100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 17, 1952 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 17, 1952

6

LIFETIME STUDY:
Walt Whitman Collection
On Display at Library
4-/1-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

CLASSIFIEDS

1

11

V.

By CYNTHIA BOYES
One of the most complete col-
lections of the life and works of
Walt Whitman ever compiled is
now on display in the General Li-
brary.
The collection is the result of
the life time hobby of a Detroit
businessman, Charles Feinberg,
who has been a lover of Whitman
since his early days in school.
Feinberg acquired hil first
Whitman book "American Roses"
forty years ago for ten cents. Since
then he has built his collection of
Whitman works into one of the
finest in the world.
A highpoint of his collecting ex-
perience was the acquisition of one
of Whitman's personal copies of
"Leaves of Grass." The salesman
Fairgrounds
May Be Sold
To Ann Arbor
A new angle to the all-ready
confusing problem of the disposi-
tion of Ann Arbor's Fairgrounds
was suggested yesterday by Earl
Martin, one of the early members
of the Washtenaw County Fair
Society.
Martin, who was requested to
appear before the County Board
of Supervisors at their meeting
Tuesday to discuss the early his-
tory of the Association, proposed a
new Fairgrounds plan supported
by 36 life members of the society.
According to the proposal, the
society would transfer the prop-
erty to the Supervisors, who would
then sell it to the city. The funds
remaining after group obligations
were paid would be used for the
erection of an agricultural build-
ing on a site other than the pres-
ent Fairgrounds.
Martin told the Supervisors that
they may already own the Fair-
grounds since an offer to sell the
property to the county was made
three years ago and has never
been legally rescinded.
The muddled problem has been
increased by the fact that no one
seems to know exactly who the
members of the society are or how
many they are. According to a poll
of members made three years ago
the board was given the authority
to proceed with the transaction.

who showed Feinberg the copy
thought is was ruined because it
was filled with written notes. These
were later revealed to be in Whit-
man's own hand-writing.
THIS MONTH, in honor of the
60th anniversary of Whitman's
death, Feinberg has lent his col-
lection to the University for dis-
play in the General Library.
Among the items in the ex-
hibit are criticisms and biogra-
phies of Whitman, and manu-
scripts and corrected proof
sheets of "Thoughts of Colum-
bus," his last poem.
The first edition copies of poetry
and prose include "When Lilacs
Last in the Dooryard Bloomed," a
poem written in memory of Abra-
ham Lincoln. Whitman, who was
a great admirer of Lincoln, often
gave lectures about him. Programs
and notes from some of these lec-
tures appear in the case on Whit-
man and Lincoln.
AN ENTIRE CASE is devoted to
"Leaves of Grass," one of the
poet's most famous works. Whit-
man kept adding, rearranging and
revising "Leaves of Grass" and
many of the editions are on dis-
play, including the copy of the
book which Whitman sent to
Emerson. This highly-prized item
is owned by the University library.
Cancer Talk
To Be Given
By Karnof sky
Dr. David Karnofsky, an asso-
ciate of the Sloan-Kettering Insti-
tute for Cancer, New York City,
will discuss "Research in Cancer"
at 1:30 p.m. today in the School of
Public Health Auditorium.
The talk is being presented by
the Washtenaw County Medical
Society and the Ann Arbor Field
Army of the American Cancer So-
ciety in conjunction with the Can-
cer Month program.
Dr. Karnofsky will also address
the regular monthly meeting of the
county medical group at 7 p.m.
today in the Allenel Hotel.
In addition to his work at the
Sloan - Kettering Institute, Dr.
Karnofsky is on the faculty of the
Cornell Medical School and is a
member of the Cancer Center of
New York.
He has been active in cancer re-
search, particularly in the use of
chemical agents in the treatment
of cancer, and has written exten-
sively on the subject.
He received his Doctor of Medi-
cine degree from Leland Stanford
University in 1940.
Tickets for 'Ida'
Still BeingSold
The second performance of
"Princess Ida" will open at 8 p.m.
today in Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
ter.
Tickets for the Gilbert and Sul-
livan operetta may still be pur-
chased at the Lydia Mendelssohn
box office. Prices for tonight's per-
formance are 90 and 60 cents. The
operetta will run through Satur-
day.

The Daily Officia Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11
a.m. on Saturday).
THURSDAY, APRIL 17,1952
VOL. LXII, No. 134
Notices
Convocation Honoring Queen Juliana.
A Convocation of the University will be
held at 11:15 a.m., Thurs., April 17, in
the Rackham Lecture Hall, in honor of
the visit of Queen Juliana of the Neth-
erlands. It will be open to students,
faculty, and the general public up to
the capacity of the hall.
Faculty members are asked to parti-
cipate in the academic procession,
which will assemble at 11 a.m. in the
Graduate School office. Academic cos-
tume will be worn. Those who expect to
participate in the academic procession
are asked to leave their names with Dr.
F. E. Robbins (campus telephone 2645),
as special seating will be arranged for
the faculty section.
All College of LSA Students who
plan to take summer work elsewhere
should call for approval blanks at the
Admissions Office, 1524 Administration
Building before June 1.
omen students are expected to pay
t fie second half of their League House
bills by Fri., April 18.
Seniors and Candidates for Degrees
in Graduate School. Today and Friday
are the last days that you may order
your commencement announcements,
personal cards, and booklets, in Lobby
of Administration Bldg., from 1-5 p.m.
State Board Examinations for Regis-
tration of Engineers, Architects, and
Surveyors, are to be given in June
1952. The deadline for filing applica-
tions is May 1, 1952. Application forms
may be secured from the office of Dean
G. G. Brown, 259 W. Engineering Bldg.
Teaching Opportunities in the Chi-
cago Public Schools: The .Director of
the Bureau of Teacher Personnel, Chi-
Steel Crisis
Blame Laid
To Truman
WASHINGTON - () -- Senator
Bridges (R-N.H.) accused Presi-
dent Truman yesterday of being
the principal creator of the crisis
that led to seizure of the steel in-
dustry.
Secretary of Commerce Sawyer,
in an apparent preliminary to a
government grant of a pay raise
over the heads of the companies,
conferred separately with Presi-
dent Philip Murray of the CIO-
Steelworkers and President Benja-
min Fairless of U.S. Steel Corp.
PRICE STABILIZER Ellis Ar-
naIl ruled out anew any such steel
price increase as the $12 a ton
the companies have said they
would need to cover the govern-
ment recommended pay raise
which is the nub of the dispute.
He said they would get "noth-
ing" as a price for peace though
he has said all'along they can
have some $3 a ton under regu-
lar stabilization rules. He took
his stand in a National Press
Club luncheon speech and de-
fended it later in a Senate hear-
ing.
Inland Steel Company took a
new tack in efforts to get an anti-
seizure court order, seeking a
declaratory judgment that the ac-
tion is illegal. Several companies
are asking an injunction in federal
court here. Inland chose its home
grounds at Hammond, Ind., for
the test.
A group of senate Republicans
headed by Bridges sponsored a
resolution for a judiciary commit-
tee investigation of the seizure,
which Bridges called an act of
"usurpation" that has "raised the
gravest constitutional question

since the war between the states."

cago Public Schools, will be at the Bur-
eau of Appointments and Occupational
Information on Thursday, 1-4 p.m., and
Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., to interview
candidates for elementary and secon-
dary teaching positions. Thursday aft-
ernoon, 4 p.m., there will be a group
meeting in Room 25, Angell Hall for
all education students interested in
the opportunities for new teachers in
the Chicago Public Schools. For further
in formation call at 3528 Administra-
tion Building or telephone University
Extension 2614.-
Summer Employment: Students in-
terested in summer employment will
have an opportunity to examine the
Bureau of Appointments' personnel re-
quests from camps, resorts and indus-
tries, Thurs., April 17, from I to 5 p.m.,
Room 3B, Union. Those students who
have not yet registered for summer
employment may do so at that time.
A representative from Childcraft
Books, a Marshall Field Enterprise, will
be in Room 3G, Union, Thurs., April 17,
from 9 a.m, to 5 p.m. to interview men
and women students interested in sales
positions for the summer.
A representative from Russell Kelly
Office Service of Detroit will be in
Room 3B, Union, Thurs., April 17, from
1 to 5 p.m. to talk to interested women
students for summer office positions
in the Detroit area.
A representative from Vita-Craft Cor-
poration, an aluminum cooking uten-
si sales organization from Kansas City,
will be in Room 3B, Union, Thurs.,
April 17, from 1 to 5 p.m. to talk to
interested students in sales work for
this summer.
Contact the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration, for further details.
Personnel Requests.
The Automobile Insurance Co., Hart-
ford, Conn., has openings in their Feld
Organization with training in Hartford
and later placement in the Midwest.
The Springfield Armory, Ordnance
Corps, Springfield, Mass., is in need of
Metallurgists with an Interest in the
small arms field.
Harry Ferguson, Inc., Detroit, has
openings for Mechanical or Industrial
Engineers. They are interested in peo-
ple who are interested in farm machin-
ery and will come to the campus to
interview if there is sufficient interest.
The Anchor Hocking Glass Corp.,
Detroit; has openings for men interested
in Sales positions. Their sales are to
food, beverage, beer, wine, and pharma-
The Illinois Civil Service, Springfield,
Ill., announces examination for the
following positions: Bacteriologist II
and III; Biochemist I and II; Dietitian
I, II and III; Food Chemist II; Im-
munologist I; Mechanical Engineer I,
II and III; Public Health Nurse I, II
and III. Further details are available at
the Bureau.
Headquarters Fifth Army, Chicago,
has sent an announcement of openings
for women interested in commissions
in the women's Army Corps. Applica-
tions must be in by May 1.
The City of Los Angeles, California,
has an opening for a Civil Engineer.
It is announced that seniors in their
final semester are eligible to take the
examination for the opening.
The Veterans Administration, Wash-
ington, D.C. announces openings for
Biochemists, Bacteriologists, and Sero-
logists. Detailed information is avail-.
able at the Bureau of Appointments.
The Philco Corp., Philadelphia, has
available positions for Engineers I~
their Research and Development Qual-
ity Control, and Production Depart-
ments.
The University of Michigan has an
opening for a Research Assistant with
a degree in Physics, Chemical Engi-
neering, or Metallurgical Engineering.
For further information, application
blanks, and appointments, contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Admin-
istration Building, Ext. 371.
Personnel Interviews.
The American Brakeblok Division of
the American Brake Shoe Co., Detroit,
will have a representative here on
Tues., April 22, to talk to men inter-
ested'in Industrial Sales positions,
The Canada Life Assurance Company,
Jackson, Mich., will be here Tues.,
April 22, to see men for Life Insur-
ance selling leading to possible Branch
Supervisory work or Management or
Head Office appointments.
The J. L. Hudson Co., Detroit, will
be here on Tues., April 22, and wed.,
April 23, to see men and women grad-
uating in June for their Executive
Training Program and also to see young
men with one year of Accounting for
their Control Division.
IBM will have a representative on the
campus from Detroit on Tues., April
22, to see men for Sales positions in
their offices throughout the United

