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May 11, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY 11, 1952

Will

Oen

Doors,

Campus
Calendar

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4

* *

By JOYCE FICKIESI
The University Hospital will
open its doors to visitors from 1:30
p.m. to 4:30 p.m. today in observ-
ance of national "Hospital Day."
Guided tours and special dis-
plays will be the order of the day
as students, faculty and towns-
people get a chance to view the in-
ner workings of the huge institu-
tion. The day is designed to show
the "human side" of hospital ad-
ministration.
*, * *
MORE THAN two weeks of prep-
aration have gone into the many
displays which visitors will see at
the open house. They will include
such things as technical apparatus
used in the hospital and manne-
quins in uniform depicting staff
members of the institution.
Upon entering the building,
guests will .be greeted by Dr. Al-
bert C. Kerlikowske, Director of
the Hospital, and his immediate
associates. After this, a choice
of three guided tours will be
available to the visitors. Each
tour, made up of ten persons,
will last approximately an hour.
Student nurses, medical students
and hospital personnel will serve
as guides.
Experienced technicians will be
on hand at each stop to explain
the equipment and answer any
questions. Departments scheduled
for the tour include: maternity
hospital, operating rooms, x-ray
therapy, pharmacy manufactur-
ing, nursing units, polio center,
hospital school, occupational ther-
apy, physical medicine, diet ther-
apy, radioactive isotope laboratory'
and the storerooms.
** *
THE PURPOSE of Hospital Day
is to commemorate the birthday
of Florence Nightingale, famed
"angel of mercy" of the Crimean
War. By means of this interna-
tional open house day,'hospitals in
ten countries and territories of the
United States have paid tribute to
the English nurse who conitibuted
so much to the improvement of
hospital conditions.
Begun in 1921 by leaders in the
field of health, the day is sponsor-
ed by the National Hospital Asso-
ciation, an organization which in-
cludes more than six thousand
hospitals-almost all those in the
nation.
The ceremony has met with
great public approval. The first
"Hospital Day" was endorsed by
such dignitaries as President
Harding, Gen. John J. Pershing,
and numerous governors, mayors
and other public officials.
Three Professors
Honored at Dinner
A testimonial banquet was held
last night at the Michigan Union'
honoring retiring Professors Sam-
uel Dana and Leigh Young, and
retired Prof. William Kynoch, of
the School of Natural Resources.

I

EVENTS TODAY
SINFONIA-Phi Mu Alpha, pro-
fessional music fraternity, will
present its annual sinfonia featur-
ing contemporary music at 3 p.m.
in the Henderson Rm. of the Lea-
gue.
The program will include: oper-
atic arias sung by David Murray,
'53SM, baritone, a piano sonata by
Alban Berg, played by Ormond
Sanderson, Grad.; a Bartok violin
sonata played by Ted Johnson,
Grad.; and contemporary songs
sung by Bob Kerns, '54SM, bari-
tone.
* *
ASP PICNIC-The Council of
Arts,-Sciences and Professions will
hold a picnic -at 7:30 p.m. at the
stone fireplace on the Island.
COMING EVENTS
ATOM DAY-Tuesday is "atom
day" at the University and nearly
400 business executives will take
part in the program which is de-
signed to show what the Univer-
"sity is doing and plans to do in
the field of atomic research.
Sponsored by the Michigan-Me-
morial Phoenix Project, the day's
activities will include a tour of
University atomic study facilities
and addresses by promnent offi-
cials and scientists.
** *
QUARTET CLASS-The String
Quartet Class, under the direction
of Robert Courte, violist of the
Stanley- Quartet, will present a
program at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Rackham Assembly Hall.
Members of the class who will
perform are: Gail Hewitt, '54SM;
Marilyn Palm, '52SM; Louise Leo-
nard, '52SM; and Velma Streicher,
'52SM.
CHORAL CONCERT-The Uni-
versity Arts Chorale and the Wo-
men's Choir will give a public
concert at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday
in Hill Auditorium.

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-Daily-Don Campbell
STAFF PHARMACISTS WORK IN LABORATORY
COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Four Colleges Rocked
By Lively SpringRiots

By JAN WINN
Spring has descended upon cam-I
puses throughout the country,I
bringing with it a slew of riots
reminiscent of the University's re-
cent display of "spring madness."
Six students were suspended
from the University of Illinois this
week for "disorderly conduct" dur-
ing the 2,000-man riot which
rocked the campus for five hours.
NO EXACT cause was determ-
ined for the demonstration which
consisted of a series of raids on
fraternities, sororities and dormi-
tories accompanied by violent in-
terplay between students and pd-
lice.
The melee finally broke up af-
ter police made vigorous appeals
to the mob. "While we are over
here the whole county is unpro-
tected" a security official was
heard shouting.
A dim view of the demonstra-
tion was taken by University. of-
ficials and press, the Daily Illini
saying, "The instigators of Tues-
day's demonstrations and those
who sought to perpetuate mob rule
last night are undesirable elements
of the student community, men
who have no business here."
IN THE EAST an MIT dean and
f7 students were charged with dis-

turbing the peace during a riot
and march on Radcliffe.

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Dean Frederick G. Gasset, Jr.
was accused by Cambridge pa-
trolmen of dropping water
bombs on a police car and in-
citing 200 students to raid Rad-
cliffe in quest of "dainty souve-
nirs."
Both dean and students pleaded
not guilty.
Drinking rules were the moti-
vation behind Dartmouth's addi-
tion to the rioting scene.
Two thousand students, egged
on by fire-crackers, cymbals and
cardboard torches marched twice
on the home of the dean to protest
the new college drinking regula-
tions. The dean meeting the mob
on his front porch answered cries
of, "We want beer!" with, "If you
want a drink there isn't anything
to stop you."
"However," he added, "thereI
could be a lot of consequences."
The Purdue Exponent labeled a
Purdue University demonstration
as, "childish, immature and not
particularly original." The cause
of the raid on the women's resi-
dences was undetermined but ac-
cording to PU officials, "The write-
up in Life magazine of a similar
raid by the students of the Uni-
versity of Michigan was a possible
inspiration."

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