100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 19, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 1952

El

t

Slosson Hits
Inconsistent
GOP Policy
By VIRGINIA VOSS
Prof. Preston Slosson of the his-
tory department last night told
the crowd at a local Jefferson-
Jackson Day dinner that Demo-
crats can offer voters a choice
between a definite stand and "no
policy at all."
"You look in vain for a real
alternative or a consistent policy
in the Republican party," Prof.
Slosson noted. "But on every is-
sue, you find Democrats in the
state and nation taking a definite
stand."
PROF. SLOSSON spoke before
a banquet for campus Young
Democrats. Stressing campaign is-
sues rather than personalities, he
attacked Republican stands on
foreign policy, "creeping social-
ism" and government economy.
Republican foreign policy,
Prof. Slosson said, aims at
doubled results with diminished
funds." Citing Democratic party
unity on foreign policy, Prof.
Slosson hit the Republican party
for their "fatal division on for-
eign affairs."
.The GOP issue of "creeping
socialism," he said, "sounds sinis-
ter but doesn't'mean a.thing."
o* *
THE REPUBLICAN stand on
government economy stresses
economy in general, which every-
one favors, rather than particular
methods of attaining it, Prof.
Slosson explained.
Because of the Republican inter-
nal divisions, Prof. Slosson thought
that Gen. Eisenhower is sure to
offend either the right or left wing
of the party when he begins cam-
paigning.
He concluded that the duty of
Democratic party members should
be to "convey to voters that they
should have a right to choose be-
tween responsibility and irrespon-
sibility in government."
Help Needed
For Mieigras
Fran Windham, '53, Michigras
decorations' co-chairman has is-
sued a call for workers to help put
up the carnival decorations in
Yost Field House, beginning at 2
Pa. tomorrow.
The booths' committee has also
sent out a call for men to help
with booth construction Tuesday
through Friday. Anyone interested
is asked to report to a meeting at
5 p.m. Monday in the Union, ac-
cording to Gerry Maraulo, '52,
booths' co-chairman.
Author To Discuss
Book on Peace
Under the auspices of the Coun-
cil of Arts, Science and Profes-
sions, John Somerville will lead an
informal discussion of his new
book, "Philosophy of Peace," at
5:30 p.m. today in the Conference
Room of the League.

Lucky Old Sun

Campus
Calendar
Events Today
DISPLAY-A colorful collection
of Ukrainian national art includ-
ing handwork in woodcarving and
embroidery, the Ukrainian nation-
al emblem, clothing, leather pho-
tograph albums and national dolls,
will be on display in the Interna-
tional Center until tomorrowa
* * *
Coming Events
MOVIES - Slides of Parisian
scenes and a French movie, "Sail-
ors of Normandy," will be shown
at the International Center's week-
ly program at 8 p.m. tomorrow at
the Center and again at the
French Club meeting at 8 p.m.
Monday in the League.
* * *
SPEECH-The Rev. James H.
Robinson, pastor of the Church of
the Master in Harlem, will speak
on his experiences during a recent
tour of twelve European and Asi-
atic countries at 7:30 p.m. Mon-
day at the Presbyterian Church on
Washtenaw and S. University.
The founder of many interra-.
cial organizations when abroad,
Rev. Robinson was frequently har-
ried by Communists eager to find
flaws in the American racial pic-
ture.
LECTURE-Dr. Martha Baylor,
of the department of zoology, will
lecture on "The Biology of Virus-
es" at 8 p.m. Monday in the East
Lecture Rm. of the Rackham Bldg.
under the sponsorship of Phi Sig-
ma honorary fraternity.
* * *
MUSIC-Two guest lectures, Dr.
Eberhard Preussner of Austria and
Prof. John Bishop of Australia,
will discuss music education in
their countries at 7:15 p.m. Mon-
day in Rm. 506 of Burton Memor-
ial Tower.

