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March 23, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-23

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 23, 1930

i

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MARCh ~3. 1R5~
U ______________________________________________________ I

C

.SYNCHROTRON FINALLY WORKS:

Scientific Racetrack Cracks Atoms

BY BOB APPLE
Hialeah and Santa Anita have nothing on the University's "atomic
race track".
In fact it's a pretty sure bet that running speeds on the former will
never approach the whizzing electron projectiles, whirling around the
"atomic racetrack". Technically called a synchrotron, the University
invention is an electric device used to crack atoms.
* * * *
After seven years of research and trial models, the synchrotron
whirled into action last week for the first time. University scientists

Campus
Calendar
Events Today
BACH CONCERT--The second
of two Sunday afternoon public
concerts of works by Bach will
be presented by Robert Noehren,
University Organist,* at 4:15 p.m.
today in Hill Auditorium.
* * *
UNITARIAN MEETING-Prof.
Wesley Maurer of the Department
of Journalism will speak on "The
Responsibility of the Press for
Civil Liberties" at 7 p.m. today at
a meeting of the Unitarian Stu-
dent Group in the Upper Room
of Lane Hall.
After -the address, a discussion
will be held to determine the
group's policy in regard to the
Student Religious Association's
action on the Lecture Committee.
* * *
Events Tomorrow
LECTURE--A public lecture
on "Bach's 'St. Matthew Pas-
sion"' by Hans David of the
music school will be given at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre. The talk is
in anticipation of the first Ann
Arbor performance of the work
at 8 p.m. Friday in Hill Audi-
torium.
Coming Events
BIRD STUDY-An organiza-
tional meeting for the eight-week
extension course in bird study will
be held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Rm. 2116 Natural Science. A regis-
tration fee of $5.00, may be paid
before the meeting begins.
* * *
BEACON LECTURE-An ad-
dress on "Great Britain, Her Policy
Today," will be presented by the
British Consul General of De-
troit, W. N. Storey, at 8 p.m.
Thursday in the Union. It is spon-
sored by the British Empire and
Commonwealth of Nations Asso-
ciation.

'had to iron out difficulties in one
small part, before it would work.
correctly. Altogether, three models
of this part were tried in the
machine, before the final one set
it in motion.
The machine is referred to as
a racetrack because the elec-
tron projectiles go around in a
path made up of curves and
straightaways like the versions
with pari-mutuel windows. The
electrons are then shot info an
atom whereupon the atom
cracks.
Designed by Prof. H. R. Crane
and Prof. D. M. Dennison of the
Physics Department, the synchro-
tron was built in 1946 under a
navy contract. In 1950 it was taken
over by the U. S. Atomic Energy
Commission and is being used by
them as a "pilot plant" in the
designing of two larger synchro-
trons in the AEC's own labora-
tories.
At present it can produce 50
million volts of electricity, but
University experts expect to get
it up to full capacity of 300 mil-
lion volts within the year.
Prof. H. R. Crane said the use
of the machine for the immedi-
ate future will be two-fold:
1-to collect data on the per-
formance of the race track design,
which will help the AEC's pro-
gram, and 2-to get experiments
underway designed to eventually
reveal the construction of the
atomic nucleus.
Big Premiere
Set forOpera
Open night festivities for "Never
Too Late", the 1952 Union Opera
will have all the trimmings of a
Hollywood premiere, including ce-
lebrities and a man-in-the-street
interviewer.
Promotions manager M a r k
Sandground, '52, revealed that the
interviewer will be on hand Wed-
nesday before the 8:30 p. m. cur-
tain time at the Michigan Theatre
to greet Governor and Mrs. G.
Mennen Williams and President
and Mrs. Harlan H. Hatcher.
Tickets will be on sale between
1:30 and 5 p. m. at the Union
lobby ticket counter tomorrow,
Tuesday and Wednesday.

