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April 16, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

FIVE 'U' DELEGATES:

Newcomers

Meeting Stresses Role
Of Citizen in Foreign Aid

By CARA CHERNIAK
Five University students, along
with 1500 other individuals rep-
resenting over 300 national organ-
izations, gathered together in
Washington last week for what one
called "perhaps the most signifi-
cant meeting of the year."
The National Conference on In-
ternational Economic and Social
Development was designed to ac-
quaint the groups represented with
conditions and problems of under-
developed areas, and to indicate
how Americans can directly aid
those in foreign countries.
* * * -
KEY SPEAKER at the biparti-
san meeting included President
Truman, Secretary of State Dean
Acheson, Supreme Court Justice
William 0. Douglas, Director of
Mutual Security W. Averell Harri-
man and many other leaders in
labor, religion, foreign affairs,
business and education.
Conference Chairman was
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President John A. Hannah of
Michigan State College.
Although students were in the
minority at the conference, Avrea
Ingram, vice-president of the Na-
tional Students Association, point-
ed out that students would like to
have more of a voice and take
more of an active part in assist-
ing foreign countries.
"Students are anxious to par-
ticipate, but find no jobs open for
them in this area," Ingram said.
"Instead of going into the armed
forces, many would like to use
their college training for techni-
cal assistance in underdeveloped
areas of the world."
* * *
KEYNOTE SPEAKER at the
conference was Iresident Truman,
who pointed out that the two ideas
that guide his Point Four program
are "cooperation, freely sought and
freely given, and help to those who
want to help themselves."
"This is not starry-eyed ideal-
ism," he continued. "It is just
plain, practical common sense.
[If we fail to do this job, we will
never have world peace. We can-
not survive as an island of pros-.
perity in a sea of human misery.
But if we do the job, the world
will be transformed."
In his speech to the conference,
Justice Douglas called for a "Point
Five" to be added to the Point
Four program.
"That point five," he said, "is
the American Revolution, the ap-
plication of a few good, simple, old-
fashioned ideas based on Ameri-
can ideals of freedom and justice."
"Put Point Five behind Point
Four," Justice Douglas said, "and
then we'll begin to see things hap-
pen in Asia."
Stressing that he believed
Point Four had accomplished
many useful things, Justice
Douglas was nevertheless sharp-
ly critical of its operations in
many parts of the middle East
and Asia.
"Why," he asked, "should Amer-
dcan taxpayers' money be used to
make a handful of landowners in
parts of Asia richer than ever while
adding little to the welfare of the
working people who receive as lit-
tle as 5 or TO percent of the crops
they raised."
"I think," he said, "that we need
an entirely fresh point of view else
this great civilization of the West
may disappear and the hopes of
the little people of the world be
destroyed."

County Men
To Inspect
MeatSupply
Dr. Otto K. Engelke, director of
the Washtenaw County Health
Department, announced yesterday
a renewed effort is now being
made to block the sale of unin-
spected meat in the county.
All restaurants and food sellers
have been asked to list their
sources of meat supply. Engelke
said the names would then be
studied to determine whether all
meat for human consumption here
comes from properly licensed and
inspected packers,
s * a
TWO WEEKS AGO an un-
marked truck carrying uninspected
meat was found in Ann Arbor.
The city has already issued a
"John Doe" warrant which will be
served on any person found vio-
lating a local ordinance against
peddling illegal meat.
Because there are no state or
county laws preventing the sale
of unlicensed meat, violators in
Washtenaw County outside the
Ann Arbor city limits would pro-
bably.have to be prosecuted under
an existing general health statute,
Dr. Engelke said.
Doctors To Meet
The Michigan Society of Ob-
stetricians and Gynecologists will
hold its annual meeting here, with
about 100 members expected to at-
tend the meeting at 2 p.m. to-
morrow in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.

v

In the late spring of 1950, the
old Art Cinema League faded from
the University campus, and a new
organization was born-the Stu-
dent Legislature Cinema Guild.
During the first year of its exist-
ence, the Guild had a paid attend-
ence of $4,780. Spurred on by this
success, SL sponsored six movies
last summer, and the ensuing prof-
its enabled it to pay for losses sus-
Call for Union
OperaSeripts
With the final curtain barely
down on the 1952 Union Opera,
the call is out for scenarios for
next year's production.
"We hope to revert to the prac-
tice of performing the opera in
December," Jim McGlincy, '52,
Mimes president revealed, "but we
need scenarios soon in order to
produce a mid-winter show."
In the 1920's, the opera was an-
nually given in December and fol-
lowed by a tour that reached from
coast to coast, McGlincy related.
He emphasized that completed
scripts are not needed. The best
scenarios will be selected and their
authors asked to submit completed
scripts for the final judging. The
winning script will be chosen be-
fore the end of the school year.
Scripts may be turned in to the
Union main desk.

tained by four co-sponsors during
the regular year.
This year, the movies have net-
ted over $1,000, with small losses
on only three films.
ORIGINALLY TAKEN over by
SL to bolster the faltering league,
the new arrangement called for
the following revisions:
(1) A movie would be shown ev-
ery week-end during the school
year, co-sponsored by SL and a
student organization chosen by
petition.
(2) Any recognized group
would be eligible to petition, and
the week-ends would be selected
by a special SL-Cinema League
board, composed of the SL treas-
urer, the two members-at-large,
chairman of the culture and
education committee and one
other SL member.
(3) The co-sponsor would split
the profits, or the loss, with SL,
80% to 20%.
Later the profit split was re-
vised, with 10% going into an in-
surance fund to cover future
losses.
Dick Kraus, Grad., former Daily
sports editor, has managed the SL
project since its initiation in 1950.
Selection of movies has been left
entirely up to him.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

SL Cinema Guild Ends
Second Successful Year

IN THE BLACK:

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1952
Senator Taft
To Give Talk
Here Today
{Continupd from page 1)
In November of 1951, a na-
tionwide Gallup poll of Repub-
lican county chairmen showed
Taft a three-to-one favorite over
second-place Eisenhower.
Taft's long political career had
its foundation in state politics with
several terms in the Ohio House of
Representatives and one term in
the Ohio Senate.
He has served in the U. S. Sen-
ate since 1939. Chairman of the
Senate GOP Policy Committee
during the 82nd Congress, he has
also served on the Labor, Public
Welfare and Finance Committees.
As a Presidential nomination
hopeful, Taft was Ohio's "favorite
son" candidate for the GOP Pres-
idential nomination in 1936 and
1940. In 1948, he came closer to
the Republican nomination as
runner-up to Gov. Dewey in the
GOP National Convention.
Second Cooley
Lecture Today
Prof. Hessel E. Yntema, research
professor of'comparative law, will
deliver the second in the Thomas
M. Cooley Lecture Series at 4:15
p.m. today at 120 Hutchins Hall.
Subject of Prof. Yntema's talk
will be "Policies: Considerations
Controlling Choice of Law."

:

WELCOME ADDITIONS-With an eye toward doing something
about the existing ratio, these two pleasant Latvian DP sisters,
Ziggi (left) and Karman Berzins pose for cameras after arriving
in New York. They don't plan to come to the University.

Ps ycholo gist
Speaks Today
At LaneHall
Dr. Fritz Kunkel, noted Los An-
geles psychologist, will speak at
8:30 p.m. today in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall, bn "The Differing Dy-
namics of Psychology and Reli-
gion."
Former president of the German
branch of the International So-
ciety of Individual Psychology, Dr.
Kunkel began his career as a law
student, then turned to medicine
and received his MD from Berlin
University.
As.a practicing psychiatrist in
Munich and Berlin, he studied
with several disciples of the
school of Jungian psychology
and was the founder of "we-
psychology," which draws from
religious and philosophical con-
cepts.
He came to the United States in
1939 where he took up a lecture-
ship in the Pacific School of Reli-
gion at Berkeley, California. He
later began work as a consulting
psychologist on the staff of the
First Congregational Church in
Los Angeles where he has devel-
oped independently a small private
school for religious counselors and
depth psychologists.

Extension Course
In Typing Opened
Opening class of a new Univer-
sity Extension course in typewrit-
ing will be held at 7 p.m. today
in Rm. 276, Business Administra-
tion Bldg.
Registration for the course,
which deals with the basic prin-
ciples of touch typing, is $5.00.

3&
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