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May 08, 1952 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THRSDAY, MAY 9, 1952

Time Reflects Changes in Styles,
Participation in Sports, Recreation

By BEA JOtINSON
How many times have older
generations referred to the up
and coming generation with dis-
gusted shaking heads-or ex-
claimed that they don't know what,
the younger generation is coming
to?
The new activities, trends and
fashion- fads of the new age always
seem to be regarded by Mom and
Dad as impractical, silly or dis-
gusting.
BUT AS citzens of the present
era, the activities and fashions
that existed at the turn of the
century seem- just as impractical'
y nd silly now.
When Grandma and Grandpa
were attending the University,
football and baseball were the
popular sports for the men but
what sports did the women en-
gage in?
The majority of the women
were so wrapped up in skirts, long
sleeved blouses and hose, that it
is hard to imagine one of these
"Gibson Girls" ever attempting a
dive off the high board at the
local swimming pool.

PERHAPS they didn't dive, but
they did go to the beach. Of
course, the results could not have
been too promising, because their
swim suits were a far cry from the
abbreviated versions popular to-
day.
For the jaunt to the shore,
the proper costume consisted of
a long linen duster which
reached from the chin to the
ankles. A hat with a tremendous
brim was worn to protect the
complexion from the rays of the
sun.
Around the hat was worn a veil
which tied under the chin and
completely covered the face.
* * *
TO GET DOWN to the bare
facts about the actual swim suit,
the skirt of the suit came daringly
to the middle of the calf while
under it bloomers reached to the
knee with long black hose finish-
ing the camouflage job.
To complete the outfit, grand-
ma wore high topped shoes and
tucked her hair in a cap. Of
course a gayly colored parasol
was carried at all times.
Yes, Grandma made an appear-

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A SWAN DIVE
INTO SUMMER with ...

ance on the beach in a strictly
adhered to fashion, but she never
went near the water.
* * * .
THUS GRANDMA was so in-
tent on guarding her complexion
that she couldn't risk participating
in active sports except strolling
through the park or playing cro-
quet on a shaded lawn.
Daring coeds that attended
the University at the turn of the
century secretly engaged in
working on the "Wrinkle," a
novelty magazine put out by an
all coed staff.
The following article concerning
the Wrinkle appeared in the Daily
in the spring of '99:
* * *
"THE EDITION of the Wrinkle
which appears today is the an-
nual Women's Edition. The edi-
tors' identity is' kept secret, os-
tensibly because of their maidenly
modesty. However as some of the
editorials savor of their usual ab-
struse facetiousness, the disguise
is probably adopted because no-
body wished to assume the respon-
sibility for the daring piece of
journalism. By careful study, un-
mistakeable traces of humor can
be found in some of the articles."
Dating back in '99 was a bit
modified. There were no picnics
in the Arb or movies to attend.
Dances in Waterman Gymna-
sium were the popular social in-
terest with the coeds attending
in groups of seven and eight to
give the men an opportunity to
become acquainted with them.
As the years faded away, the
length of the hemline faded to
new heights. When women were
given the right to vote it seemed
to emancipate them also from
their sheltered activities of the
past.
Hair buns were bobbed and the
women were financially able to roll
up their sleeves and really enjoy
life. Fashions adopted different
aspects of bygone styles with a
new modern twist.
Fashion styles may repeat them-
selves but the modern coeds now
practice a complete reversal in
the way of sports activities from
the bygone days.
Instead of covering up with
yards of material to protect their
complexions from the sun they
don suits that reveal as much as
possible to obtain that coveted
sun tan.
Any Michigan man will admit
that this practice is an improve-
ment even though he "wants a
girl just like the girlthat married
dear old dad."
Atomizers
Women are finding numerous
uses for the once uncommon gad-
get, the atomizer. Brilliantine or
hair lacquer carried in a tiny,
purse-size atomizer is handy for
a quick brush up for straggling
curls. Many women carry perfume,
cologne and toilet water with them
in atomizers as good grooming
aids. New atomizers come in tiny
sizes so lightweight that several
can be tucked in desk drawers or
purses.

-Daily-Don Campbell
FAVORITE FASHIONS-Hairdos of University coeds vary in
degree between long and short styles. The "ponytail," pictured on
the left, is a new campus fashion, while long and medium length
cuts are old favorites of college women.
NO PON IES, POODLES:
Coeds Reject High Fashion
For Hair StyleConvenience