States and also they are interested in

Mathematicians and Physicists with
M.S. or Ph.D. degrees for placemenin
principal cities in the United States.
For appointments call the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administration
Building, Ext. 371.
Lectures
The Thomas M. Cooley Lectures, fifth
series. General subject, "Perspectives in
Conflicts Law." Third and final lecture:
"Basic Factors: Survey of Conflicts
Rules in Specific Fields of Law." Pro-
fessor Hessel E. Yntema, Research Pro-
fessor of Comparative Law. 4:15 p.m.,
Thurs., April 17, 120 Hutchins Hall.
University Lecture, euspces of the
Department of Near Eastern Studies.
"Islamic Art: The Book" (illustrated).
Dr. Richard Ettinghausen, Associate in
Near Eastern Art, Freer Gallery of Art,
Washington, D.C. Thurs., April 17, 4:15
p.m., Room D, Alumni Memorial Hall.
University Lecture. J A. Westrup,
Professor of Music, Oxford University,
will lecture at 8:30 p.m., Thurs., April
18, in the Rackham Amphitheater, in
connection with the annual meetings
of the Mid-West Chapters of the Am-
erican . Musicological Society and the
Music Library Association. He will speak
on "Towards a History of English Mu-
sic." The public is invited.
University Lecture, auspices of the
College of Architecture and Design.
"The Modern Sculptor and His Mater-
ial" (illustrated). David Smith, of Bol-
ton Landing, New York, sculptor. Fri.,
April 18, 4:15 p.m., Architecture Audi-
torium.
Academic Notices
Preliminary Examinations for the
Doctorate in Linguistics will be given
on Fri., May 16, and Sat., May 17. Stu-
dents preparing for these examinations
are asked to inform Prof. Hans Kurath,
5208 Angell Hall, which examinations
they will be ready to take.
Aero Seminar: Dr. Gordon Patterson
of the University of Toronto will talk
on "Shock Tube Investigations," Thurs.,
April 17, 4 p.m., 1042 E. Engineering
Bldg. Interested students, teaching, and
research staff welcome.
Astronomical Colloquium. Thurs.,
April 17, 4:15 p.m., the Observatory. Dr.
Stanley P. Wyatt, Jr. will speak on "A
Radio Model of the Galaxy."
Seminar in Electrochemistry. Lazarus
D. Thomas wil speak on "Semicon-
ductors," Thurs., April 17, 7 p.m., 1036
Chemistry Bldg. Visitors are welcome.
Seminar on Transonic Flow. Fri.,
April 18, 4 p.m., 1508 E. Engineering
Bldg. Drs. J. R. Sellars and J. E. Broad-
well will discuss the work of J. Cole
on the drag of a wedge at, high sub-
sonic speeds.,
Doctoral Examination for Cleobelle
Harrison, Education; thesis: "A Study
of the Trends in the Certification of
Secondary-School Tgachers of Art and
ln the Objectives of Such Teaching,"
Thurs., April 17, East Council Room,
Rackham Bldg., 10 a.m. Chairman, F.
D. Curtis.
Doctoral Examination for Maurice
Andre Brull, Aeronautical Engineering;
thesis: "A Structural Theory Incorpor-
ating the Effect of Time-Dependent
Elasticity" Thurs., April 17, 1077 E.
Engineering Bldg., 2:30 p.m. Co-Chair-
men: E.J. Lesher and P. F. Chenea.
Doctoral Examination for Fred S.
Cook, Edication; thesis: "A Study to
Determine the Predictive Value of the
Detroit Clerical Aptitudes Examina-
tion," Fri., April 18, 3011 University
High School, 3:00 p.m. Chairman, J. M
Trytten.
The University Extension Service an-
nounces the following new classes:
Short Course in Personal Typewriting.
This course, offered as an experiment
by the Extension Service, the School
of Education, and the School of Busi-
ness Administration, is being repeated.
The intensive six-week class presents
the basic fundamentals of touch type-
writing for personal use and is design-
ed for those who have only a minimum
amount of time available for formal
training. Fred S. Cook is the instructor.
Registration, $5.00. Thursdays, begin-
ning April 17, 7 p.m., 276 Business Ad-
ministration Building.
Cancellation. Seminar in Applied Ma-
thematics. Meeting April 17 is cancelled
because of Prof. M. H. Stone's lecture.
44c to 5 P.M. Weekdays
Eves. & Sunday 65c

-Today and Friday-
LEIGNLAWFORD

Psychology Colloquium. Fri., April 18,
4:15 p.m., Kellogg Auditorium. Dr. P. S.
Shurrager, of the Illinois Institute of
Technology will speak on "Spinal Con-
ditioning.'
Concerts
Student Recital: Benjamin Shanklin,
baritone accompanied by Robert Dumm,
pianist, will be heard at 8:30 Thurs-
day evening. April 17. in the Rackham
Assembly Hall, in a recital presented in
lieu of a thesis for the Master of Music
degree in Music Literature. Mr. Shank-
lin is a pupil of Arthur Hackett, and
his program will be open to the public.
Events Today
Chess Club. Re-organizational meet-
ing, 7:30 p.m., at the Union. Discussion
of a Chess Tournament and matches
with Wayne University is on the agen-
da. After the meeting those present
will play chess. All those interested are
invited.
Modern Poetry Club. Meeting, 7:30
p.m., Ann Arbor Room, League. Poems
to be discussed are: Louis MacNeice's
"Bagpipe Music," "Snow," and "Per-
seus;" John Manifold's "The Sirens."
Mr. Allison of the English department
will participate. Open to the public. All
poems are found in Oscar Williams'
anthology.
Albert Schweitzer Seminar, Lane Hall,
7 p.m.
Soaring Club. Meeting, 7:30 p.m., 1042
E. Engineering Building. All interested
students are invited.
Deutsche Kaffeestunde. German Cof-
fee Hour. 3 to 4:30 p.m., Round-Up-
Room, League.
U.S. Navy Aviation Cadet Program.
Lt. Eugene T. McNamara will be avail-
able today for interviewing interested
students at the Michigan Union
throughout the day.
La p'tite causette meets from 3:30
to 5 p.m. in the south room of the
Union cafeteria.
Alpha Kappa Psi, Professional Fra-
ternity in Business Administration and
Economics, Rushing smoker, 7:30 p.m.,
Chapter House, 1325 Washtenaw.
International Relations Club. Import-
ant business meeting for all members,
Thurs., April 17, 7:15 p.m. in Rm. 3K
of the Union.
Civil Liberties Committee. Meeting,
7:30 p.m., Union. Discussion of contin-
ued action on Lecture Committee, and
discussion of National Student Confer-
ence. All members must have paid their.
dues by the beginning of the meeting.
U. of M. Sailing Club. Meeting, 7:30
p.m., 311 W. Engineering. Shore school
on sailing theory. Informal sailing and
instruction Saturday and Sunday at
Whitmore. There will be a dinner to-
night with the U. of Toledo Sailing
Club at a downtown restaurant at 5:45.
All U. of M. SailingClub members are
invited. Call Joanne Anderson for de-
tails.
Coming Events
Motion Pictures, auspices of Univer-
sity Museums. "Navajo Indians," "N1av-
ajo Children," and "Painting with
Sand." Fri., April 18, 7:30 p.m., Kellogg
Auditorium. No admission charge.
Inter-Guild Retreat will be held April
18, 19, and 20, at the Methodist Youth
Camp at Port Huron. The topic for
discussion is "The Place of. Prayer in
the Life of a Christian." Make reser-
vations and transportation arrange-
ments at Lane Hall or your guild.