Play Month
To Feature
War .Drama
In conjunction with Interna-
tional Theatre Month the Univer-
sity Speech Department gill pre-
sent a production of Robert Sher-
wood's Pulitzer Prize play, "There
Shall Be No Night," Wednesday
through Saturday in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater.
In keeping with the interna-
tional theme, "There Shall Be
No Night" is the story of a Fin-
nish scientist and his struggle
to lead a peaceful life with his
family. To do this he must de-
fend. his homeland from Rus-
sian invasion. When Finland is
finally invaded he closes his
laboratory and joins the medical
corps.
While a member of the Play-
writes Company Sherwood wrote
two Pulitzer Prize Plays, "There
Shall Be No Night" and "Abe
Lincoln in Illinois."
Lydia Mendelssohn box office
will begin selling tickets for "There
Shall Be No Night" on Monday.
There will be a special student
rate of 60 cents for the Wednes-
day and Thursday performances.
Prices for all other performances
are $1.20, 90 cents and 60 cents.

The announcement that Edgar
Rice Burrows' "Tarzan" will re-
place Hopalong Cassidy (8:30 p.m.
Saturdays, WJR) may well indi-
cate that another entertainment
fad in the nation is past its peak
and fading fast.
The cowboy stories, especially
Cassidy's made a meteoric come-
back when television came into
prominence, because they were the
cheapest and most plentiful thing
on film. But even the kids got
tired of a steady diet of six shoot-
ers blazing away in the saloons
of the old west.
Look for the ultra-modern
space stories to begin to hit the
end of the planetary trail within
a year or so.
Incidentally the switch to Tar-
zan, a comic strip that's been in
the papers as long as many of
us have been old enough to read,
goes right along with the trend
of radio-video entertainment in
featuring the old songs on the big
shows as often as the brand new
ballads. Witness: Ken Murray and
Eddie Cantor this past week.
* * *
PREVIEWS of song and dance

numbers from "Never Too Late"
the 1952 Union Opera, slated to
open Wednesday, will highlight
the teletour on today's University
Television Hour (1 p.m. WWJ-
TV). Prof. Samuel Eldersveld will
present both sides of the picture
in his lecture on Voliticar parties'
nominating conventions when he
introduces Democratic State
Chairman Neil Staebler and his
Republican counterpart Owen
Cleary.
Prof. Phillip Jones will discuss
fractions on the mathematics
telecourse.
PROGRAM NOTES:
Patrice Munsel and Gordon
MacRae wil star in a special radio
adaptation of "Kiss Me Kate,"
Cole Porter's hit musical version
of "The Taming of the Shrew"
by Shakespeare, at 8 p.m. tomor-
row, WWJ.
4 Fred Waring and his Pennsyl-
vanians will feature Tschaikow-
sky's "Nutcracker Suite" at 9 p.m.
today on WJBK-TV.
Daily Ciassifieds
BringQuick Results

LOOK and LISTEN
With ALAN LUCKOFF

Critic Brown

To Lecture
Wednesda
John Mason Brown, a familiar
face to Ann Arbor audiences, will
be presented at 8:30 p m Wednes-
day at Hill Auditormim :
closing number of the current Lec-
ture Course.
Appearing here 4 r the fifth
consecutive year, :he versatile
author-lecturer - cri) ic - commen-
tator will deliver an entertaining
lecture, "Seeing Things", which
is titled after his weekly column
in the Saturday Review.
"One of the best lecturers in
the United States", according to
William Lyon Phelps, Brown pre-
fers to consider this aspect of
his career secondary to his duties
as an associate editor of the Sat-
urday Review. His major interestN
is in the theater and he has
written several volumes on this
subject.
Tickets for Brown's talk will go
on sale at 10 a. m; Tuesday in the
Hill Auditorium box office. They
are priced at $1.50, $1 and 50
cents.

-Daily-Larry Wilk
ATOMS "RACE" IN UNIVERSITY SYNCHROTRON

1 i

Retired .Dean
Paid Tribute~
At Luncheon
The substitution of railroad for
athletic scholarships was advo-
cated yesterday by James. B. Ed-
mondson, retired dean of the
education school in a humorous
speech at a luncheon in his honor.
A railroad between Angell Hall
and the new North campus to be
operated by retired faculty mem-
bers was also called for by the
educator, a train enthusiast for
many years.
The 100 people attending the
luncheon, sponsored by five edu-
cational honorary societies, pre-
sented the ex-dean with a new
brief case in addition to a horo-
scope and the degree of Doctor
of Conventium from the Uni-
versitas of Hardis Knockorum.
In return, Edmondson treated
his listeners with his views on the
present situation and future pos-
sibilities for railroads.
Before his "lecture," the retired
educator was paid a verbal tribute
by Charles Anspach, president of
Central Michigan College of Edu-
cation.

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