EGYPTIAN SCULPTURE:
Rare Dancing Girl Find
Home in 'U' Museum

* * *

By MIKE WOLFF
A rare sculptured portrait of a
dancing girl which once adorned
the tomb of an ancient Egyptian
nobleman has been acquired by
the Museum of Archaeology.
The limestone relief belonged to
a vast collection formed by M. A.
Mansoor of Cairo and Heliopolis
before it was obtained by the
Museum at an auction at the
Parke-Bernet galleries in New
York.
ACCORDING TO Prof. Enoch
Peterson, the Museum's director,
the tomb from which the relief
comes is believed to be the sole
source of this type of portrait.
Prof. Peterson added that the
Achaeology Museum is the only
one he knows of that possesses
this 18th dynasty (1400-1377 B.C.)
"non-stylized" art form.
The dancing girl is unusual
because the Egyptians of tha.t
period invariably reserved the
walls of their tombs for images
of royalty. Prof. Peterson point-
ed out that the free and easy
style of the portrait shows the
girl was not' a member of the
royal family.
To many people, the archaeolo-
gist continued, the style of the
portrait represents_ the peak of
Egyptian art. Belonging to an era
when Egypt politically and eco-
nomically ruled the East, the life-
like sculpture shows a trend away
from the stiffness which many
people believe typical of Egyptian
art.
The dancing girl was probably
part of a series of dancers on the
tomb's wall, Prof. Peterson sug-
gested. Explaining the reason for
such a portrait, he noted that the
Egyptians usually decorated their
tombs with scenes from their lives.

Singers Will
Visit Here
Ann Arbor is playing host today
to more than 600 high school sing-
ers for the southern half of the
Michigan State Vocal Association's
annual solo and ensemble festival.
Representing 45 southern Michi-
gan schools the festival will hold
sessions at Ann Arbor High School,
the Union and other University
buildings.
Ten soloists and three ensem-
bles groups are entered from Ann
Arbor High, and other area schools
will be represented.
Professors Thelma Lewis, Philip
Duey, Harold Haugh, Wayne Dun-
lap and Mary Fishburne, and Ar-
lene Sollenberger of the Univer-
sity school of music will serve as
judges.
A similar but smaller portion of
the festival for the northern part
of the state will be held at Mt.
Pleasant.
y . .

... adorned tomb
Sigma Nu To Hold
Birthday Dinner
Sigma Nu fraternity will hold
its 50th anniversary banquet at
7:15 -p.m. today in Rm. 3-KLM
of the Union.

-Daily-Alan Reid
FOLLOW THE SUN-Three lovelies take advantage of the spring weather and hold a small chess
tournament in the back yard of Martha Cook. Hoards of sun-worshippers dotted lawns and porches
yesterday as old sol spread his degenerating rays over spring-struck students.
LOW COST LEARNING:
Edmonson Hits Fraudulent Schools

MAROON SCHWINN BICYCLE - Good
condition. $20. Call Stu, 2-0805. )71.

"Bargain" educations completea
with engraved diploma, and at-
tached gold seals may be had for
the money at more than 1,000
fradulent schools existing in the
country today, former Dean James
B. Edmonson of the University
School of Education said yester-
day.
As chairman of the National
Committee on Fraudulent Schools
and Colleges, Dean Edmonson
mentioned this in his report to
the National Education Associa-
tion meeting in Chicago.
He cited examples of what he
called the "underworld of Ameri-
can education." Edmonson cited
an institution in Chattanooga,
Tenn. which guarantees a degree-
hplder that he will become a "na-
tural generator, condenser and
storage battery of bio-phycho-
dynamics" besides being fully
qualified to ministerto person
suffering from everything from
nervous indigestion to imbecility.
* s
ALTHOUGH THE committee
finds it impossible to even estimate
the annual income of the gradu-
ates of these institutions, Dean
Edmonson said he would "have no
reason to question the assertion
of an investigator that 'upwards of
25,000 phony psychologists are
operating in the United States'."
Such gyp schools turn out
Doctors of Divinity by mail in
the dozen lots. Reports received
by the committee indicated a
low-cost divinity school in New
York City which offered degrees
ranging in price from $1.25 to
$100. Within a two-year period,

j

the operators had cleaned up
$8,000.
According to Dean Edmonson,
the students who purchase these
worthless degrees seem about
equally divided between those who
do it knowingly for the purpose
of deceiving others and those who
honestly think it is of value.
A list of approved institutions
of higher learning is published
annually by the United States
Office of Education.
DEAN EDMONSON'S commit-
tee has been assisted by the work
of the House Select Committee to
Investigate Educational, Training
and Loan Guaranty Programs un-
der the GI Bill. In its 1952 report
this committee stated that the
greatest amount of fraud occurred
in the field of trade schools cater-
ing to the veteran student.
Although the American Associ-
ation of Theological Schools has
assisted by warning churches and
colleges against holders of fraudu-
lent degrees, the dean pointed out
.': s":
lie'S
He found out that i
and 60 cents to d
7:30 TO
7:30 TO

the committee's greatest obstacle
in cleaning up the academic skid
row is apathy on the part of the
states. Many state governments
make almost no attempt to estab-
lish educational qualifications.
Dean Edmonson stated that to
his knowledge, the State of Michi-
gan is free of these diploma mills.

This customer got
I -day results through
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

I

11,

1

I

W,

r, .



III

II

.n, s
;

I

r' ti r
f?' , s F P , E~.
; ' 4

I'

at

State Street at North University

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave. !
r
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
April 20-Doctrine of Atonement
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South%
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr, O.D., L.H.D.
Director of Church School, Mrs. Gertrude B.
Couch
Sunday-10:45 A.M.: Church School
(All Departments)
10:45 A.M.: The service will be conducted by
Dr. La Mont Okey.
The Sermon'-"An Epistle To The Americans"
will be Dr. Preston Slosson's subject.
The Student Guild will meet from 7:00 to 8:00
P.M. in the downstairs church parlor. Members
of the Ann Arbor Friends Meeting will lead a
discussion on "Reality and the Spirit."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland n sWangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar. Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship: "On Controlling Your
Judgments," Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program: Prof. Lenski
will be our guest speaker. His topic is "Reli-
gion-the Opiate of the People."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily!
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill & Forest Ave. Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:20 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M. Trinity Church-10:45 Zion Church.
5:30 P.M.: Meeting at Center--Program 7:00.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Associate Student Work Directors:
Marilynn Paterson, Robert Inglis
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School, Junior High - Adults.
10:45 A.M.: Church School, Nursery to 6th Grade.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship
Sermon: "Activating Our Best."
Student Guild: 7:00 P.M. program, Congregational
Church. Guests from Young Friends Society
will speak and lead discussion on "Reality
and t} e Spirit."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M:: Evening Service, Rev. Veduin.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "Effects of the Resurrection."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Election of next
year's officers.
Tuesday at 9:00: Bible Study and Coffee Hour.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and-Student Counselor
Betty Lou Cooke, Assistant Student Counselor
9:45 A.M.: Bible Study.
11:00 A.M,: Morning Worship "1 Go Fishing."
6:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Dr. Khalifa,
advisor to the Moslem Religious Association
will speak on "Means of Salvation."
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETINGLone Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.

L

11

r

m

STAR DRY CLEANERS
1213 South University

y,
IV
{
h
1

i

SPRING SPECIAL

I

for a limited time only

DRY CLEANED -SPOTTED- PRESSED

3
for the
price of
dry
cleaning I

Men's
suits
overcoats
topcoats

$100

each

or

for $200

3

combination of either

Ladies' $400 each or 3 for $200
dresses of
coats combination of either

for the
price of

2

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Phares Steiner, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship-Sermon: Uni-
tarianism, Democracy, and 18th Century Con-
cepts of Law.
., r) n, - W rin a ,w -o e e..f 1 r - un f

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine
T e Reverend Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
T e Reverend Ellsworth E. Koonz, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Church School (Nursery-9th Grade).
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Dr. Lewis. (Holy Communion. Sermon by the
Rev. Dr. Lewis (Fiwst Sunday of Month).
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club Suooer and address

sweaters
skirts
shirts

S c each

or .3

for 100

dry
cleaning

II

It 1

I

I

III

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan