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May 03, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-05-03

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PAGE rO'M

THE- MICHIGAN~DAILY

SATURDAY, AY 3, 1952

__________________________________________________________________________ I I

Lunch Hour Break

Philosopher
Argues for
Freud Ideas
By BOB JAFFE
Joining forces with Sigmund
Freud, Prof. Abraham Kaplan,
visiting philosopher from the Uni-
versity of California, systemati-
cally refuted possible lines of logi-
cal criticism to the field of psycho-
analysis yesterday.
Addresing an overflow crowd in
the Rackham Assembly Hall, Prof.
Kaplan set the pace of his stand
with, "whether psychoanalytic
theory is accepted or rejected
should depend on empirical fact
and not on the nature of the logic
involved."
He went on to tear down some
of the predominant objections to
the field.
The first objection was that
the realm of psychoanalysis em-
braces things too mystical, too
abstract, too fantastic to be
plausible.
He pointed out that to say a
theory is too fantastic is merely
tosay that it is improbable but
not impossible. This condition,
which he referred to as 'low ante-
cedent probability' is not a suffi-
cient argument against the possi-
bility that a given event will occur.
"Another objection often raised
against psychoanalysis," Professor
Kaplan went on, "would run, 'the
trouble is that evidence brought
forward to prove psychoanalytic
theory is purely interpretive from
case to case'."
This, he said, is true not only in
this field but in all the "empiri-
cal" sciences as well. Thus, the
chemist, physicist and astronomer
all adopt an interpretive view with
regard to the material with which
they are studying, he noted.
"I am against setting out on
the royal road of logic and disre-
garding scientific observation,"
the professor emphatically con-
cluded.,
Seven Cadets
Meet Hatcher
Seven cadets from the Salvation
Army Training College in Chica-
go visited Ann Arbor yesterday.
A day-long tour which included
open air services, a radio program
and an interview with President
Harlan H. Hatcher was planned
for the group.
President Hatcher issued a cor-
dial welcome to the cadets and
spoke informally to the group.

'U' ZOOLOGIST:
Explorer Rates Fossils
AboveBig Game Hunting

Samaritan
DAVENPOR [, IA-(P)-Mar-
ion Cooke of Davenport report-
ed to police Wednesday that the
hub cap of his 19"1 automobile
was missing.
Later it was re turned to his
back porch with, the accom-
panying note:
"I'm sorry, it, won't fit.
Thank you."

'U' Scientist Awarded Medal

CHICAGO-(P)-Thomas Fran-
cis, Jr., University scientist who
was the first to discover the exist-
ence of more than one influenza
virus, will be honored by the Uni-
versity of Chicago.
Dr. Francis, chairman of the
Department of Epidemiology,
School of Public Health, will be

awarded the University of Chi-
cago's Howard Ricketts medal at
a scientific meeting in Chicago
May 12.
The Ricketts Medal, honoring
the late University of Chicago phy-
sician who died of typhus May 3;
1910, is a national honor in recog-
nition of outstanding medical work.

By JOYCE FICKIES
The traditional explorer's dream
of shooting tigers in India holds
no charm for at least one man on
campus.
Prof.Claude W. Hibbard, Cura-
tor of Vertebrate Paleontology at
the University Museums, prefers
indulging every summer in what
he considers the best sport of all
-hunting fossils.
"Fossil hunting has it all over
big game hunting," according to
the professbr, "because you never
know what you are going to find."
* * *
DURING Prof. Hibbard's six-
teen years of field-tripping for the
* . *

University and the University of
Kansas, he has come up with
many unique discoveries. His va-
cation time expeditions have
brought to the local museum and
laboratories fossil specimens from
tiny mouse jaws to huge elephant
teeth and camel skulls.
More than one hundred dif-
ferent kinds of mammals new to
science plus many discoveries of
unknown invertebrates are in-
cluded among his finds.
One of the trips' greatest con-
tributions has been the numerous
uncoverings of bird fossils. Little
more than a decade ago, it was
commonly believed that fossilized
bird remains were seldom found
in America.
In the past sixteen years, how-
ever, Prof. Hibbard's expeditions
have collected more than three
thousand separate bird bones-
enough to enable students to make
special studies of them.
* * *
THE BEST AND rarest finds
from trips go to the University
Museums for display. They also
provide valuable, and otherwise
inobtainable, teaching material
for classes in zoology and paleon-
tology courses.
In addition to supplying mu-
seum and classroom, the veter-
an explorer also instructs stu-
dents in field techniques while
he is hunting. Each year he
takes a party of interested stu-
dents to the west for a new
expedition.
This summer Prof. Hibbard and
his crew (four students) will go to
southwestern Kansas where they
will investigate a "very important"
interglacial fauna.
Ultimately, Prof. Hibbard says
he doesn't want to "take the credit
for the discoveries of the trips.
"The students should get the cre-
dit," he says. "After all, they do
all the hard work. I just show
them where to dig."
Indian Group
fetes Writers
Books will be awarded as prizes
to the winners of the essay con-
test sponsored by the India Stu-
dents Association at 6:30 p.m. to-
day at the annual Indian dinner
at Lane Hall.
In an attempt to foster inter-
national understanding on a local
scale, the Indian club provided an
essay contest on the topic of India
for the eighth grade students of
Ann Arbor schools this semester.

-*1

from
La rge Hats To Tiny Head Bands
All gathered together to
flatter YOU.
Mion sophistico
at $8.95
Other little hats
linen and pique
from $2.00

Above: A snap-on-
band of flowers and
velvet at $3.95

I I

4

f .
1

rte

4

Daily-Alan neid
TIME OUT--Under the nearly completed addition to Angell
Hall a workman takes a break for lunch.
* * * *"
dew Angell Hall Addition
Progresses To in tae

--Ramon Ross

of

The new addition to Angell Hall
is slowly but surely nearing com-
pletion.
What a short time ago appeared
to be merely a sprawling mass of
steel, scaffolding and brick, has
now begun to assume the form of
an almost completed modern
structure.
Construction began in the sum-
mer of 1950. The .work has been
progressing according to schedule
and completion is expected in Aug-
ust.
* * *
WHILE ON the inside, class-
rooms and lecture halls are be-
ginning to be shaped, activity on
the outside has taken a new turn.
Co-op Houses
Hold Midwest
MeetingHere
The University's Inter-Co-oper-
ative Council Is playing host to
a midwest area conference today
and tomorrow, as the concluding
activity of Campus Co-op Week.
Discussion at the meetings to be
held today at the First Methodist
Church will center around prob-
lems of organization, operation,
finance and management of stu-
dent co-operatives,
* * s
DELEGATES TO the conference
hail from the Universities of Tor-
onto, Purdue, Illinois, Michigan
State College and Ohio State.
"Through this conference,"
Ivan Gluckman, '52, ICC presi-
dent said, 'we hope to learn the
progress that is being made on
other campuses and to air our
own problems for possible solu-
tion."
Among the speakers will be Prof.
Harold Gerard, of the Group Dy-
namics Institute, and Lee Hiller,
President of the North American
Student Co-operative League. An
ICC party at Nakamura House will
conclude the day's activities.
The conference will end with a[
summary session at 9 p.m. tomor-
row at Owen Co-op, 1017 Oakland.

Limestone facings are being
applied to both sides of the old
Hall. The result will be a uni-
formly white limestone main
buildipg with a limestone dec-
orated brick addition.
Already installed within the
b u i l d i n g are electric units,,
soundproof ceilings, lavatory fa-
cilities and water fountains. Paint-
ing, flooring and decorating is ra-
pidly proceeding.
* * *
A PERSON wishing to see the
inside work need only to climb ov-
er the wire fencing and walk
through the entire project. The
workers, engaged in activities
ranging from sand shoveling to
oxyacetylene torch welding, seem
little disturbed by curious students
wandering through the building
or gaping from outside the fen-
cing.
According to a sign across from
the general library the Addition
will be ready for classes next
September.
Mwed Students
Get Awards,
Ten student research assistant-
ships have been awarded for the
Summer Session in the Univer-
sity Medical School.
The program is designed to give
the recipients an opportunity to
engage in research activity. Each
student will work on specific prob-
lems under the direction of a
member of the Medical School fa-
culty.
The recipients of the assistant-
ships are: Gerald D. Abrams, '55,
Lionel Finkelstein, '54, Henry L.
Green, '55, Peter Hamill, '53, Shat-
tuck W. Hartwell, Jr., '54, Paul W.
Gikas, '54, Gordon Verity, '54, Al-
lan S. Hubacker, '54, Douglas Per-
son and Oswald Clark, '54
Read Daily Classifieds

Two Concerts
Will Be Given
At HillToday
(Continued from page 1)
sidered by music critics one of the
world's finest violinists.
Gathered from Ann Arbor ele-
mentary schools, the traditional
Festival Youth Chorus under di-
rection of Marguerite Hood of the
University music school, will sing
"Song Cycle from the Masters," at
this afternoon's concert.
These youthful singers have
played a big part in the May
Festival season for almost forty
years.
"Symphony No. 5 in B Flat
minor" by Schubert will be the
Philadelphia Orchestra's offering
for the early concert. In this per-
formance the group will be direct-
ed by associate conductor Alexan-
der Hilsburg.