LOST AND FOUND

LOST-Pet Blue Parakeet (Forest and
South University Area). REWARD.
Phone 2-9806 )43L
FOR SALE

Your Official UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN RING is waiting
for you 2- NOW - at
Burr Patt's. 1209 S. Univ.

)58

GABARDINE DRESS PANTS-$5.49. Ad-
vertised in Life at $7.50. Colors:
brown, blue, grey, teal, tan. Sam's
Store, 122 E. Wash. Ph. 3-8611. )50
INDIA MOTORCYCLE SALES-Author-
ized B.S.A. and Sunbeam Dealer. 207
W. Liberty. Phone 2-1748. )33
35mm CAMERAS; Argus f:3.5, Agfa f:3.5,
Dollina f:4.5. Phone 5700. )77
FOR SALE - 2 season tickets to May
Festival. Phone Jerry at 2-8796. )78
DIAMOND RING-EMERALD-CUT, 0.85
carat, flawless, blue-white, plain plat-
inum mounting. Expensive but a
bargain. Call 2-4693 evenings. )79
CONTAX II, Sonnar F:2 lens. Don
Hudler, Apt. 530, 1448 U. Terrace. )82
1940 FORD in fair condition. $125. Call
Don Hinchman, 2-2252. )81
1941 FORD SEDAN in excellent condi-
ticn. Reconditioned motor, $285. Eve.
at 1325 S. Univ. Apt. 3. )83
OAK WALL CASE-27x28, glass sides,
17-in. glass door. Call 2-7822. )84
POLY PHASE, by-lateral stabelizer, type
C complete with dyatron, viscous
mogulator, 3 filled d-shells. A give
away at $15. Call 2-4693. )85
CUSHMAN Scooter, excellent condition.
Must sell. Reasonable. 2-1458. )86
PARAKEET BABIES and breeders, Cock-
ateels, Canaries, Cages, Supplies, Eng-
lish Setter Puppies. 912 Brown. Phone
2-2403. )87
MAN'S British bicycle, one speed, $24.
Contact Waldner, 423 High St. )88
MOTORCYCLE -British light-weight.
Very good condition. Phone 2-4591.
Ask for room 406 Green. )89
MISCELLANEOUS
STARTING SUNDAY-Each day 1 boy
and 1 girl will receive a free ticket to
THE MICHIGAN THEATER if their
name appears in our Classified section.
Watch carefully for your name.
APPLICATION PHOTOS-3 day service.
Wed. and Sat. hours 10-4. Palmer
Studio, Michigan Theater Building.
) 21M
SPECIAL-on Poodle Permanents, com-
plete - $5.00. Modern Beauty Shop.
117 S. Main, Ph. 8100. )20M
THE best cosmetics are "BEAUTY
COUNSELORS". Try them. Men's and
Women's. Phone 2-5152. )5M
NOW IS THE TIME
Let the U & M DRY CLEANERS AND
LAUNDRYdo your cleaning, low rates.
One-day serv. no ext. 1306 So. Uni.
)23P

