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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 10, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I,

FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATDAY, MAY 10, 195

0

........_.. .
a

GEES AWA Y FROM IT ALL:
Hedonist TellsSs Leading to Garg
S esMost men come to the Univer-
sity to ge an education or a girl.
Don Malcolm claims he came to..'..
.he University to get away from
he police in his hometown, Flush- yr. :{<}":;r::y:>
ing, Michigan, where he is wanted %1y t
n a charge of hedonism. fY" ,: -:
FF.* p<:4{{.?i ..r.14t* L* 0k: t ..3f+"}:::4S:f:rv:i .".~./

THE FIRST thing the illustrious'
neophyte did was look for a place
to hide. In his search for an in-
conspicuous nook, Malcolm stumb-
led into the Student Publications
Building. "Eureka, I've found it,"
he cried in Grecian fashion, and
promptly joined the staff of The
Daily.
However, Malcolm claims, a
thwarted childhood desire was
still preying upon him.
"When I was small," the present
six-footer relates, "I was shunned
and avoided by my friends. I used
to while away the hours derailing
trains and telling myself jokes. I
decided when I grew up, I should
serve humanity by sharing these
gems of humor with them."
Malcolm is now managing edi-
tor of Gargoyle.
HIS OTHER assets include the
largest record collection in South
Quadrangle. "This," Malcolm said,
"I can state with positivity be-
cause my collection is a composite
of all the record collections owned
by South Quad residents."
He also plays a ukelele and will
sing upon request. Greater than
either of these accomplishments,
however, is his ability to make
music with two spoons. "They
laughed when I sat down at the
counter," Malcolm reminisced,
"but their jeers turned to leers."
And Malcolm duckeb his head
shyly and ran from theroom,
muttering under his breath,
"Garg's comning out Wednesday."
Giehrr ra

Trial Drug
May Aid TB'
Sufferers
New hope for Tuberculosis suf-
ferers may lie in a new drug which
the University Hospital is ready
to use if reports on its effective-
ness in trial use prove favorable.I
The reports, to be made at a
medical conference in Boston,
May 26-30, are based mainly on
200 test cases at New York's Sea
View Hospital.
HERE AT the University the
new drug, known to medical sci-
ence by the jaw-breaking name
of isonicotinic acid hydrazide, has
been tried oni only one, seemingly
hopeless, patient who had not res-
ponded to other types of treat-
ment.
According to Dr. Winthrop N.
Davey, Assistant Professor of
Internal Medicine, it is "too
early to tell" if the drug has
been effective. Treatment was
begun four weeks ago, but so
far x-rays show no noticeable
improvement.
The eager public will be unable
to buy the new medicine on a phy-'
sician's prescription until it is ap-
proved as "satisfactory and safe"
by the Federal Food and Drug Ad-
ministration. This approval is ex-
pected in May or June.
Meanwhile, first reports on the
drug appear hopeful.
Patients regained their appe-
tites and made substantial gains
in weight-some as high as forty
to fifty pounds.

IFC Ball
All fraternities who have not
turned in money and tickets for
the IFC Ball by 5:00 p.m. Mon-
day will be charged for their
whole ticket allotment, accord-
ing to Eli Schoenfield, '53, tick-
et chairman for the dance.

* * *

* * :

State Choirs,
Glee Clubs
Arrive Today
About 5,500 Michigan high
school students are scheduled to
pour into Ann Arbor today for the
southern section of the Michigan
State Vocal Association Choir and
Glee Club Festival.
Some 70 high schools will be re-
presented at the affair. High
schools in the northern section will
have their festival in Mount Pleas-
ant today.
Schools in the Ann Arbor area
to be heard in the festival include
Ann Arbor High School, Clinton,
H o w e 11, Lincoln Consolidated,
Pinckney and South Lyon high
schools.
Taking part in the three classes
of competition will be 110 choirs
and glee clubs rated superior at
district festivals.
A f t e r separate concerts, at
which each of the three classes
will sing, all of the groups will
combine for a massed concert at
2:30 p.m. in Hill Auditorium. Di-
rector at the concert will be May-
nard Klein of the University
School of Music.

