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May 23, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRMAY, MAY 23, 1951

SIX FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1952
I I

AIL, SUSPENSION?
OMS, lahoma Rocked
By Wild Demonstrations

Travel Service Ready To Roll

Campus
Calendar

NEW STYLES FIRST

AT WILD'S

V.

Two more schools have jumped
on the riot bandwagon now
speeding with increasing velocity
throughout the country.
A threat of suspension from the
school and possible change of
their draft-exempt status is now
hanging over leaders of the "pan-
tie raid" staged at Michigan State
_College Wednesday.
Andyesterday's 2,000-man dem-
onstration at the University of
Oklahoma brought threats by po-
lice officials of two to 20 years
imprisonment for leaders of a fu-
ture riot.
AT EAST LANSING the 1,000
students milled around for more
than three hours but did not suc-
ceed in entering any of the wom-
SL Anti-Bias
PlI'an Vetoed
ByHatcher
(Continued from Page 1)
tion again. No action came out of
the Legislature until fall, how-
ever, when, following an unsuc-
cesful attempt to reach agreement
wi1 IFC, SL approved a motion
specifying a time-limit of 1956 for
removal of the clauses and requir-
ing groups to petition their na-
tional conventions immediately.
Failure to comply would again
mean loss of official recognition.
In a tense session last spring,
the SAC okayed this action by
a vote of seven to six, and pass-
ed it on to Presdient Ruthven
for final approval.
Two days before classes ended
in June, the news came that Presi-
dent Ruthven had vetoed the mea-
sure. He stated that property
rights of organizations faced with
loss of recognition would be "jeo-
pardized, if not destroyed," and
added that "no individual has an
inherent right to membership in
any organization."
A Daily editorial at the time
claimed that the president "had let
Irrevelant side issues obstruct an
effort to eliminate contradictions
between the ideals professed at
this university and the practices
sanctioned."
* * *
AFTER THE veto setback, it
took until late this fall for any.
thing new to happen. Apparently
feeling Its way, the Student Legis-
lature voted to give its "utmost
cooperation" to the IFC nwork-
ing on the problem. They warned,
however, that they would step In
again if nothing was done.
In Iecember, the IFC passed
a resolution leaving the whole
matter of bias clauses up to the
individual houses to settle, fav-
oring an absence of any "coer-
cive threat," and offering a
counseling and information ser-
vice to Interested groups.
So far as the SL was concerned,
this was "nothing done," and they
proceeded immediately to work
drawing up a new anti-bias pro-
posal. On Feb. 13, it came to a
head in a fight over whether or
not to have a time limit set to
clear out the clauses. It was fin-
ally decided, over strong opposition
from some legislators, to wipe out
the time limit section and recom-
mend simply that fraternities be
made to petition and actively
urge removal of restrictive clauses
before their national conventions.
' This was approved by the SAC
in March, seven to six, and hand-
ed to freshman President Harlan
H. Hatcher for ratification. It was
this proposal which he vetoed on
Wednesday.

en's dormitories or sororities to
carry off coed underclothing.
Whereas women were active
participants in most of the 20-
odd student riots staged this
month, MSC coeds gave no en-
couragement to the undie-seek-
ing barrage, remaining in their
tightly locked, dormitories dur-
ing all the excitement.
East Lansing and campus police
made wholesale arrests of the
ringleaders. Arthur F. Brandstat-
ter, chief of college police said a
total of 47 students were booked.
All were released after being ques-
tioned when the turmoil died
down shortly after midnight.
Some students, claimed they
started the raid because they con-
sidered an open letter from Dean
of Students Tom King, posted in
all dormitories late Wednesday, a
"challenge."
* * *
THE LETTER warned that the
students participating in raids
similar to other campuses might
face loss of their draft defer-
ments.
At Norman, Oklahoma, Pub-
lic Commission Dixie Gilmer
laid the law down: "If anyone
thinks riot is going to run ram-
pant in Oklahoma they have
another think coming."
Gilmer was just one of many
peace officers irked at the sortie
which ended in a wild egg-throw-
ing disturbance. Police from
Shawnee, Seminole and Pauls
Valley assisted by 15 cars of State
Troopers were hard put to quell
the riot. A dozen students were
arrested.
Gilmer said if his troops were
called out again he would put
charges of inciting a riot against
the* disturbance leaders. The
charge carries a possible sentence
of two to 20 years in prison.
Smaller demonstrations staged
this week at Illinois, 'California,
Georgia, Richmond, Duluth, Brad-
ley, Cornell, Texas, Mississippi,
Kentucky, and St. Louis Univer-
sities have brought the number
of college riots to an approxi-
mate 25.