1

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1

f)

SA
More
Days1
To Mail
MOTHER'S DAY GIFT
~SUGGESTIONS
a a
1Pi'ice4' tn $1.00 eto $1Z S0
RUSSELL STOVER CANDY SUMMER PURSES
SUMMER JEWELRY RICHELIEU PEARLS
EATON STATIONERY PURSE GADGETS
BILLFOLD &KEY CASE PERFUME BOTTLES
COSMETIC KITS LINGERIE SETS
REVERE WARE WOOD SALAD BOWLS
KITCHEN GADGETS POTTERY VASES
BONE CHINA CUP & SAUCERS ROYAL DOULTON FIGURINES
RONSON TABLE LIGHTERS SILVERWARE NOVELTIES
CANASTA CARD SETS CARD TABLE COVERS
GLASS HOSTESS WARE POTTERY LUNCHEON WARE
PLACE SETTING FINE CHINA PLACE SETTING CRYSTAL
NEW MODERN SIMTEX TABLE CLOTHS WITH MATCHING NAPKINS
MOTHER'S DAY SPECIAL

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washteritov Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunc'ay School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
May 4-Everlastin g Punishment
11:00 A.M.: Prir nory Sunday School during the
morning servio~e;.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednctsday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading roc om is maintained at 339 South
Main Street vhere the Bible and all authorized
Christian Scierce literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purrchased.
The Reading Roctrn is open daily except Sundays
and holidays C4om 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, ckn d Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Largj, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ratimom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breb'kfost Seminar. Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "You Can't Go Home
Again." Dr. ILcirge preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Prof!. Kenneth T. Rowe, professor of
English, will as>eak on "Religious Drama."
Following Prof.. owe's talk, the religious
drama, "Dust if' the Road," will be read.
FIRST UNITAIRIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtentzw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Phares Steiner, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Aduilt Group. Kenneth Boulding-
"Academic Frev2,dom."
11:00 A.M.: Serryion, Prof. John Shepard "Psy-
chology of Sod ial Movements."
7:00 P.M.: No Student Group.
FIRST PRESBVT ERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtei*,Ny
Rev. Wm. P. Lemon, Pastor Emeritus
Rev. John Batlhgate, Minister to Students
9:30 A.M.: Bib'e Seminar.
10:45 A.M.: Wor,;hip Service. Sermon by Dr.
Kenneth G. Kei rh.
6:30 P.M.: Guild Meeting. Topic "Religion and
Mental Health." Speaker: Dr. John Morley.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utly, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sundafr morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Associate Student Work Directors:
Marilynn Paterson, Robert Inglis
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School, Junior High-Adults.
10:45 A.M.: Church School, Nursery to 6th Grade.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "My Father's World."
Student Guild: 7:00 P.M. program at Congrega-
tional Church. Bob Inglis, new associate dir-
ector of Guild, will speak on his tour of 90
American colleges and universities this year.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Veduin.
.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T.,Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "The Constancy of Christianity."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper-Program, with sound film, "Venture
of Faith."
Tuesday at 9: Bible Study, If John.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North.Division at Catherine
The Reverend Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koonz, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon
(followed by Student Breakfast, Canterbury
House).
11:00 A.M.: Church School (Nursery-9th Grade).
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Ellsworth E. Koonz.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club supper and dis-
cussion. "The Human Life of Jesus" and its
implications for our community life - The
Counsellor and the Chaplain.
6:45 P.M.: Seminar on Christian Living.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill & Forest Ave. Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:20 A.M.: Bible Class.
10:30 AM.: Trinity Church-10:45 Zion Church.
5:30 P.M.: Supper Meeting-Program at 7:00.

t
r
{

:

NO
WORRIES
with
Traveler's
Checks!
SAFE!
CONVENIENT!

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr, O.D., L.H.D.
Director of Church School, Mrs. Gertrude B.
Couch
Student Work-"Marilynn Paterson,
Robert Inglis;
Director of Music--Harold Haugh
Organist-Howand R. Chase
10:45 A.M.: Church School and morning service.
Subject of sertnon, "So They Finished the
Work."
Student Guild, 7:00i P.M.: Robert Inglis will speak

1'

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND

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