100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 13, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GE SEX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 1952

;AYS ROVING CENTER:
Pollock Has Varied Career

* * *

* * *

By BOB JAFFE
sen. Clay called him his "rov-
g center."
The general was referring to
of. James K. Pollock, versatile
airman of the political science
partment, who spendls his time
a welter of administrative,
aching and public service tasks
at would keep the ordinary man
ing a twenty-eight hour day.
PROF. POLLOCK, a specialist
problems of German govern-
ant, is well 'qualified for this
)rk since he was a key man in
tting up the governmental
ructure in the American zone of
cupation in Germany. He was
so chief architect of the Land-
rat, the Council of States.
While Prof. Pollock was work-
ng under Gen. Clay in Ger-
nany, a deep bond of friendship
,rose between the two men. "He
lever let American military gov-
rnment forget American ideals"
he general said in appreciation.
Prof. Pollock tells of the time
and Gen. Clay were discussing,
ans for the first post-war elec-
ons in Germany. It was then
ctober and the general thought
at the elections should be held
January. Prof. Pollock was hesi-
,nt as he didn't feel there would
ENSIAN Distribution
Fri. Sat., May 16-17
at Student Publ. Bldg.

Dr. Bodian
To Present
PolioTalk
Dr. David Bodian, of the Polio-
myelitis Laboratory of Johns Hop-
kins University, will give the third
annual Don W. Gudakunst Mem-
orial Lecture at 4 p.m. today in
the auditorium of the public
health school.
The title of his talk will be
"The Pathogenesis of Poliomye-
litis." He will discuss the most
modern theory of how children
get polio, the research work being
done on it and the attempts being
made to find preventatives for
polio.
Dr. Bodian recently made one
of the two reports submitted on
the discovery that polio strikes
first in the blood instead of the
nerves.
The Gudakunst lecture is given
each year in memory of Dr. Don
Gudakunst, former medical direc-
tor of the National Foundation
for Infantile Paralysis and a
graduate of the University.

I'

By EUGENE HARTWIG
Eating habits got a jolt through-
out America last week as a short-!
age of potatoes knock the seem-
ingly ever present staple from the
dinner menu.
The potato famine came to light
here when Leonard Schaadt, di-
rector of Residence Halls, an-
nounced the University was forced
to abandon potatoes as a dorm
food.
The University had the alter-
native of dealing through the
"black market" or doing without,
Schaadt explained. Indignant, he
declared, "The University has
resolutely refused to obtain pota-
toes through 'black or grey mar-
ket' channels."
: HENRY HELLE of the Food
Service reported that produce
men from his department have
scoured the entire state and found
no traces of the sought after item.
The only potatoes available were
a limited supply of pre-peeled and
treated ones from produce brokers
in Detroit. These could be had
only at considerable cost.
Restaurants across the nation
have hung out 'no potato' signs
as they sought desperately to
find starch-rich substitutes.
Reports from Washington, D.C.
indicated that dwellers in the
capital have been eating potatoes
imported from Spain since Easter.
Washingtonians have been quick
to dub the imported tubers 'Span-
ish Spuds.'
* * *
THE SLIGHT TRICKLE of
starchy stuff that has been com-

"#.
6
....
,i

I

EATING HABITS JOLTED:
Shortage Knocks Spuds From Menu
*, * *

- i
-Daily-Stu Ross
. . . 'Hot' Spuds
ing to the 'U' through the efforts
of the Food Service has been
labeled for the University Hospi-
tal by an administration under-
standing.
According to Helle poor
weather conditions were chiefly
responsible for a poor crop this
year. Potatomen in the starch
belt of northern Michigan pre-
dicted the shortage when their
storage bins were emptied late
last fall. Under normal condi-
tions the growers could have
continued to supply the market
until the new crop was harvest-
ed this year.
Prof. Ulrey of the department of
Agricultural Economics at Michi-

gan State pointed out in a tele-
phone interview that an unusually
low price last fall caused the mar-
ket to absorb the supply too quick-
ly.
HE ALSO mentioned that the
government's buying large lots of
potatoes for use in the armed
forces may have played a small
part in the shortage. The army
has traditionally been a heavy
consumer of a meat and potato
diet.
Ulrey expected that the short-
age would take care of itself as
soon as the new crop comes on
the market sometime this sum-
mer.
Meanwhile as the threatened
shortage developed into a definite
trend and potato prices went up
during the winter, the govern-
ment clamped a ceiling on the
consumer market.
IN PLACING a ceiling on con-
sumer spuds, OPS allowed seed
potatoes to remain restriction-
free. Profit eager brokers were
getting table potatoes labeled as
seed and selling them without a
ceiling price.
'U' Residence Halls had been
buying these 'seed' spuds
marked as such by a blue tag
at above OPS prices, Sclhaadt
said.
OPS then cracked down and
blocked any further broker profi-
teering by jamming a ceiling on
seed potatoes too. As a, result
produce brokers refused to sell ex-
cept through 'black market' chan-
nels.