Many Activities
Spark Campus
In Summer
Nearby Lakes, League
Prove Favorite Spots
For Picnics,_Dancing
By RUTH TORRANT
Baseball, picnicing, and tennis
are among the favorite activities
of the summer session student in
Ann Arbor.
For those who are perhaps
dreading long, hot evenings with
only a book and a coke to enter-
tain, the League council has plan-
ned an extensive program.
* * *
BRIDGE LESSONS will occupy
one evening with an opportunity
for those who wish to play in Lea-
gue sponsored tournaments.
Square dancing wil lalso be a regu-
lar feature at the League wit
lessons offered for those who can't
quite discriminate between a do-
si-do and an alamand left and
right.
Ballroom dancing lessons are
also planned. Last year a repre-
sentative from the Arthur Mur.
ray studio was in Ann Arbor to
give these lessons.
Dancing is sponsored by the
League every Friday in the
Round-Up Room and the last
dance of the summer session, the
"Beach Ball" in the League Ball-
room is fast becoming a tradition.
MANY LAKES around Ann Ar-
bor offer a place to swim, picnic,
or just.loaf in the sun. Silver Lake
features a free public bathing
beach and picnic tables.
A concession stand is always
well stocked for snacks. Walled
Lake has a miniature golf course,
speedboats, a midway and a
dance hall. Big name bands
often visit to play at Walled
Lake.
Whitmore Lake nearby offers
lockers, water slides, and docks
which can be rented for a small
fee. Clear Lake, near Jackson, and
Portage Lake are other favorite
spots.
LONGER JAUNTS can be taken
on a week-end because of the fact
that the lucky summer school stu-
dent is allowed to keep a car on
campus. Many students visit re-
sort towns in Michigan such as
Saugatuck, Grand Haven, or Pe-
tosky. Another interesting trip is
the Detroit zoo or the Irish Hills.
Sports can be pursued to the
enthusiast's content in Ann Ar-
bor during the summer. There
are two golf courses, the Muni-
cipal course and the University
course.
Night softball games are often
played. Burns Park on Wells street
is equipped with four tennis courts,
horseshoe pits, two softball dia-
monds, archery facilities, and vol-
leyball courts. Wines Field and
West Park also have similar facil-
ities.
TOURS OF Ann Arbor and vi-
cinity, including the Arb and the
Island, are fun to take by bike. A
lazy afternoon can be spent can-
oeing on the Huron River.
The Daily will be published dur-
ing the summer and offers a han-
dy way to keep up on other re-
creational activities.

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T'afletied Check Gingha,,

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FASHION PLATE NEWS
by fashion-wise
AOFA I

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BATHING SUITS by...
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" PETER PAN
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" WARNER
PRICED AND STYLED THE WAY YOU LOVE 'EM
Consult our expert corsetierres.
BUNNY LEE

By MARILYN CAMPBELL
For the most part, University
coeds are not followers of the lbair-
do dictators of the fashion world.
Each new hair style is carefully
scrutinized, its merits weighed and
accepted or rejected.
THUS THE high-fashion "pony-
tail" nd "poodle cuts" are seen
only Infrequently on campus. Per-
haps one of the main reasons for
this is that few women have long
enough hair these days to dress
in a "ponytail."
Too, after seeing pictures of
women who are letting their
once "poodle cut" hair ,grow
long again, most coeds are im-
mediately discouraged. After all,
who wants to look like an Afri-
can bushman if she decides to
change her hair style?
Perhaps another of the reasons
for thi slack of fashion on campus
is that many men dislike these
styles.
A TYPICAL MALE comment is
that "ponytails look good on pon-
ies and poodle cuts on poodles, but
neither make a woman very at-
tractive."
A majority of coeds favor a
"just above the shoulder" length
bob. However, hair styles range
from the short mannish cuts
preferred by some women to the
almost waist-length growth of
hair of others.
Many women readily admit that
their hair styles are becoming
more and more un-feminine, but
feel that their choices are com-
fortable, practical and at least
somewhat attractive.

THE SHOULDER-LENGTH bob'
is practical in that it can be ar-
ranged to fit the occasion.,On the
tennis courts, canoe trips or in a
softball game, this style may be
gathered in "pigtails" or tied back
with a scarf.
Variation is also obtainedbin
wearing the hair pulled back
from the face for a "dress-up"
occasion and allowing it to fall
around the face for "everyday."
Hair-stylists from Paris were
unable to convince University co-
eds that "they too could have
green hair."
WHEN THE new idea of dyeing
hair different colors, such as pink,
green, blue or silver, with wash-
able dyes for formal affairs, it was
rejected here. Most coeds decided
that* they didn't want to look like
a rainbow.
When asked how she goes
about choosing a hairdo for a
big formal dance, one coed re-
plied, "I wash my hair, curlit,
comb it and pray that it doesn't
rain."
Hair-washing seems to be one
of the favoritet past-times of co-
eds. On the average each woman
washes her hair once a week, and
in many cases two times.
Grandma's old technique of
brushing her hair 100 strokes a
day has not been lost in these mo-
dern times either. Many faithful-
ly practice this ritual every day.
In this town every coed has one
big "gripe" to voice. "Why curl my
hair. It'll get straight in the rain
anyway."

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An important-looking gift of springtime
fragrance ... to mark a memorable day.
Both

is ihis Icb dark Loffee outfit, im-
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lovely different objects from all
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