PERSONAL
U & M CLEANERS and Laundry. Shirts
18c ea., Laundry 7 lbs. for 56c. 1 day
service no extra. 1306 So. Uni. )22P
STARTING SUNDAY-Each day 1 boy
and 1 girl will receive a free ticket to
THE MICHIGAN THEATER if their
name appears in our Classified section.
Watch carefully for your name,
RENEW THRU US-and let us take care
of all your headaches via telephone.
Student Periodical, 6007. )20P
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )6B
TYPING-Reasonable Rates. Accurate
& Efficient. Phone 7590. 830 So. Main.
)1B
TYPEWRITER & Fountain Pen repair
work a specialty. Typewriters, Adding
Machines and W /C Tnpe and Wire
Recorders. Morrill's, 314 S. State St.
) 9B
RENTAL TYPEWRITERS - Repairs on
all makes. Office Equipment Co. 215
E. Liberty. Ph. 2-1213. )5B
APPLICATION PHOTOS while you wait.
4 for $1. Snider Studio, 213 S. Main.
Phone 7431. Hours 9-11, 2-5. )11B
FOR RENT
APT. HUNTING? - Try Apt. Finding
Service at the Campus Tourist Home.
Rooms by day or week. Kitchen Priv.
518 E. William St., 3-8454. )5R
LARGE, LIGHT, first floor double -
Hollywood beds, private entrance,
kitchen privileges if desired. Also
small basement room in exchange for
caretaking. 1019 Church St. Phone
6876 evenings. )16P
HELP WANTED
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS wanted.
Men who will be available for 10
weeks; one who is experienced as a
riflery instructor and others for gen-
eral camp counselling. Experience not
necessary. Call 2-9454, evenings 6-7.
) 19H-
SECRETARIAL HELP-Part-time satis-
factory. Insurance experienced pre-
fered. Walt Springer, 206 E. Huron,
2-3107. )21H
YOU CAN EARN one thousand dollars
this summer. Here's your opportun-
ity for pleasant profitable summer em,
ployment with a MARSHALL FIELD-
owned Company. Openings for college
men and women to assist home state
director of Childcraft work. Ask for
Mr. Gibson, Room 3-G, Michigan
Union. Thursday, April 17, 10 to 4
p.m. )22H
ROOMS FOR RENT -
APARTMENT for 4 graduate men. Fur-
nished, private bath. First floor, pri-
vate entrance, close to campus., Call
2-5255. )24R
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED --Ride to Schenectady, N.Y.
May 1. Call 3-1561- 5047 Kleinstueck.
)21T

REWARD
The young man or young
woman who attends business
school is usually rewarded in
these ways:'
A good salary
A chance for advancement
Interesting work
Security for the future
You can earn these rewards
in a surprisingly short time
by attending Hamilton day
or evening classes . . . New
classes start Monday, Eve-
nings, Tuesday. Bulletin free
on request.
HAMILTON BUSINESS
COLLEGE
State & Williams
Ph. 7831

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

Hillel. Friday evening services,
Hill Street. The service will be
ducted by the student council.

1429
con-

PHOTOS COPIED
20 Wallet-Size 00
De Luxe Prints
Original picture returned.
Send any size photo or negative.
Federal Wallet-Size Photo Co.
P. 0. Box 2448 Kansas City 6, Mo
(No C. O. D.'s Please)

YOUTH BED with steel springs in
fine condition. Half price.
This customer received
3 -day results with
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

Wesleyan Guild: Square Dance in the
lounge at 8 p.m., Fri., April 18. Every-
one is invited.

n

Starting 44c
TODAY LJL65c

until 5 P.M.
after 5 P.M.

:- a

'- Sri -

-fwithi ather'
A UNIVERtSALINTERNATONAL 9ICYLRE

I

f

I

UI

Also
"Kiddin' The "That Man Worldt
Kitten" Rickey"
Cartoon Sport Oddi
Sunday
THE JANE FROMAN STORY
"With A Song In My Heart"

News
ty

Rexall Semi-Annual
ONE-CENT SALE
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
APRIL 17-18-19
SWIFTS DRUG STORE
340 S. State St. Phone 2-0534

I

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY,
'resent s
"PRINCESS lIDA"
at
vLdi. M dud ccnbnu Thnatarn'

Ph. 5651

An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations
STEWART

VIVIEN

LEIGH*-GRANGER
"CAESAR AND
-m1e -=m a i A ymW'n A gr

wthEiS SIONE ."M IILYN [RSINE -MCHAROI ANOERSOI
Also
WALTER PIDGEON
"CALLING BULLDOG
DRUMMOND"
-- Coming Saturday -
JEFF CHANDLER
"Battle Of Apache Pass"

I

i

I

I

to

-I b. ma - £ V .NIir____ - I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan