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March 29, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MA'

Z''

'House Told

Hatcher Tells of Teachers' Faults

* *

-uauy-uon uampoe
'U' PRESIDENT SPEAKS-President Harlan Hatcher opens the
final session of the Forum On College and University Teaching. .
On his left are panel members Prof. Algo Henderson, chairman of
the forum, and Prdf. Helen Peak of the psychology department.

psychology department and Dean
Ralph A. Sawyer, of the graduate
school.
THE PANEL discussed the ad-
vantages of a general education
as opposed to a vocational educa-
tion, and the possibility of com-
bining them as objectives of a
course.
Prof. Haber defended the
stand that a liberal arts educa-
tion is the only foundation of
an education, while Prof. Hen-
derson advocated an integrated
system of both general and
vocational education.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

- Fda' '
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4 1&

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..

ENDS TONIGHT
"ROOM FOR ONE MORE"
and
"RED BADGE OF COURAGE"
STARTS SUNDAY
THRU TUESDAY

The discussion continued on the
question of whether a professor
should insert personal opinions
into a course or remain complete-
ly impartial.
"A professor deceives himself,"
Prof. Wernette said, "if he thinks
he is not presenting opinions."
But, he concluded, in fairness
to his students he must express
the other side of the question, too.
2,200 People
Expected Here
For Meetings
More than 2,200 persons from
Michigan and Ohio will be in Ann
Arbor this week to attend a series
of meetings being held here.
Largest gathering will be the
thirteenth annual foremen's con-
ference April 4 and 5. Some 500
persons from metropolitan Detroit
will participate the first day, with
500 different foremen from Michi-
gan and Ohio coming the follow-
ing day for a repeat of the con-
ference.
A total of 650 high school stu-
dents is expected April 1 and 2
for the annual Spanish fiesta de-
signed to acquaint them with
Spanish life and customs.
The fourth annual cost confer-
ence, April 5, will draw approxi-
mately 500 accountants and about
70 persons are expected for a
training institute for summer
recreation leaders in smaller com-
munities, April 3 and 4.
G & S Society Will
Be Heard on Radio
Songs from the forthcoming
Gilbert and Sullivan Society's pro-
duction of "Princess Ida" will be
featured on the "Michigan Inside
Out" show at 5:30 p.m. today on
station WHRV.
In addition to the preview by
members of the cast, singer Patty
Joy will do a few numbers in her
"Betty Hutton style."
Emcees Mickey Sager, '52, and
Bernie Kahn, Grad., urged stu-
dents to send names of talented
entertainers to Michigan Inside
Out, WHRV.

House Told
Of Russian
A ir Threat
WASHINGTON -(A - Russia's
expanding force of long-range
atom bombers is "the most omi-
nous threat this country has ever
known," U. S. Air Force leaders
told Congress in testimony made
public last night.
They also said Soviet jet plane
production has been four times
greater than that of the United
States.
* * *
AIR SECRETARY Thomas Fin-
letter, chief of staff Gen. Hoyt
Vandenberg and other USAF
leaders presented this grim picture
to a House appropriations sub-
committee. They were seeking to
justify the budget request for 20
billion dollars for the Air Force
in the next fiscal year. Some
legislators have threatened to cut
the figure.
Although the officials con-
ceded Russia had a long lead
numerically, especially in jet
fighters, they insisted the
quality of American planes is
better.
They gave their testimony to a
committee some of whose members
were sharply critical of the Amer-
ican plane production effort. One
of them, Rep. Scrivner (R.-Kan.)
asked:
"Where are we now? Are we
Tyros, or are we the productive
genius that we thought we were?
Is Russia such a backward nation
if it can do these things? Where
did they get this business and
production genius in the last
five or six years?"
* * *
HERE ARE SOME of the things
the committee was told:
1-Vandenberg - "If the (Rus-
sian) program continues as pre-
dicted, within three years most
of the Soviet Air Force will be
jet-powered. By this date, more-
over, their total number of long-
range aircraft capable of carry-
ing atomic bombs will b.egin to
approach ours."
2-Undersecretary R. L. Gil-
patric - the United States is
only even, not ahead of Russia
in jet engines. "We have got to
do all we can to keep up with
them."
3-Finletter - In Korea "we
have an object lesson which should
teach us not to be too complacent
about the quality of our machines,
and that is the excellent quality of
the MIG-15," the Soviet-made
fighter battling U. S. F-86 Sabres.
STravel Sign-up
Boxes Posted
Sign-up boxes for the Union
travel service are now available
in the Law Quad and Medical
and Dental Schools, Steve Fuerth,
'54, staffman in charge, announced
yesterday.
These stations are in addition to
the boxes in the East Quad and
the Union. Fuerth said drivers
were especially needed for Chi-
cago, Boston and New York, while
riders were needed for trips to
Seattle.
Fuerth also urged students wish-
ing rides to Florida because the
Vulcan trip was cancelled to con-