I1
Events Today
MEDICINE - Dr. MacDonald
Critchley, Dean of the Institute of
Neurology of National Hospital,
Queen's Square, London, will speak
on "Disorders of the Body Image
in Relation to the Parietal Lobe,,
at 4:15 p.m. in Rackham Amphi-
theatre under the auspices of the
Medical School Department of
Neurology.
MOVIES-Three movies on des-
ert life, "What Makes a Desert,"
"Life in Hot Dry ,and," and "Des-
ert Demons," will be presented by
the University Museums at 7:30
p.m. in Kellogg Auditorium.
INDUSTRY--Two hundred exe-
cutives from the auto transport
industry will wind up a two-day
conference on industry's problems
at the Union. Sponsored by the
new University Transportation In-
stitute, the meeting is directed by
Prof. John C. Kohl of the engi-
neering college.
* * *
FAR EAST-Prof. Ryusaku Tsu-
noda of the department of Chinese
and Japanese, Columbia Univer-
sity, will speak on "The ,influence
of Buddhism on Japanes6 Culture"
at 4:15 p.m. in Kellogg Auditor-
ium.
* * *
CINEMA GUILD-SL Cinema
Guild with Wyvern and Mortar
Board will present "Movie Crazy"
starring Harold Lloyd at 7:30 and
9:30 p.m. today and tomorrow at
Hill Auditorium. Admission will
be fifty cents.

A

* * *
UNION TRAVEL Service has be-
gun its transportation pro-
gram for students leaving school
for summer vacation.
The service provides a ride shar-
ing program for drivers who want
riders in traveling to various parts
of the countiy.
All those who desire rides or
riders upon leaving school can sign
up at booths placed in the lobby
of the League, the old entrance of
N.Y. Musicologist
Talks at Rackhar
Gustave Reese, outstanding mu-
sicologist from New York Univer-
sity spoke last night at Rackham
Auditorium on the "Imaginative
Uses of Canon and Imitation at
the Time of Josquin."

* * *
East Quad, the Law Quad or at the
main booth in the Union Lobby
Drivers should fill out blue cards
and riders red ones, Each day the
cards are collected and filed in
chronological order, thereby put-
ting the service on a first come-
first served basis.
There will be a map placed in
the Union Lobby showing the ex-

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
* * *
cess of riders or drivers to a given
place. Those interested in finding
their chances of getting rides or
riders to desired cities can check
the map daily. r
The service will operate until
Thursday, May 29, Dick Roth, '53,
Union staffman announced. Roth
also stated that drivers are most in
demand.

I

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Have several pair for your wardrobe,
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Sizes: Small, Medium, Large.

LOUNGE AND SPORTS
APPAREL
COOL AND ATTRACTIVE APPAREL OF EXCLU-
SIVE DESIGN TO SERVE COMFORTABLY FOR
BUSINESS, VACATION, TRAVEL AND SPORTS
WEAR. CAREFULLY DEVELOPED IN ALL DE-
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TROPICAL WORSTED SUITS
55% Dacron, 45% Wool......... ....55
ALL WOOL GABERDINE
SUITS BY VARSITY-TOWN... . .............. $65
PURE IRISH LINEN SUITS.. .,.... . ....... $49.50
SPORTS JACKETS..... ...........$35 to $45
NYLCORD SUITS.....................$32.50
COTTON CORD SUITS....................$25
FADED BLUE DENIM JACKETS.............$15
PALM BEACH SUMMER WEAR

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PALM BEACH
FABRIC

SUN FROST
TROPICAL

995 $4350
RESORT WEAVE
COAT
$35

T SPRINGWEAVE
L TROPICAL
$4950
SPORTS
TROUSERS
$10

.

5..

Sport Shirts * Beach Wear and Robes
Hats * Haberdashery " Shoes
OWIIL S
State. Street on the Campus

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-11

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GRADUATES

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in
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JUNE OR AUGUST GRADUATES-ANY MAJOR
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Please write giving degree expected, age, height, and other pertinent information to: Box

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