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April 26, 1952 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-26

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SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PGE

THE MICHIGAN DAILYv ___

nowE

Grants, Staff
Changes Get
Regents' Nod
(Continued from page 1)
TWO GRANTS were accepted
from the Monsanto Chemical Co
of St. Louis, totalling $3,500. The
funds will support a fellowship in
pharmaceutical chemistry and one
in general chemistry.
The Regents also approved
faculty appointments, adding to
the staffs of five of the Univer-
sity's schools and colleges.
Prof. John C. Kohl of the engi-
neering college has been named
director of the newly-created
Transportation Institute in the
engineering college.
* *- *
> STEPHEN H. SPURR of the
University of Minnesota was ap-
pointed professor of silviculture
in the School of Natural Resour-
ces.
The present chairman of the
Regional Wage Stabilization
Board in Boston 'and former
Northeastern University Profes-
sor, A. Howard Myers, will be-
come an associate professor of
industrial relations in the busi-
ness administration school.
Warren E. McConnell of Purdue
University was named assistant
professor of pharmacy.
Another addition to the busi-
ness administration school will be
Donald Lloyd MacDonald, now of
Oklahoma A&M College, who will
become assistant professor of in-
surance.
* s
MILDRED I. QUACKENBUSH,
currently supervisor of operating
rooms at Rochester (N.Y.) General
Hospital, will be assistant profes-
sor of nursing in the School of
Nursing, and also will serve as 'U'
Hospital's operating rooms super-
visor.
James George Knudsen of
Oregon State College has been
appointed assistant professor of1
chemical and metallurgical en-
gineering in the engineering col-
lege.
All appointments will be effec-
tive in September.
ALSO AT yesterday's meeting,
the Regents granted permission
for one faculty member to retire
and 22 others to take leaves of
absence, including 15 sabbaticals.
Approval for retirement went
to Prof. Richard A. Rossiter of
the astronomy department, ef-
fective the end of this calendar
year.
Prof. Rossiter has been n charge
of the Lamont-Hussey Observa-
tory at Bloemfontein, South Afri-
ca, since 1926.
Granted sabbatical leave for the
first semester next year was Prof.
Verner W. Crane of the history
department.
GRANTED sabbatical leave for
the second semester were Prof.
Elzada U. Clover of the botany
department; Prof. Frank L. Hunt-
ley and Prof. Henry V.S. Ogden
of the English, department; Prof.
Fred B. Wahr of the German de-
partment; Prof. Nathaniel Coburn
and Prof. Paul S. Dwyer of the
mathematics department; Prof.
Lewis & Ramsdell of the miner-
ology department; Prof; Charles
L. Stevenson of the philosophy de-
partment; Prof. Arthur W. Brom-
age of the political science depart
ment; Prof. Norman R.F. Maier
of the psychology department; and

Prof. Federico Sanchez y Escrib-
ano of the Spanish department.
Full year sabbatical leaves were
granted to Prof. Robert S. Ford
of the economics department;
Prof. Hans Smelson of the math-
ematics department, and Prof.
Harold J. McFarlan of the engi-
neering college.
Inraddition, the Regents adopted
memoirs expressing regret over
the recent deaths of two faculty
members, Prof. Roger L. Morrison;
of the engineering college and
Prof. George R. Moore of the
dentistry school.

-Daily-Matty Kessler
A "COUNTY FAIR" FLOAT WON SECOND PRIZE FOR SIGMA PHI EPSILON AND DELTA GAMMA

Residence Halls Faced'
With Potato Shortage

University students eating in the
residence halls may have to do
without their daily ration of po-
tatoes for the rest of the semester.
Notices, signed by Leonard A.
Schaadt, business manager of res-
idence halls, and Francis C. Shiel,
manager of service enterprises,
were posted in the dormitories yes-
terday notifying students of the
shortage.-,
"AT THE present time the dorm-
itories have a potato supply for
less than a week," Schaadt said.
Since the first of the year
Food Service has had difficulty
getting potatoes because certain
Steel Attorneys
Call Truman
Act 'Kingly'
(Continued from page 1)

handlers and brokers of the
scarce commodity have set up
black markets.
These brokers, who seem to have
cornered the potato market, have
had the existing supply certified
as seed potatoes by the govern-
ment in order to get a higher
price. They have refused to sell
these potatoes, which Schaadt
said are not really seed potatoes,
unless the buyer agrees to pay
cash payment above the OPS ceil-
ing or also buys a vegetable not
in demand, such as parsnips.
THIS SITUATION developed
because last year's production in
the northern or late producing
areas dropped sharply. It is the
output of these states that furn-
ishes the potato supply during the
fall, winter and early spring.
Because the University has
refused to agree to these meth-
ods, substitutes will be served.
Occasionally the students will
have potatoes on their dinner
plates, Schaadt said.
Iiistead of the fastly disappear-
ing spud, students may expect to
see more corn, macaroni, spaghet-
ti, rice or creamed foods, Shiel
said.
"We are now scouring the coun-
try for potatoes, but we will have
to wait until the Michigan crop is
harvested in July before the situ-
ation goes back to normal,"
Schaadt commented.
However, the Department of Ag-
riculture said yesterday that the
next ten days should bring con-
siderable relief from the potato
shortage that has been particu-
larly noticeable all over the Mid-
west.
New crop potatoes should be
moving to market in large volume
from Florida, Texas and Cali-
fornia by the early part of May,
.officials said.

Cheer Squad
Needs Men
Rose Bowl Journey
Beckons to Tryouts
A possible. Rose Bowl journey
lies tantilizingly before those who
become next year's varsity cheer-
leaders.
This of course is a pretty big'
"if," in the person of nine tough
football games. But whether they
head west on New Year's Day or
not, the eight-man squad which
will lead Wolverine cheers next
season will be cheering at six
home games, and will spout their
enthusiasm at grid contests at
Northwestern, Stanford and Ohio
State.
THE SQUAD will not be chosen
until just before the first football
game next fall; but beginning
Monday and lasting through May
9, Captain Don Hurst '53Ed and
gymnastics coach Newt Loken will
work every afternoon with all en-
thusiasts who wish to try for the
team.
Hurst emphasizes that no
special experience is necessary,j
and that anyone at all Inter-
ested is urged to go down to
the gymnastics room in the In-
tramural Building and join the
practice sessions.
Tnstruction in the front head-
spring and in good cheer-leading
form will be given, and the hope-
fuls are expected to practice these
things over the summer in prepar-
ation for the final selection of
the team next fall.
Five men-Hurst, Dunc Erley,
'52E, Larry Price, '55E, Remo Boi-
la, '53BAd, and Lee Krumbholtz
'54Ed - will be back from this
year's squad, but none of them
except the captain is assured of a
spot on next season's team.

Edmonson
Says Schools
Not Godless
'Continued from page 1)
Prof. James B. Edmonson of the
education school, at an afternoon
conference on education, attacked
public school officials and teach-
ers for "the gross misrepresenta-
tion of tax-supported institutions
as 'Godless' ".
They have, he accused, failed to
warn citizens of "the desire of
some persons to shake the faith of
American people in the public
school system in order to promote
support of private or church-dom-
inated schools,"
* . *
BESIDES, he pointed out that
the best interest of many churches
would not be achieved by formal
religious instruction in the public
schools.
He offered as a suggestion
that schools and churches
should combine to hold more
conferences on moral and reli-
gious education. By this means,
basic issues might be identified
and cooperative projects begun.
In a conference speech, Norman
E. Gronlund of the University's
Bureau of Appointments revealed
to the Teacher Placement Confer-
ence that the state's elementary
school teachers are going to be
overburdened again this year.
Figures indicate that Michigan
colleges will be able to supply only
half of the predicted demand.
On the other hand colleges re-
port a 50 per cent surplus of high
school teachers over the expected
demand.
The portrayal of teachers as
"queer characters" is a great han-
dicap in recruiting promising
young people for the teaching pro-
fession, a Western Michigan Col-
lege of Education official reported
at the same session.
The press, movies and radio
conspire to present the men teach-
ers as "absent-minded, bookish
and namby-pamby and the wo-
men as dour old maids of frump-
ish appearance."
Teaching as a profession needs
no apology, he said, "and it is
high time to point out its true
worth to our society and some of
the contributions that its members
make to the common welfare."
IMPORTED
^ JEWELRY
INDIA PRINTS O
SILK SCARFS
SWEETS FROM
HOLLAND
^ INDIA ART SHOP
I 330 Maynard St.
{ oo-o< ooo-o<-

Austin - Rose
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Austin of
St. Louis, Mo., announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Mary
to Hugh Rose, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Howard G. Rose of Hinsdale, Ill.
Both Miss Austin and Mr. Rose
are in graduate school.
Mr. Rose is affiliated with Aca-
cia Fraternity.
* * *
Gnau - Traves
Dr. and Mrs. F. W. Gasow of Bir-
mingham announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Sally Ware
Gnau to Neale Thomas Traves,
son of Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Traves,
'Wcky River, Ohio.
Miss Gnau is a junior in the lit-
erary college and is affiliated with
Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority.
Mr. Traves is Business Manager
of this year's Ensian and a mem-
ber of Phi Gamma Delta Fraterni-
ty, Druids, Toastmasters and
Mimes.
The couple plan to honeymoon
WAA Notices
The schedule for the week's soft-
ball tournament is as follows:
Monday at 5:10 p.m.-Kappa Kap-
pa Gamma I vs. Sigma Delta Tau
I*; Delta Delta Delta I vs. Pi Beta
Phi III*; Palmer II vs. Kappa Al-
pha Theta II*.
Tuesday at 5:10 p.m.-Stockwell
IV vs. Alpha Delta Pi I*; Delta
Gamma II vs. Kappa Delta I*.
Wednesday at 5:10 p.m.--Klein-
stueck I vs. Alpha Epsilon Phi I*;
Hollis I vs. Gamma Phi Beta I*;
Alpha Chi Omega II vs. Alpha Phi
11*; at 7 p.m.-Stockwell V vs.
Vaughan II*; Stockwell VII vs.
Angell II*; Henderson I vs. Angell
I*.
Thursday at 5:10 p.m.-Mosher

Parents Make Announcement
Of CoedEngagement Plans

SALLY WARE GNAU
* * *
in the west after their July wed-
ding.
* * *
Close - Seager
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Close III
of Lakewood, Ohio, announce the
cengagement of their daughter,
Mary Jane to Mr. Loren Morgan
Seager, son of Mr. and Mrs. James
Loren Seager of Kalamazoo.
Miss Close is a junior in the
School of Education.
Mr. Seager, a junior in the lit-
erary college, is affiliated with
Sigma Phi Fraternity.
Their wedding is planned for
June 14.
II vs. Alpha Xi Delta I*; Delta
Zeta I vs. Jordan II*; at 7 p.m.-
Couzen's I vs. Alpha Phi I*; Jor-
dan vs. Newberry II*.
The starred team' will be re-
sponsible for taking care of the
bases and the home plate and the
other team for the basket contain-
ing the playing equipment.

Music Society
Honors Coeds,
MakesAward
Mu Phi Epsilon, national profes-
sional music sorority, will honor
freshmen women music students at
a musicale at 4:30 p.m. tomorrow
at the home of Mrs. Albert Logan,
1710 Cambridge.
Special recognition will be given
to the following freshmen for at-
taining the ten highest scholastic
averages: Ann Young, Linda Reck,
Camilla Heller, Frances Hauss and
Jane Stoltz.
The list continues with Ida Ny-
berg, Carolyn Lentz, Ann Plota,
Ann Wescott and Shirley Lowe.
Ann Young will be presented
with a medal for maintaining the
highest scholastic average of the
freshmen women.
Performers in the program are
Nancy Philbin, pianist; Sue Hen-
drian, soprano; Mary Seavoy, flu-
tist and Carol Eagle, pianist.
At this time, the sorority will
install its new patronesses, Mrs.
Harlan Hatcher, Mrs. Roscoe Bon-
isteel and Mrs. William Palmer.
Theta Sigma Phi
Names Officers
Theta Sigma Phi, professional
honorary journalism fraternity,
has elected new officers for the
coming year.
Elected as president of the group
is Connie Hart. Other officers of
the organization are Jo Scherer
as vice president; Sue Kenitz, trea-
surer and Wendy Delcamps as sec-
retary.
Women are selected for the hon-
orary fraternity on the on the basis
of journalistic activities and grade
average.
One of the annual projects of
the group is a workshop held in
the spring with guests from De-
troit who are active in journalism.
An initiation banquet will be
held May 22

held May 22
II I

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

Scientist

prices would have to be boosted
$12 a ton to offset higher costs en-
tailed in a government-recom-
mended wage boost.
THE INCREASE authorized yes-
terday will average 2.6 per cent,
based on a hike of $2.84 a ton for
carbon steel, which accounts for
about 90 per cent of steel output.
OPS said the increase will be a
little higher on such other types
as alloy and stainless steel.
Plans to allow the increase
had been announced earlier.
The OPS action clears the way
for steel companies to apply for
it. There have been signs that
Secretary of Commerce Sawyer,
nominal boss of the seized in-
dustry, may order it into effect.
The price hike was authorized
under the Capehart provision of
the Economic Controls Act, which
directs that ceilings shall allow
for cost increases up to last July
26. It thus precludes considera-
tinn for any wage increase granted
since then.
This was the second time the
industry had gone into court ask-
ing that Truman's order be struck
down. The first unsuccessful ef-
fort followed immediately the
seizure order, issued the night of
April 8. Another federal judge
ruled then the companies had not
shown they were damaged.

t
s

9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
April 27-Probation after Death
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Tetimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
,(Disciples of Christ),
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister)
Associate Student Work Directors:
Marilynn Paterson, Robert Inglis
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School, Junior High - Adults.
10:45 A.M.: Church School, Nursery to 6th Grade.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship: University stu-
dents will conduct the service. Theme: "Chris-
tians and Frontiers of World Fellowship."
Student Guild: Picnic supper and sports at River-
side Park. Meet 5:30 at Guild House. In case
of rain, supper at 6:00 at Guild House.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Veduin.

READ and USE
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

i

11

0

* IT'S SAFE
* IT'S EASY TO DO
* IT'S MORE
CONVENIENT
when you
BANK BY MAIL
at

* LEAP YEAR
WOMEN COME STAG
MICHIIGRAS
Field House Open 7 P.M.-1 A.M.
Shows - Games - Refreshments
General Admission 40c
PRIZES

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar. Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship: Dr. Paul Hutchinson, edi-
tor of the Christian Century, and Henry M.
Loud Lecturer, will speak on the subject, "The
Word of the Lord."
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Dr. Hutchin-
son will be our guest speaker. His topic will
be, "How to Overcome a College Education."'
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily!
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Phares Steiner, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group-Prof. Pres-
ton Slosson on: "Academic Freedom."
11:00 A.M.: Services: Edward H. Redman preach-
ing on: "Unitarianism and Issues of War and
Peace."
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Students at Lane Hall.
Mr. Sonoh Dharmgrongartame on: "Buddhism
--Faith of 500,000,000 People."

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor /
Sunday at 10:30 A.M.: Regular Worship Service.
Sunday at 5:30 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper and Program. Panel dis-
cussion, "Christian Liturgics."
Tuesday at 9:00 P.M.: Bible Book Review, "True
Christian Brotherhood" (Philemon).
Coffee Hour at 9:45.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine
The Reverend Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koonz, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain .
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast, Canterbury House)
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Bruce H. Cooke.
11:00 A.M.: Church School (Nursery-9th Grade)
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club supper and discus-
sion.
6:45 P.M.: Seminar on Christian Living.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.

11

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
Rev. Wm. P. Lemon, Pastor Emeritus
Rev. John Bathgate, Minister to Students
9:30 A.M.: Bible Seminar
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service
Student Meeting: 6:00 P.M. Picnic Supper and
Installation of Officers., Speaker: Dean James
B. Edmondson.

jj FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING Lane Hall I

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