nimz would
,often "live" the Garg during pub-
lication times-eat, no sleep and
talk Gargoylian-those who have
a conception of a humor magazine
editor as a "funny character"
should take another look at this
one.
Behind the humorous antics lie
one of the best business heads in
the Publications Building and un-
der her reign Gargoyle splashed
solidly into the black.
A political science major, Miss
Nimz doesn't expect to make a

career out of humor either. She
is speculating now on a future
with the government-overseas
work preferred.
In recognition of her hard work,
Miss Nimz last year was tapped by
Wyvern, the junior women's hon-
orary, and this, year Mortarboard
snatched her during their annual
midnight tirade.
Although her campus career has
been varied and successful, Miss
Nimz still has one thwarted ambi-
tion. Now a first semester senior,
she is yet to turn twenty, much
less twenty-one.
"I'm going to stick it out until
I'm legal," she promises. June 4,
1953-everyone's invited."

OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF FRESH, NEW, SMART
SPRING AND SUMMER MERCHANDISE!!!
EVERYTHING MUST BE GONE WHEN YOU GO HOME FOR THE SUMMER.

L

Student Periodical
Box 2006
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Agency U
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