College. Plant
Group Holds
Conferene
The University Plant Service is
currently entertaining 130 mem-
bers and guests of the Association
of Physical Plant Administrators
of Universities and Colleges.
Visitors from all parts of the
nation are attending the Associa-
tion's annual conference, which
will continue meeting today and
tomorrow.
This morning the group will
hear three speeches on problems
relating to handling radioactive
materials. "Atomic Research--
The Phoenix Project," by Dean
Ralph A. Sawyer of the Graduate
School, "Problems of Radiation
Control" by Prof. W. Wayne Mein-
ke of the chemistry department,
and "Demonstration on Measure-
ment and Handling of Radioactive
Material by Associate Radiological
Safety Officer Ardath H. Em-
mons-.
This afternoon's program in-
cludes lectures on "Making Rou-
tine Maintenance Routine," "Pho-
tography as a Tool" and "Con-
trolling the Maintenance Dollar."
The visitors will have dinner at
the University Fresh Air Camp
at Patterson Lake.
For6rdua6n
k I
l rw+
A 9 1

-

I I

I

HIGH COMMAND-Prof. James K. Pollock (right) confers with
Gen. Lucius Clay at the Headquarters of the Regional Govern-
ment Co-ordinating Office in Germany of which Prof. Pollock

Campus
Calendar

I.
i

was the head.
be enough time to set up an effi-
cient election system by then.
The General told him "You
don't learn to swim until you jump
in the wate'r," to which Prof. Pol-
lock quickly retorted, "But the
water in January is very cold."
Not to be outdone the general set-
tled the dispute with "Yes, but it's
also very invigorating."
Prof. Pollock, generally ac-
knowledged as the best golfer in
his department, lectuers to all

survey courses in political science.
In addition he teaches classes in
German government and national
administration. The first course
ever offered by the University on
national administration was given
by him in 1926.
In his book, "Decision in Ger-
many," Gen. Lucius Clay inscribed
in the copy he sent to Prof. Pol-
lock. "I hope you enjoy this record
since you had such an important
part in making it."

STUDENT
SUPPLIES

Typewriters
Repaired
Rented
Sold
Bought

SAVE AT SAM'S STORE-----

I

Webster-Chicago Tape
and Wire Recorders
Fountain Pens Repaired
by a Factory Trained Man
MORRILL'S
314 S. State Ph. 7177
i11ector shavers!
Does your skin smart, burn,
when you apply lotion after
shaving? Try it on your
forehead. Same skin yet no
burn! That's because your
facial skin is irritated from
shaving- probably because
..You're using a razor blade
round like a penknife and
you have to "bear down"
to shave clean.
PAL's patented Hollow
Ground process makes "bearing
down" unnecessary. You shave
with a light, light stroke; your
face is coo, relaxed--your
skin isn't irritated, is left smooth
as a teen-ager's! You owe it
to your face to try
PAL___
z'. .PL GROND
INJECTOR BLADES
BLTN VAULT
.20 for 59c
10 for39c - 6for25c
in Metal Injectors with
vaults for used blades.
fit yourinjecbt Razor
PAL ~ parfadt.
-e

ARMY TYPE
FO.OT LOCKtERS
A handy item for travel
camp or storage
OTHER FOOT LOCKERS
6.65 and up
Plus Excise and Sales Tax

Events Today
QUARTET-The String Quartet
Class, under the direction of Rob-
ert Courte, violinist of the Uni-
versity's Stanley Quartet, will give
a public program at 8:30 .p.m. in
the Rackham Assembly Hall.
THAILAND - The Thai Stu-
dents Association and the Student
Religious Association will hold a
program on Thailand, including
a panel discussion and slides, at
7:30 p.m. at the home of Prof.
Donald Katz, 2011 Washtenaw
Ave.
Free transportation to the
meeting will be-provided at 7:15
in front of Lane Hall.
Events Tomorrow
RAINMAKER -- Vincent J.
Schaefer of the General Electric
Research Laboratory at Schenec-
tady, N.Y., will speak on the
scientific aspects of rain making
at 8 p.m. in the Rackham Lecture
Hall under the auspices of Sigma
Xi.
* * *
CONCERT - The University
Arts Chorale and the University
Women's Choir, conducted by
Maynard Klein, will present a
concert at 8:30 p.m. in Hill
Auditorium.
COFFEE HOUR-The last of

, ---- "s
-
r
,
r t
v
- -- .e
.r -'-
Jr .

,;

Coventry Palmore penned:
LIFE IS NOT
LIFE AT ALL
WITHOUT DELIGHT
(ictory in Defeat
Punctuate your life with pleasures. A
short pause for a Coke means a full stop
to tiring work and a fresh start refreshed.

..

1

4

5ยข

""*
'as low as,
$1.25 per week,

t
;.

msQ~'s

11

this year's student-faculty coffee
hours will be held from 4 to 6 p.m.
on the Union Terrace.
Coming Events
RECITAL-Charles Stephenson.
tenor, will give a public recital at
8:30 p.m. Thursday at the Rack-
ham Assembly Hall.
ART EXHIBITION -The first
annual Michigan Regional Art
Exhibition will open at the Rack-
ham Gallery Thursday.

BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
ANN ARBOR COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
"Coke" is a registered trade-mark. @ 1952, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

115 West Liberty
Phone 8950
ROYAL PORTABLE
DEALERS SINCE 1926

iITSr=l=lJ.=M;,h 1.:' ":" ;.

SAM'S STOREI
122 East Washington St.
SAVE AT SAM'S STORE i

s

1
l-
y

i
1

GARGOYLE is
coming out tomorrow.
It is! It is,

All these Big-Car Extras
with the Lowest-Priced Line in its Field I

I(

-'-- pi" _ U '
- G
- '7-

1 i . f
jIrY

EXTRA SMOOTH PERFORMANCE
of Centerpoise Power

EXTRA RIDING COMFORT
of Improved Knee-Action

EXTRA STRENGTH AND COMFORT
of Fisher Unisteel Construction

EXTRA WIDE CHOICE
of Styling and Colors

EXTRA BEAUTY AND QUALITY
of Body by Fisher

~AJJ 7~X~

f
c /._

EXTRA SMOOTHNESS
of POWER LT G
Automatic Transmission
A complete power team with
extra- ..vviupd Valve-in-

lil

11111

H IIII!

1

j

1

I

E

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan