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February 14, 1952 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-02-14

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1952

PAGE SiX THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1952
___________________________________________________ U

HST Notes
West Europe
Arms Rise
WASHINGTON -(A)- Western
Europe's arsenals, in which the
United States has invested mil-
lions of dollars for mutual defense,
are about to quadruple the value
of their contributions, President
Truman told Congress today.
For reasons of military security
the President did not give precise
figures in making his fourth semi-
annual report on the Mutual
Defense Assistance Program
(MDAP).
BUT HE STATED that "It may
be said that the estimated total
value of Western European pro-
duction of military hard-goods
during 1952 will be approximately
four times the 1949 value." MDAP
has been in existence two years.
The President also said Amer-
ican military and economic aid
has revived Western European
morale to a point where any
Communist aggression will meet
with "determined resistance."
Modern military weapons and
supplies are moving overseas in an
increasing stream, the President
reported. For the period of the re-
port--April 1 to Oct. 9, 1951-
these shipments totalled 1,439
million dollars.
AMONG THE military items
which Mr. Truman said are now
being produced in "significant
quantity" by Allied countries in
Europe are military vehicles, ma-
chine guns, mines, rockets and
other ammunition. He also men-
tioned such heavy items as planes,
tanks and warships.
The report did not furnish any
figures on quantities.
Without giving the number of
effective combat divisions now un-
der the command of Gen. Dwight
D. Eisenhower, it stated "It is not
yet adequate, to be sure, but West-
ern Europe is no longer the mili-
tary vacuum it was in 1949."

Huge Canine Poses Problem

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
The Phi Delta Thetas are afraid
they may be eaten out of their
house.
The cause of their concern is
one Lord Trevlac von Birkenhof,
a newly acquired great dane who
has the distinction of being the
third largest dog on the current
Kennel Club files.
* * *
FROM A LONG line of pedigree
great danes (both his parents are
winning show dogs) Trevlac
moved here "under pressure" from
the Bowling Green campus, where
he had spent a gluttonous three
years. The college authorities
there requested his removal be-
cause he had an expensive fascin-
ation for the local food service.
An ordinary daily diet for
Trevlac consists of four cans of
dog food, two quarts .of milk,
a bag of dog biscuits, two or
more eggs and any large scraps
and bones the men in the house
can pick up "cheap."
According to his feeder and
chief custodian, Henry Heil, '53,
this is about average for a dog his
size. The established ration for a
canine diet is one ounce of food for
every pound of weight.
: * *
SO FAR, TREVLAV has both-
ered no one herenbut a few of the
"brothers." "He not only eats our
food; he takes to our beds, too,"
they groan.
But despite the gripes, most
of the men in the house have
grown to like the monstrous
animal since his arrival here
just before finals.
He's too big to fight with any-
way," they observe practically.
Trevlac stands over three feet
when on all fours and weighs in
at almost 200 pounds. Unlike most
members of his species, when he
drinks he takes his water right out
of the kitchen sink.
* * *
DESPITE HIS SIZE the men
admit that the dog is really a
gentle animal. Used to living with
a crowd of people, he is extremely
good natured and an ineffective

IFC Gives
Advisor Aid
To Rushees
University men planning to rush
fraternities will, for the second
semester in a row, have available
a rushing counseling system run
by the Interfraternity Council.
Rushing counselors, one from
every fraternity on campus, help
students iron out problems con-
cerning fraternities. Most of these
troubles arise from scholastic dif-
ficulties and a misconception of
the fraternity system.
* * *
THE COUNSELING system was
considerably strengthened last
semester when the IFC House
Presidents Council passed a ruling
that every fraternity on campus
must provide a counselor who can-
not participate in the house's in-
dividual rushing activities and
cannot wear his fraternity pin.
This action, according to
Pete Thorpe, '53, Chairman of
the Rushing Committee, is de-
signed to give complete impar-
tiality and full participation to
the system.
So far, rushing counselors have
had difficulty in contacting
rushees. Contacts are ordinarily
made through slips filled out dur-
ing orientation week and students
registering for rushing.
Rushing registration will con-
tinue through Wednesday at the
IFC booths in the Union and on
the first floor of the Administra-
tion Bldg. Students can rush but
cannot pledge a fraternity unless
they register. Counseling service
will be available to rushees from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the two
weeks of rushing beginning Sun-
day in the IFC office in the Union.
A special rushing smoker will
be held for prospective rushees at
7:30 p.m. today in the Union Ball-
room. Movies and slides will be
shown and refreshments served.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

Budapest Quartet To Appear
In Concerts Starting Friday

The Budapest String Quartet
will be heard in the Twelfth An-
nual Chamber Music Festival at
8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday
and 2:30 p.m. Sunday in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
In addition to classical selec-
tions by Haydn, Beethoven, Moz-
art and Brahms for which the
group is famous, one modern
work will be included ineach
program. The group unanimously
believes that the newer music
must be played, not once, but
often.
* * *
ALTHOUGH the group origi-
nally started out with full fledged
Hungarian membership in the
18th century, in 1927 they broke
tradition and hired a Russian to
play the second violin. By 1936
there was not a single Hungarian
in the group.

Joeph Roisman, first violinist
comes from Odessa as does the
violist Boris Kroyt. Violincellist
Mischa Schneider is from Vilna
and second violinist Jac Goro-
detsky, most recent addition to
the Quartet, is also a native of
Odessa. All Russians by birth,
the four musicians are now
American citizens.
The musical four first appeared
in America in 1930 and have been
great favorites with music lovers
ever since. Equally popular in
other countries, they have jour-
neyed as far afield as the East
Indies, North Africa, Australia
and New Zealand and in 1950
toured Europe.
Tickets for the three perfor-
mances are now on sale at the
University Musical Society in
Burton Memorial Tower

Union Travel
Service Seeks
Weekend Rides
After passing its initial test dur-
ing semester vacation, the revised
Union Travel Service Ride Board
is ready to help students find
weekend rides and riders, staff-
man Harry Blum, '54, announced
yesterday.
Cards can be filled out by riders
who want weekend passengers and
students who need rides to their
destinations, Blum said. The cards
are then placed on the travel
board in the Union lobby, where
riders and drivers can co-ordinate
their plans.
The board will be cleared off
every Monday by Union staffmen
Blum suggested that students
commuting every day to nearby
towns also use the travel board.

-Daily-Al Reid
GREAT DELT-Trevlac von Birkenhof, a descendant of a long
line of prize winning Great Danes, poses with Henry Heil '53, of
Phi Delta Theta fraternity. Trevlac, the group's new mascot,
stands more than three-feet high and weights 200 pounds and
was expelled from Bowling Green University because of too large
an appetite.
* * * . ___________

Gustalory note:
Appetite comes
with eating.. s e
but thirst departs
with c rinin
Rab
You can lose thirsti
hurry with a bottle of ice-
Coca-Cola ... and
sparkling refreshm
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
ANN ARBOR COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
Q 1952, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

s
belais
ma
col)
find
aent.

t

watch dog. "But when he barks,
it's so loud he sounds like a lion
roaring."
Since Trevlac arrived at a time
when most social events were at a
standstill, the Phi Delts are plan-
ning a welcoming party for him
in the near future. "We're going
to hold on "Open Yard" on our
front lawn," Heil said. "Invita-
tions are being extended .to most
of the canine populace (of im-
portance). "But we're not asking
Major. He used to be the biggest
dog on campus; we wouldn't want
him to get a complex."
Trevlac hod no comment.

Michigan 'grad'
Seeks County Post
William F. Ager, Jr., Ann Arbor
attorney and a 1949 graduate of
the University Law School, yes-
terday announced his candidacy
for the Republican nomination for
county prosecutor.
Ager, the first candidate to step
forward for the post held by retir-
ing incumbent Douglas K. Read-
ing, is expected to meet strong
opposition for the job.

r0
1

J

I

l

i

INTER

- FRATERNITY

COUNCIL

V

UNIVERSITY

OF MICHIGfiN

wishes

I

to

announce

it

y_

14
a4

Beginning

February

1

71

1952,

with

OPEN

HOUSE

fiT

ALL

FRATERNITIES

* WHO: Whether you are a freshman or a
fraternities.

senior you

are eligible to rush campus

* WHERE: Rushees may sign up in the lobby of the Michigan Union at the
the main desk and at the Administration- Building.

cage

near

* WHEN:

Rushees may sign

up until

next Wednesday,

Feb. 20 from 9-5.

There

is

a

counsel ing

service

for those undecided in Room 3D of the Union from 9-5:30.

* WHY: The fraternity men on the Michigan campus invite you to become acquainted

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