International Week will begin its
activities in a truly global atmos-
phere today with an international
bazaar from 2:30 to 9 p.m. in the
League lobby.
Clothing, jewelry and pottery
will fill the booths at the bazaar,
which is being sponsored by the
International Committee of Stu-
dent Legislature.
For the fancier of oriental food,
the Chinese Students Association
is holding a Chinese buffet supper
as the second event of the Week
at 6:30 p.m. tomorrow at the In-
ternational Center in the Union.
The menu consists of yang tsai
salad, soy bean sauce chicken,
roast pork Chinese style, shrimp
and peas, dry shrimp and Chinese
cabbage, rice, almond cookies and
tea.
Tickets are $1.25 per dinner and
may be purchased at the door.

GLOBAL ATMOSPHERE:
International Week To Begin Today

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
FOR SALE--Students look over the silk and cashmere articles
from India which are part of the items on sale at the International
Bazaar today at the League.

ENSIAN Distribution
Fri. & Sat., May 16-17
at Student Pub]. Bldg.

r

I1

.-

1

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
MALCOLM EMERGES TO GARGOYLIAN HEIGHTS
Campus Calendar.

Cast of 'Goodbye My Fancy'
Busy Both On and Off Stage

GENERATION
PICNIC
Postponed until
Saturday, May 77

i

Mothe

deserves

r .
the

-Best!

Give her a treat
on her holiday.
DINNER at

Events Today
HONORARY DINNER - Retir-
ing Professors Samuel Daria and
Leigh Young and previously re-
tired Professor William Kynoch
of the School of Natural Resources
will be honored at a testimonial
dinner at 6:30 p.m. in the Union.
VISITORS-Fifteen officers of
the 2706th Research and Develop-
ment training group, U.S. Army
Reserve Corps, at Toledo will visit
the Engineering Research Insti-
tute.
During the one-day tour, the
group, under the command of Lt.
Col. William McDaniel, will see
the illumination laboratory,the
metal processing and Army Ordi-
nance Gage laboratories and a
demonstration of an electronic
analog computer. -They will also
visit the high temperature meta-
lurgy laboratory.
A E. White, the Institute's dir-
ector, will address the group at a
luncheon at the Union.

Ann Arbor's Finest
/1/en el
RESTAURANT
126 E. Huron

CONFERENCE -Five fields of
business and economics will be
considered by University School of
Business Administration alumni at
2:30 p.m. today at the school's
22nd Alumni Conference in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
DUTCH-AMERICAN-An es-
timated 50 persons are expected
to attend the Mid-Western
meeting of the Netherlands-
America University League at 3
p.m. in the Rackham East Con-
ference Room.
s s .
CONCERT-Combining with the
Monroe Civic Orchestra, the 55-
member Ann Arbor Civic Orches-
tra will give a concert at 4 p.m. at
the Monroe High School.
* * *
Events Tomorrow
OPEN HOUSE-The University
Hospital will-be open to the pub-
lic from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in
celebration of its second annual
observance of "Hospital Day."
TV HOUR - The University
Television Hour will present a
discussion of the low level of
voting participation and the
reasons for it at 1 p.m. over
WWJ-TV, Detroit.
* * *
HILLEL - Kosher corn beef
sandwiches, potato salad and cokes
will be served from 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. at the Hillel Supper Club.
There will be a charge of 75c
for Hillel members and $1.00 for
non-members.

By MARGE SHEPARD
Off-stage as well as during re-
hearsals, the cast of the Drama
Season opener, "Goodbye My Fan-
cy," seem to be busy every min-
ute-playing cards, working cross-
word puzzles, or just talking.
Star Sylvia Sidney arrived in
Ann Arbor early this week and the
cast has been streaming in from
various parts of the country by
car, train and plane to prepare for
the Tuesday opening in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Although following a hectic re-
hearsal schedule from 2:30 to 10
Single admissions tickets for
all Drama Season plays will
go on sale at 10 a.m. Monday
at the Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre box office.
Opening at 8:30 p.m. Tues-
day is "Goodbye, My Fancy"
with Sylvia Sidney, which will
play through the week. Mati-
nees will be at 3:15 p.m. Thurs-
day and 2:30 Saturday.
IFC Petitions
Due Tuesday
Petitions for IFC chairmanships
and assistant chairmanships are
due by noon Tuesday, May 13, in
the IFC office in the Union, ac-
cording to Sandy Robertson, '53
BAd, vice-president of the IFC.
Positions are open on the fol-
lowing committees: rushing, so-
cial, publicity, human relations,
coordinating, and office manager,
Robertson said,
Erosion Contract
A $2,000 contract for research
on beach erosion along the Great
Lakes was awarded the University
yesterday by the State Conserva-
tion Department.

