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May 06, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'TUESDAY, MAY 6, 1952

i

FIRST DRAMA SEASON PLAY:

i

'Goodbye, My Fancy' Cast Announced

pla

The supporting roles in the first.
y of the Drama Season, "Good-

bye My Fancy," were announced
yesterday.
Supporting Slyvia Sidney will
be David Orrick as the college
president, Jean Casto as the wise-
cracking secretary and Robert
Webber as the clever magazine
reporter.
* , *,
OTHERS in the cast of "Good-
bye My Fancy" are Dorothy Duck-
woi'th, Cynthia Latham and Laurie
Lambert.
Orrick is an actor of twenty
years experience who has ap-

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Office Supplies
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BEVERLY DENNIS
peared with Katherine Cornell
in such plays as "Romeo and
Juliet," "Saint Joan," "The Bar-
retts of Wimpole Street" and
Anthony and Cleopatra."
In the role of the once-charm-
ing, now-stuffy college president,'
Orrick has been "Dr.'Merrill" to
Sylvia Sidney's "Agatha Reed" in
summer stock.
* * *
JEAN CASTO, who bears a

Phone
7177

striking resemblance to Shirley
Booth, takes the part which Miss
Booth first made famous on
Broadway.
Also having played in "Good-
bye My Fancy" before, Miss
Casto has taken the role of
"Woody" on Broadway, on tours
and in summer stock.
Robert Webber is also familiar
with "Goodbye My Fancy." He
has played the toughened maga-
zine reporter opposite Madeleine
Carroll, Ruth Hussey, and Sylvia
Sidney. Having had personal ex-
perience as the veteran he por-
trays, Webber, as an ex-marine,
puts. real understanding in his
characterization.
Another "old timer" of "Good-
bye My Fancy" is Beverly Dennis
who takes the part of Ginny, the
daughter of the college president.
Miss Dennis has played this in-
genue lead in New York, Phila-
delphia, Boston and Chicago.
'U' Appoints
New Literary
CollegeDean
(Continued from page 1)
been chairman of the Humani-
ties Committee since 1948.
Odegaard has been a member
of the U.S. National Commission
for UNESCO since 1949. He was
an advisor to the U.S. delegation
to the fifth general UNESCO con-
ference at Florence, Italy, in 1950,
whenhe also became vice-presi-
dent of the International Council
of Philosophy and Humanistic
Studies.
In 1949 and 1950 he was a dele-
gate to the Union Academique In-
ternationale in Brussels, Belgium
and to the organization's London
conference in 1950, serving as sec-
retaire adjoint since 1951.
Odegaard is married and has a
nine year old daughter.
Forsythe Honored
By HealthGroup
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, direc-
tor of the University Health ser-
vice, reecived the first disting-
uished service award to be given
by the American College Health
Association at its 30th annual
meeting in Boston.
The award was given for his
work in the movement to estab-
lish student health services in the
nation's colleges and for his pub-
lications in that field.
One of the Association's found-
ers, Dr. Forsythe has been a mem-
ber of Health Service since 1913.

St. Louis
Paper Wins
'52 Pulitzer
NEW YORK-P)-The St. Louis+
Post Dispatch's exposure of cor-
ruption in the Internal Revenue
Department today won that news-
paper its fifth Pulitzer Prize.
The 1952 Pulitzer award for fic-
tion went to Herman Wouk's novel
"The Caine Mutiny." Joseph
Kramm's "The Shrike" won the
Stage Drama Award.
* * *
OTHER PULITZER awards an-
nounced by Columbia Trustees on
recommendation of the Advisory
Board of Columbia's Graduate
School of Journalism included:
International Reporting -
John M. Hightower of the As-
sociated Press, "for the sustain-
ed quality of his coverage of
news of international affairs
during the year." Hightower is
diplomatic correspondent for the
AP.
National Reporting - Anthony
Leviero of the New York Times,
for an exclusive report on talks
between President Truman and
Gen. Douglas MacArthur at Wake
Island during their 11950 confer-
ence. Leviero's exclusive was pub-
lished April 21, 1951.
Local Reporting - George De
Carvalro of the San Francisco
Chronicle, for stories of a "ran-
som racket" extorting money from
Chinese in America who had rela-
tions in Red China.

By The Associated Press
Several freak tidal waves
surged onto the Michigan shore
off the Great Lakes today and
caused heavy damage to shoreline
property.
Apparently caused by a sudden
turn in the weather, the waves
slammed rhythmically from Lake
Huron onto the state's "Thumb"
area from Port Huron to Harbor
Beach. At the other corner of the
state, a series of waves washed
onto the Traverse City shoreline
from Grand Traverse Bay and
Lake Michigan.
* * *
LAKE EXPERTS said the great
waves may have been "seiche cur-
rents," natural phenomena caused
by extreme changes in barometric
pressure, wind or minor earth-
quakes.
Draft Extension
.Requests Due Now
Students whose draft defer-
ments are slated to expire in June
should write to their local boards
requesting an extension, Gordon
Hanson, selective Service Counsel-
lor advised yesterday.
The letter should inform the
board of the student's intention
of remaining in school, with the
deferment request based on either
class standing or a passing mark
on the yearly draft tests.

Freak Tidal Waves Surge
Onto Great Lakes Shores

Such currents have been ,
known to hit in the Lake Huron
and Georgian Bay area of On-
tario in the past. Canadian Do-
minion Weather Bureau offi-
cials said Monday's phenomenon
may have been a "seiche" caused
by a heavy thunder storm.
Its effect was multiplied by ab-
normally high water already be-
leaguering the state.
The first of the waves was re-
ported at 6:50 a.m. between Port'
Huron and the tip of the "Thumb."
At Port Huron Coast Guards
men measured the wave at 55
inches. It surged off the lake and
onto a residential street lining the
shore, flooding several basements.
SPA Will Discuss
German Problem
The Society for Peaceful Alter-
natives will meet at 7:30 p.m. to-
day in the Union to discuss current
problems in Germany.
According to SPA president
Berkley Eddins, Grad., the discus-
sion will include German unifi-
cation, the place of Germany in
NATO, and the danger of re-
Nazification. The meeting will be
open to all those interested.

Oil Strikers
Still Idle;
Supply Low
(Continued from page 1)
business at some filling stations,
but no serious shortages were re-
ported.
Big distributors said the worst
would develop about tomorrow if
the strike is not settled.
AS OF YESTERDAY, Michigan
presented a spotty picture.
Ann Arbor, Pontiac and Ad-
rian reported that the supplies
might dry up within 48 hours.
On the other hand, Lansing felt
no alarm. It reported supply good
until May 15.
In Detroit, the gasoline for mu-
nicipal services, including the po-
lice and fire departments, was re-
ported in question with the spread
of the strike.
Meanwhile, Secretary of the In-
terior Chapman said the Govern-
ment is not planning on nation-
wide rationing of automobile gaso-
line despite shortages here and
there.
Chapman told reporters at New
York he was "hopeful of a set-
tlement being reached in a few
days. The situation is very ser-
ious." He said it was likely a ban
might be placed on automobile
sports to conserve gasoline.

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GOOD SERVICE
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Phone 8950

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To College Men Now Preparing for Military Service

Here is valuable postgraduate training that
money can't buy! As an Aviation Cadet
you can receive instruction and training worth
thousands of dollars-at the same time you
are serving your country. You can choose-
immediately-between being a Pilot or Air.
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candidates to stay in school and graduate.
Seniors and students with two years or
more of college who anticipate early en-
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for the years ahead.
WHO MAY APPLY
AGE-Between 19 and 26% years.
EDUCATION-At least two years of college;
MARITAL STATUS-SingIe.1 -
PHYSICAL CONDITION-Good, especially
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HOW TO QUALIFY
I. Take transcript of col-
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birth certificate to your
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3. Accomplish Flying
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4t,. The Selective Service
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awaiting class assign-
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5. Immediate assign-
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July 19, August 19, Octo-
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