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March 28, 1952 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-28

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FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 1952

AE ixI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'&,rAXmT'Wr 4-h" Om A JWT MOOTAT TV? A'%7 T(i

Engieerig
Council Sets
New Policy*
By BOB APPLE
In an effort to improve the in-
ternal student conditions of the
engineering college the Engineer-
ing Honor Council launched a
four-point program this week.
The first point in the program
is the changing of the, method of
reporting cheating during exami-
nations. It is a standing policy
that after passing out the exam
the instructor leaves the room.
IN THE PAST it had been the
practice that when a person
noticed cribbing during an exam
he wouldstand up and warn the
class about it. This was done with
the hope that although no names
would be mentioned, the warning
would be sufficient enough to
stop the, cheating from continu-
ing. The Honor Council feels how-
ever, that the system did not
work well because many students
are ambarassed to stand up in
class to report cheating.
Therefore, a new practice has
been inaugurated wherebyin-
stead of a student standing up
to warn the class, cribbing is
now exposed by tapping a pencil.
The second point in the program
is the adding of a new rule to the
honor system's regulations. It
states that all figuring and calcu-
lations done on scratch paper dur-
ing an exam period must be hand-
ed in along with the test. The
purpose of the rule is to help stu-
dents receive full credit for their
answers. Because the instructors
will not give any credit for answers
unless the scratch work is shown,
the Council feels it is affording
students all advantages ,possible
in having them turn in their notes.
The third issue is the plan for
the Council to participate in the
University's orientation program
at the beginning of each semester.
Nick Radell, '52 E, president of the
Council, explained that by doing
this they would be more able to
benefit freshmen and transfer
students entering the engineering
school.
In conjunction with this activ-
ity, Radell said, -the Council plans
to send booklets and letters ex-
piaining the honor system to all
these new students before they
enter the school.
The last point is the taking over
of the Councils financial responsi-'
bilities by the Vulcan Engineering
Honor Society. Originally they
were held by the Engineering
Council.

Whitman Expert Here

MINY YI UJAUrLI Ifm L.WAY:
CoedUnion Faces Space Difficulties

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sec-
ond in a series of articles designed to
acquaint students with the arguments
for a co-educational union and the
obstacles to be faced. Today: the
obstacles.)
By CAL SAMRA
and ERIC VETTER7
Ideally, perhaps many students
would agree that a co-educational
union would be a welcome im-
provement, butinvariably some
cold, hard facts have to be faced.
Essentially, the most striking
obstacle to be surmounted is a
physical one.
UNION OFFICIALS contend
that the building is presently not
large or adequate enough in facili-
ties to accommodate an influx of
coeds. Such facilities as the lounge
and the cafeteria are too small,
they insist.
While other facilities such as
the swimming pool and the
game rooms would have to be
revamped to permit coed use.
Even if and when the contem-
plated Union wing is built, it is
argued that the building would
still be incapable of harbouring
coed activities. The new addition,
by and large, is designed to provide
additional men's facilities in the
face of an unexpected upshot in
enrollment.
In order to successfully handle
all coed activities, an even larger
wing would have to be construct-
ed, in addition to interior re-
modeling. This is virtually impos-
sible because of the limited space
in which the Union can expand,
according to Union officials.
THE SECOND obstacle has been
termed a "psychological problem."
Evidently, opening the gates to
swarms of coeds would be a sharp
blow to a number of people.
For one, a large body of alum-
ni who have contributed money
to the Union wouldn't cherish
the idea. "You've got to remem-
ber," one official pointed out,
"that they still regard the Union

as a traditional haven for get-
togethers."
Strangely enough, another psy-
chological barrier has been erected
by a goodly number of men stu-
dents who regard the Union as a
male sanctuary where "you can re-
flect soberly, discuss politics,
study, eat, or shoot a game of pool
without being harassed by wom-
en."
WHENEVER Union or League
officials are confronted with the
question of a co-educational union,
the inevitable retort is: "What
will you do with the League?"--
which poses the third major prob-
lem.
It is the general feeling that if
the Union were thrown open to
coeds now, the League would
suffer. Or, if both the Union and

League were decreed co-educa-
tional, the two institutions
would be forced into competition
with each other.
League officials, who are not
particularly receptive to either
idea, reiterated the arguments of
Union officials. Similarly, they too
would face probable alumni op-
position as well as reaction from
satisfied coeds.
According to Cathy S otir,
League president, the League now
handles over 100 women's activi-
ties, which the Union would not be
able to accommodate.
"At present," Miss Sotir added,
"the Union and the League area
fulfilling their respective functions
as well as any coeducational union
in the country."
(Next: THE NEW WING)

SENIORS
* Commencement
Announcements
* Booklets
Personal Cards
GO ON SALE NEXT WEEK

" E V E R Y T H I N G K N O W N

I N M U S IC"

-. in Ann Arbor
508 E. William

-Daily-Matty Kessler

* * * *

SPEAKING to a large audience of
Walt Whitman enthusiasts last
night at the English Journal Club,
Charles Feinberg, noted book col-
lector, discussed the important in-
fluence the poet's friends had upon
his life.
His friends included such not-
ables as Emerson, Thoreau, Swyn-
burne, and Tennyson. Most of
these friendships lasted even after
his death, Feinberg noted.
Feinberg pointed out that when
Whitman desired a "steady job"
to increase his meager income, he
was refused a government post.
The author of "The Leaves of
Grass" was not considered a "good
risk." Even Emerson would not
help him.
"Of his love life, very little is
known," the expert said. After his
death, his friends hurried tohis

private notebooks to find possible
traces of a love interest. Entries
"To Netty" aroused great excite-
ment, but greater investigations
proved the find a failure. Netty
was his horse.
Including specimens from his
"modest" colection of many rare
first editions and original manu-
scripts, Feinberg delighted his
listeners by reading from them.
Feinberg, father of Univer-
sity student, Judith Feinberg Pick,
'53, also has manuscripts from his
collection on display at the Gen-
eral Library.
Records Needed
Both classical and popular rec-
ords are needed by Lane Hall for
the Fresh Air Camp record drive
it is currently sponsoring.

"All work & no
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..
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* *
THE ENGINEERING Honor
Council itself is an eight-man
board established to eliminate
cheating in engineering school
and hold hearings for all persons
accused of doing it.
If cheating continues after a
student has informed a class of
its presence, the proper proce-
dure is for that person to report
the student he thinks is cheat.
ing by including a note to th
instructor along with his test.
The instructor then forwards
the information to the Honor
Council.
The Council in turn holds a
hearing with the accused and his
accuser. If the Council, upon hear-
ing the case, feels that disciplin-
ary action should be taken, they
forward the matter and the re-
commended action to a faculty
committee for final approval.
Radell stressed that many stu-
dents are reluctant to turn in crib-
bers for fear they will cause the
cheaters to be expelled from
school. He explained that it is the
exception rather than the rule
that a convieted cribber is expelled.
"In conclusion," he pointed out,
"the Council realizes the honor
system is not perfect, but, with the
cooperation of all involved, we
think present conditions in the en-
gineering school can be bettered."

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300 South Thayer Phone 2-2500
Just West of Hill Auditorium

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stock of FIRE HOUSE FIVE
plus TWO records" avail-
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Popular Record Department
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*Get them while they're hot

(POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)
THE TAXES AE CMING!
4 N
- -- . - ,..
3~
;. *t,'.--
k-47
PEOPLE OF ANN ARBOR
YOU ARE NOW PAYING A 20% FEDERAL TAX
FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT
DO YOU WANT TO PAY MORE?
The City Council has placed a Charter Amendment on the ballot at the April 7th election, seeking the power to
place a City tax (amount not stated) on motion picture theatres, athletic events, plays, dances, musical pro-
grams and all public events where an admission is charged.
It Is a discriminatory tax in that it is aimed at the amusement industry only. Already burdened with a 20%
federal tax that the public pays, the proposal will add another City tax on top of this that will fall on the average
man and his family.
It is an unfair tax ... another consumer tax that YOU WILL PAY. It places on one group, particularly people
in the lower and middle income brackets, an additional tax burden.

-f I

I5

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Philadelphia Orchestra - Eugene Ormandy
Sonatas for Violin and Piano, Nos. 3 & 4 (Beethoven)
Zino Francescatti & Robert Casadesus
Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, K.581 (Mozart)
B. Goodman & American Arts Quartet
Polka and Fugue from Schwanda (Weinberger)
Dance of Seven Veils (Strauss)
Philadelphia Orchestra - Eugene Ormandy
Songs by Debussy, Poulenc, Chabrier, Satie
Pierre Betnac & Francois Poulenc
Increase Your Enjoyment of the May Festival with
DAMNATION OF FAUST - Complete (Berlioz)
PARIS SOLOISTS, CHORUS, ORCHESTRA - FOURNET

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TAXES ARE NECESSARY, OF COURSE, TO MAINTAIN GOVERNMENT,
BUT THERE IS A LIMIT TO THE TAX BURDEN PEOPLE CAN STAND.
- _ -. -. ~--m rA -T T7" - 1

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