p.m. every day the cast still has
lots of off-stage moments to fill in
with coffee and a cigarette, a
game of bridge, crossword puzzles,
or a light novel.
DURING THE stream of "nor-
mal" conversation when several of
the cast are relaxing together,
puzzle enthusiasts Jean Caston
and Eugene Stuckmann are likely
to interject "What's a six letter
word meaning fore-mother," or
where's the New York Times, I
want'thehpuzzle." Miss Caston
plays Miss Sidney's sharp-witted
secretary in the play and Stuck-
mann is Mr. Pitt, a poetry-minded
physics instructor.
Eventually someone finds a
table, the cards come out and a
lively game of canasta or bridge
is organized, dropped and picked
up as the various players go on
for rehearsal.
Rehearsals were in the rough
stage last week, with the cast still
spending many hours studying and
brushing up on lines. One act oft-
en drags on all afternoon as minor
changes and improvisions are
made in the script in an effort
to achieve smooth perfection for
the opening performance.
In addition to their stage roles,
most of the cast have appeared in
the movies, television and on radio
shows. However, having started in
the live theatre, they regard the
other media as supplementary.
Radio is especially dull compared
to the stage, Beverly Dennis, who
plays the college president's lively
daughter, said. "There's no res-
ponsive audience," she said, "and
we have to stand still all the time."
That's also the reason she prefers
television to the movies.
Principles appearing with Miss
Sidney are stage and television
veterans David Orrick as the once-
charming but now stuffy college
president and Robert Webber, the
handsome Life photographer.-

III

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11

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
May 11-Adam and Fallen Man
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.

14

*

TRAVELER S
CHECKS
z SAFE
ro CONVEN IENT.
and can be
i CASHED ANYWHERE
QUICKLY
buy them at
THE ANN ARBOR BANK
Main and Huron Sts.
State Street at Nickels Arcade 1108 South Unviersity
COMPLETE BANKING FACILITIES

STAR
CLEANERS
1213 South University
3rd Anniversary
SALE,
333%

ENSIAN DISTRIBUTION Friday and Saturday,
May 16 and 17, at the Student Publications Bldg.

'1

discount

il

"E" days are less than two
weeks away. Your 1952'
Ensian will be distributed
all day Friday, May 16th,
and Saturday, 1

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar. Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. "Being Christian
Where It Counts." Dr. Large speaking.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Rev. Douglas
Williams, director of Dunbar Center will speak
on "Human Relations."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Phares Steiner, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Adult Grouo and Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Services: Rev. Edw. H. Redman on:
"Persistent Patience."
12:15: Fellowship Dinner-Lake Geneva Conf.
Films.
7 P.M.: Unitarian Students meet at East Lansing.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
Rev. Wm. P. Lemon, Pastor Emeritus
Rev. John Bathgate, Minister to Students
9:30 A.M.: Bible Seminar.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Bathgate.
6:30 P.M.: Guild Meeting Topic "Religion and
Marriage." Speaker, Wanzer Brunelle.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister-Leonard A. Parr
Director of Church School, Mrs. Gertrude B.
Couch
Student Work-Marilynn Paterson,
Robert Inglis
Director of Music-Harold Haugh
Organist-Howard R. Chase
10:45 A.M.: Church School and morning worship.
Dr. Parr's subject will be "Unconscious In-
fluence."
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild will meet in the Guild
{- -- -:- aicc n . y rc.. nn rrtu.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Associate Student Work Directors:
Marilynn Paterson, Robert Inglis
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School, Junior High - Adults.
10:45 A.M.: Church School, Nursery to 6th Grade.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Best Is None Too Good."
Student Guild: 7:00 P.M. programat the Guild
House. The Freshman Group of Guild will lead
discussion on "Loopholes of Democracy."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Wcshtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduini
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Veduin.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenow Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips; Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the pas-
tor, "The Christian and Ethics."
Sunday at 3:30: Meet at the Center for Outing,
Picnic Supper and Vespers, at Dexter-Huron
Park.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine
The Reverend Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koonz, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast, Canterbury House)
11:00 A.M.: Church School (Nursery - 9th Grade)
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Ellsworth E. Koonz.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club supper and Hymn
Sing.
6:45 P.M.: Seminar on Christian Living.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.

rt

r
x,

x

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev.
Press, "The Responsibilities of Churchmanship
-Learn Continuously."

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