tact. the travel service. The Union
will be open until April 4 for those
who wish to sign up.
Postpone Serkin
Concert Till April
The final concert in the Choral
Union series formerly scheduled
for Monday has been postponed
until Tuesday, April 22, Charles
A. Sink, chairman of the Univer-
sity Musical Society, announced
yesterday.
Pianist Rudolf Serkin, who was
slated to present the concert, suf-
fered burns on his hands when a
box of matches exploded at an
informal birthday party in his
home. He will be the featured per-
former in the April 22 concert.

ACP Poll Finds College
Students Like Ike. 2-1
Michigan students are not the only ones who favor Eisenhower
in a presidential poll.
The NATO general came out two to one ahead of his nearest
opponent in a national poll of college students conducted recently
by the Associated Collegiate Press.
* * * *
A DAILY POLL taken here in February showed Eisenhower to be
a three to one favorite among University students.
The ACP pollers listed 10 candidates and asked students to
vote for one. Eisenhower polled 30 per cent of the votes,'with his
nearest opponent, Gov. Earl Warren, of California, chalking up
17 per cent of the tally.
Stassen and Taft tied with 10 percent, and Truman lagged behind
with only 7 per cent of the students favoring him for re-election.
Sen. Kefauver got 4 per cent of the total, trailing behind MacArthur
by 2 per cent. Sen. Douglas, Paul Hoffman and Justice Vinson all
received small percentages.
Only one per cent polled offered no opinion.
EISENHOWER'S STRENGTH was most apparent in the East
and Southwest, according to the ACP. Warren ran the five-star
soldier a close second in California and the Far West.
Given a choice between Taft and Truman, 46 per cent of the
students spoke for Taft, 29 per cent OK'd Truman and 25 per
cent refused to give an opinion.
The President fell farther behind when an Ike-Truman choice
was set up. Eisenhower got 71 per cent of the tallies, Truman only
16 per cent. Thirteen per cent had no opinion in this race.
[ IDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

~ ~ ~magazines
'~describe it as
La z ""IL"TEMOST
COLOSSAL
"& MO VIE EVER
xXII MADE l,
M-G-M
IIv lU
proudlypresents
Three
V.IA r. Great
g -
COLOR BY
{ O IN LOR

The Daily Official Bulletin is in
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11
a.m. on Saturday).
SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 1952
VOL. LXH, No. 126
Notices
Distribution of Printed Matter: No
handbills or other printed matter shall
be distributed on the campus, in Uni-
versity Buildings, or in front of Uni-
versity buildings by students or student
organizations. The area officially con-
sidered the campus includes all Uni-
versity buildings and the property on
which they are situated.
Handbills, signs, and printed matter
not inconsistent with good taste may
be posted on the bulletin boards in
University buildings but not elsewhere.
Posters or signs advertising student-
sponsored activities or social functions
may also be posted in the area in front
of the University Library but only after
obtaining specific permission from the
Dean of Students.
Automobile Regulations will be lifted
from 5:00 p.m. Friday, April 4, to 8:00
a.m. Monday, April 14.
Mr. David S. Dodge, of the Arabian
American Oil Co., will be here on Mon-
day, March 31, and Tuesday, April 1,
to interview unmarried men interested
in government relations work for the
Company in Saudi Arabia. Students in-
terested should make an appointment
through Mr. Vokac, Bureau of Appoint-
ments, Administration Building, Room
35?8, or through a faculty teacher of
Near Eastern Studies.
Near East College Association
The American Director of the Near
East College Association, Dr. Robert
S. Hardy, will be in Ann Arbor Monday
and Tuesday, March 31 and April 1, to
interview candidates for teaching po-
sitions at the Near East Colleges in
Beirut, Istanbul, and Greece. Interested
graduate students may make appoint-
ments by calling the Department of
Near Eastern Studies, Ext. 2235.
Applications for Fulbright Awards for
University lecturing and advanced re-
search in the East Asia and the Pacific
competition for the 1953-54 Academic
Year, which are open to postdoctoral
students and faculty, are due April 15.
This is also the deadline for applica-
tion for special interim programs for
Denmark, Iraq, Pakistan, and Japan.
Applications must be made to the
Conference Board of Associated Re-
search Councils, Committee on Inter-
national Exchange of Persons, 201 Con-
stitution Avenue, Washington 25, D.C.,
but information on the opportunities
and conditions can be obtained at the
office of the Graduate School.
Academic Notices
Seminar in Complex Variables: Mon-
day, March 31, at 3 p.m., in Room 247
W.E. Miss Heater will continue the dis-
cussion on "Fabry's Theorems."
Events Today
School of Music Student Council:
1 p.m., room 406 BMT.
Faculty Sports Night. IM Building,
7:30-10 p.m. All facilities will be avail-
able. Children will not be admitted un-
less accompanied by their parents.
For further information telephone
Mrs. Dixon, 25-8475.
Inter-Arts Union: Meeting at 2:30 in
League.

Canterbury Club: Evening Prayer at
5:15 in the Chapel.
Lane Hall Open House, 9,00-12:00. So-
cial dancing, square dancing and
games.
All Campus Dance and Mixer: Spon-
sored by the Student Religious Associa-
tion from 9 to 12 p.m at Lane Hall. So-
cial and square dancing plus other en-
tertainment. All students invited. No
admission charge.
Saturday Luncheon Discussion Group,
Lane Hall, 12:15 p.m. Rev. Chester Lo-
ucks will discuss "Symbols of the Eas-
ter Season."
S.R.A. Council Saturday afternoon
get-together, 2:00-6:00 p.m. All Council
members and other primary group re-
presentatives expected. Meet at Lane
Hall to go to the Baldwin's.
Coming Events
Volunteer Naval Research Reserve
Unit 9-3, 7:30 p.m., Monday, March 31,
in Room 2082, Natural Science Bldg.
Speaker: Dr. James French. Subject:
Legal Medicine.
Kappa Kappa Psi meeting on Monday,
March 31, 9:00 p.m. Harris Hall. All
members should be present.
Barnaby Club: Supper and discussion
meeting at Lane Hall, Mon., March 31,
at 6 p.m. Phone 5838 for reservations
before 10 p.m. Saturday.
Graduate Outing Club: Meet at the
rear of the Rackham Building, 2 p.m.
Sunday, March 30.
Communion Breakfast Sun., March
30, after 9:30 Mass. Speaker: Monsignor
Hardy, who will talk on "Our Lady of
Fatima." Tickets on sale in Chapel Of-
fice or, after Sunday Masses. Get your
ticket now, because space is limited.
Concerts
The Rudolph Serkin concert originally
scheduled for Mon., March 31 has been
postponed until Tues., April 22.

CLASSIFIELDS
MEALS-1 block from campus, frater-
MICHIGAN DAILY 1P083. ilM
Phone23-24P-MTHE best cosmetics are "BEAUTY
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M. COUNSELORS." Try them. Men's
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING and women's."Phone 2-5152. )5M
RATES PERSONAL
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS I DIDN'T KNOW until my roommate
2 .60 1.34 1.96 told me that the best place to find
3 .70 1.78 2.84 terrific bargains is in The Daily's
4 .90 2.24 3.92 value-packed Want-Ads! I Know
Figure 5 average words to a line. now! I always read them! )19P
Classified deadline daily except AT LAST
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays Laundry service you wanted. 7 lbs.
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue. for 56c. 1 day service. U. & M. Dry
Cleaners. 1306 S. Univ. , )12P
LOST AND FOUNDBSERVICES
BLACK ENGLISH Girl's Bike, Schwinn BUSINESS
model, meta basket. 5974. )34L PERSONALIZED TYPING. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Ph. 3-0254. 315 E. Lib-
LOST-Gold bracelet with rhinestone erty (side door). )4B
flower design. Call 2-3225, Mary Jo
Jones. .)35L WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
FOR SALE Also'ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )6B
Your Official UNIVERSITY OF-
MICHIGAI RING is waiting TYPEWRITER & Fountain Pen repair
for you - NOW - at work a specialty. Typewriters, Adding
Burr Patt's, 1209 S. Univ. )58 Machines and W /C Tape and Wire
Recorders. Morrill's 314 S. State St.
GABARDINE PANTS $5.49-$7.50 value. )9B
Colors: brown, blue, green, grey-ad-
vertised in Le S re, 1y E. TYPING-Reasonable Rates. Accurate
WASH. Ph. 3-8611. )50 & Efficient. Phone 7590. 830 So. Main.
)1B
SUITS, jackets, top coats, 36 and 36
long. Bargains. Phone 3-0254. 315 E. TYPING-IBM Electromatic; Thesis and
Liberty (side door). )63 technical experience, stenography, Ph.
8587. )10B
SELMAR, CLARINET. Excellent condi-
tion. Very reasonable. 6410 Scott Hse., RENTAL TYPEWRITERS-Repairs on
S.Q. )67 all makes. Office Equipment Co. 215
E. Liberty. Ph. 2-1213. )5B
CUSHMAN SCOOTER-A-1 condition.
Windshield and extras. 2-1349. )68 FOR RENT
FOR SALE-Cushman motor scooter, APT. HUNTING? - Try Apt. Finding
good condition. Call 2-4250 after 6:00 Service at the Campus Tourist Home.
for further information. )64 Rooms Dy day or week. Kitcen Priv.
518 E. William St., 3-8454. )5R
INDIA MOTORCYCLE SALES-Author-
ized B.S.A. and Sunbeam Dealer. 207 BRAND NEW 3-room modernistic fur-
W. Liberty. Phone 2-1748. )33 nished apartment between Ypsi. and
Ann Arbor. Gas heat, electric stove
MISCELLANEOUS aid refrigerator. Private entrance.
No children. $95 a month. Phone
SPECIAL-on Poodle Permanents, com- 2-9020. )14F
plete - $5.00. Modern Beauty Shop,
117 S. Main, Ph. 8100. )20M TRANSPORTATION
SHIRTS LAUNDERED-18c each., 1 day GET HOME the cheap way. Advertise
service, no extra charge. U. & M. Dry for a ride )9T
Cleaners. 1306 S. Univ. )23M WANTED - Ride to Aspen, Oolorado,
APPLICATION PHOTOS-3 day service. Spring Vacation. Call Fred Wiedle,
Wed. and Sat. hours 10-4. Palmer 2-5644. )12T
Studio, Michigan Theater Building. WANTED - Passengers to Florida or
)21M points South. Leaving Thursday.
Phone 2-5180. )1T
USE OUR 'little' ads for 'Big' results. OOMS2 FOR RENT
Far-fetched? No-there's humor, in- ROOMS FOR RENT
terest, excitement, and Big news in FOR MALE STUDENTS-One single, one
the little ads you find in the classi- double. 1 bk. from Law Club. 808
fled section of the Daily. )27MA Oakland. )2R
Mand
CINFMA GUil) the
STUDENT
PLAYERS
present
"THE BAKER'S WIFE"
STARRING
RAIM U
"Scandalously funny . . . a true comedy ..
-N. Y. Times
"The lustiest, bawdiest, most compassionate
comedy ever screened," -Harper's Bazaar
ARCH. AUD. 50c (tax mcl.)
Fri. & Sat., March 28 & 29 7:30-9:30

I

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NOW PLAYING-
ODETS'
ROCKET TO
THE MOON
Arts Theater

StoArts
TODAY!

M C IGRAI

44c today until 5 P.M.
Continuous from 1 P.M.

-

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An Intimate Theatre
Bringing Cinema Triumphs
From All Notions

HELD OVER THROUGH SUNDAY
Th funniest picture that ever crossed the "Big Drink!"
..ARTHUR RANK
t. ~~presents ~(B
\ASIL RADFORD
JOAN GREENWOOD'
LITTLE USLAND~
A VNIYESAL-INTERNA]IOAI ELEASE vv

2*_
..

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M-G-M PRESENTS "QUO VADIS" STARRING
ROBERT TAYLOR * DEBORAH KERR e LEO
GENN AND PETER USTINOV + SCREEN PLAY
BY JOHN LEE MAHIN AND S. N. BEHRMAN,
SONYA LEVIEN " BASED ON THE NOVEL
BY HENRYK SIENKIEWICZ - DIRECTED BY
MERVYN LeROY " PRODUCED BY SAM
ZIMBALIST * AN M-G-M PICTURE

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Miniatures
Mister Bugs Bunny
in "Rabbit of Seville"

"Ski In The Sky"
Sport Subject

I

i-' A PULITZER PRIZE PLAY
DEPARTMENT"OF SPEECH PRESENTS
Robert E. Sherwood's

THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY IN ANN ARBOR
presents
its
NATIONAL PRESIDENT
JAMES S. PERKINS
in a public lecture
"MAN'SORIGINS
A N U A "".

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