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April 01, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-04-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UESIDAYT APRT1, 1950

permanent record. They felt it was
not a conference function to en-
dorse a candidate. However, sev-
eral delegates attacked this posi-
tion on grounds that the Party
must take some stand eventually,
and Young Republicans should ex-
press themselves now.
DAVE CARGO, Grad., former
YR president and now head of the
campus Eisenhower group last
night thought the platform was
"conceived and concocted with
typical reactionary, Taftonian buf-
foonery and asininity. In other
words, it just plain stunk."
Walt Hanson, '53L, an offi-
cer in the "Ike" club remarked
"this convention should have
taken place in the heart of the
bourbon sections of the South.
The delegates have completey
forgotten their heritage of civil
rights."
However, Ned Simon, '53, vice-
president of the local YR, Club and
chairman of Michigan's delegation
to the conference refuted these
comments last night. "It's high
time that the Republican Party
abandoned those principles of me-
tooism which have characterized it
in losing the last five Presidential
elections," he said.
"This convention of honest and
progressive Young Republicans
has adopted a platform of which
all Americans should be proud,"
he concluded.
Incident Caused
By MSC Student
DETROIT --P)-- A reckless
driving case involving a 20-year-
old Michigan State College stu-
dent turned into an international
incident yesterday.
Fred W. Crew, Jr., of Detroit,
the student, was given a day in
jail and put on probation for a
year for driving at 70 miles an
hour.
Among those present at a con-
ference with Traffic Judge John
Watts was the Deputy Policel
Chief of Riverside, Ont., Bryce
Monaghan.
Crew said that prior to his ar-
rest early Saturday he had been
sold beer at the Riverside Yacht
Club without being asked his age.
Afterwards, Monaghan said he
would take the matter up with the
Ontario Liquor Control Board. He
hinted at prosecution.
"We view drinking by juveniles
justas seriously-as you do on this
side of the river," he said.

-Daily-Matty Kessler
SPANISH PLAY-Carlos Soares and Ana Maria Kowdas, A&D,
rehearse a scene from "La Sirena Varada" sponsored by the
Sociedad Hispanica. The play features an all-faculty cast, with
the exception of the one female role.
r* * *
Faculty To Display.Dramatic
Flair In Spanish Tragi-co'medy

Wilson Sees
Steel Strike
As Setback
(Continued from Page 1)
thority, have indicated previously
they might leave in June or July.
IN OTHER developments:
1. Industry-union wage talks
scheduled to have begun in New
York yesterday afternoon were
postponed until today. An indus-
try spokesman said without elab-
oration that it was a temporary
postponement, "pending further
developments."
2. The government, it was learn-
ed, is preparing to channel all
steel into the defense program if
a strike talpes place.
3. Presidential Secretary Joseph
Short was asked whether Truman
is looking for a regular successor
to Wilson, or whether presidential
assistant John R. Steelman would
take over the job permanently.
Short replied by saying he had
announced yesterday that Steel-
man was taking over temporarily.
4. Sen. Capehart (R-Ind.) press-
ed for a congressional investiga-
tion of the Wilson-wage board
disagreement. However, Sen. May-
Bank (D-S.C.). opposed any such
move now even though he didn't
like the way the administration
had handled things.
SL Campus
Elections Start
(Continued from Page 1)
dependent candidates. The group
has offered a fifteen dollar prize
to each independent house with
100 per cent voting record.
TAKING advantage of the all-
campus voting spirit, the architec-
ture school will hold private elec-
tions in the lobby of their build-
ing. Candidates for senior class
president and for the class of '52
is William Werner. Candidates for
vice-president are Dave Leslie and
Joseph Kendra.
Running for secretary is William
Gould, and for treasurer are Earl
Van Allsburg and Richard Stuck-
man.
The '53 senior class candidates
are president: Arden Pryce, Don-
ald Weir, Sam Deyo, and Jack
Flynn; vice-president: William
Kilgore, James Wilson and Joyce
Lallier; secretary: Donna Mayer;
treasurer: Terry Matheson, Fred
Pitman, and Richard Newton.
The architecture school with its
five year program has two senior
classes.

By ALICE BOGDONOFF
Arts Theater Club actress, Y.
Jo Willoughby, has no trouble
playing the inefficient dental
assistant, "Cleo", in the Club's
current play "Rocket to the Moon".
Miss Willoughby was herself
once a very inefficient dental
assistant. In order to finance a
trip to England the talented young
actress worked for a New York
dentist two years ago.
But the dentist decided Miss
Willoughby was not particularly
suited for the job when he found
her boiling eggs and coffee in the
sterilizer. So she abondoned her
dental assistant career and left
for London and the Royal Acad-
emy of Dramatic Arts to which
she had been awarded a scholar-
ship.
BEFORE STUDYING in Lon-
don, Miss Willoughby had toured
with the USO in Iwo Jima and
other Pacific islands during the'
war.
Later, joining with an Eng-
lish company, Miss Willoughby'
played to audiences in Germany
and Austria. The actress pointed
out that "the Germans take
their theatre more seriously
than the Americans g- is it a
way of life with them."
She praised the English and
European setup in which the
theatre is decentralized so that
each town supports its own act-
ing group. Lauding England as
"the greatest of them all" she ex-
plained that the Royal Academy
places young actors in companies
-something which never happens
here."
"England was wonderful", she
Wash tenaw
OK's Williams
At Convention
(Continued from Page 1)
tary of State Dean Acheson for
signal praise, and'commending
President Truman's removal of
Gen. Douglas MacArthur.
On the national scene, it.called
for a Fair Employment Practices
Act and condemned the , Taft
Hartley Law, demanding instead
a new labor code.
A NEW COUNTY courthouse
was also recommended to replace
the "present antiquated structure."
Reporting for the Finance Com-
mittee, Prof. John P. Dawson of
the Law School predicted a fierce
campaign ahead "in fact robably
the hottest since Lincoln's second
election."

*

new to them and they are looking
for new things."
* * *
HAVING TOURED all over this
country, Miss Willoughby noted
that city theatre usually takes the
form of "amateurish" civic groups
which are often haunted by dis-
illusioned actors.
"There is a movement towards
something like the Arts Theater
Club," the actress feels. Pointing
to the nationwide desire for pro-
fessional theatres. Miss Willough-
by said her company was "treated
as royalty" everywhere they
toured.
"If you're still wondering", Miss
Willoughby concluded "the "Y"
in my name could stand for any-
thing from Ycanda to Yvonne."
Student Injured
As Car Hits Tree
A University graduate student,
Mary Ann Mitteer, suffered a cut
nose when her car rammed a tree
at W. Washington and S. Revena
Blvd. at 6:30 p.m. Sunday.
Driving on a temporary learn-
er's permit, Miss Mitteer lost con-
trol while making a sharp turn.
She was taken to University
Health Service.

'GREATEST OF ALL':
Actress Lauds English Theatre

SL Thwarts
Candidates'
NightVigil
Two candidates for J-hop com-
mittee yesterday moved their beds,
umbrellas, radio--and 'publicity
material-in front of Angell Hall
for an all night stand.
Despite promises that "we won't
leave until the campus wakes up
and elects us", the hopefuls' cam-
paigning was short lived. After a
few hour's stay, they were evicted
from their sidewalk home by SL
Elections' Committee members.
Mike McNerney, '53 explained
that the copmittee felt the
stunt was a violation of an elec-
tion rule which prohibits affix-
ing campaign literature to U'
property.
He added, "It's not that we ob-
jected just to this particular stunt;
there's no telling how far things
like this could go." He expressed
fear that, if campaigning began
to clutter up the campus, it might
lead to a University ruling which
would eliminate even voting
booths from University property.
However, the evicted campaign-
ers rationalized that, if their plan
had not been dampened by SL, it
would have been by the rain.

Y. JO WILLOUGHBY
exclaimed, "but my fellow students
insisted that my southern drawl
(she was born in Texas) and
Shakespeare just don't mix."
Speaking seriously of Shake-
speare, Miss Willoughby claimed
that "the English students I
worked with read Shakespeare
beautifully but their acting of his
plays lacks life and vigor." "Amer-
ican actors are able to capture'
this life because Shakespeare is

ti
4

\IIJ

By JOYCE FICKIES
Students will have an oppor-
tunity to observe the dramatic
skill of their language instructors
as the curtain raises on the Span-
ish play, "La Sirena Varada," at
8 p.m. today in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
This year the play, sponsored by
the Sociedad Hispanica as part
of the Hispanic Pagaent, will fea-
ture an all-faculty cast. The
greasepainted teacher-actors of
the romance language department
include: Carlos A. Soares, Joseph
Plasonja, Rafael Marti-Abello,
Prof. E. A. Mercado, J. V. Falcon-
ieri, Charles Fossati and Anthony
Pasquariello. Pasquariello will also
direct the play.,
* * *
"LA SIRENA VARADA" was
Aircraft Firm
To Transfer
To Willow Run
The Chase Aircraft Co. of Tren-
ton, N. J., will move all its equip-
ment-including 1,000 employes -
to Willow Run within several
months, it was announced yester-
day by the Kaiser-Frazer Corp.
Kaiser-Frazer has contracts to
produce the Chase designed C-123
"Avitruck," an assault transport
plane, for the Air Force. Produc-
tion is scheduled to begin late this
year.
The moving of 1,000 new fam-
ilies into the already jammed Wil-
low Run area in addition to the
probability that the K-F produc-
tion staff twill be increased before
the end of the year, points to a
growing Washtenaw County hous-
ing problem, according to city
officials.

written by Alejandro Casona, a
Spanish-born playwright. He was
exiled from Spain in 1936 for anti-
Franco sympathies and now lives
in Argentina. This is the first per-
formance of his play in the United
States.
Casona's main theme is the con-
flict: what is reality? He carries
this theme throughout 'Sirena.'
The play concerns a wealthy,
disillusioned young man who
buys a haunted house, complete
with ghost, in an effort to set up
a refuge for those who wish to
escape the logic and reason of
the world. He is joined, first, by
an artist who bandages his eyes
because he is tired of the colors
which already exist and wants
to imagine new ones, and a self-
styled mermaid who urges him
to come away with her to the
bottom of the sea.
The tragic-comic course of
events leads up to the hectic cli-
max where the characters learn
to'face facts and accept the world
as it is.,
A matinee will be given at 3:15
p.m. tomorrow. Reserved seg.ts for
the play may be obtained from
2:00 p.m. to 8 p.m. today and from
noon to 3:15 p.m. tomorrow at the
Lydia Mendelssohn box office. All
tickets are 65 cents.

Fordrworthvered
eWHICH
THOU DOST REFRESH
THY THIRSTY LIPS
The Exursrn
With which? Why, with+
of course, for this delicio
refreshment is the answe
Have a Coke.
BOMLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPA
ANN ARBOR COCA-COLA BOTTLiN
C
"Coke" is a rosterod irod-mark. (C 1952, THE COCA-COL

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r to thirst.

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