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March 20, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-20

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THE MICHIGAN'DAILY THURs

DAY, MARCH 20, 1052

PEEK PREDICTS:
Congress May Stymie Chief

By HARRY LUNN

It Republicans nominate and
elect a liberal President this fall,
his program might still be stymied
by a conservatively controlled Con-
gress, George Peek of the political
science department, predicted yes-
terday.
In a survey made for his na-
tional politics course, Peek em-
phasized that because Congress
has control over the President's
programs, it is important to con-
sider the probable congressional
make-up when voting for a Presi-
dential candidate.
"EVEN IF Eisenhower were
elected," Peek said, "his foreign
policy plans could easily be de-
feated 'i an unsympathetic Con-
gress."
P e e k determined probable
Congressional cIh a i r m a n by
checking GOP service records,
as committee heads are select-
ed on a strict seniority basis.
Because Congressmen most con-
sistenitly elected are from political-
ly "sure" states, they tend to be
the old-guard element in either
party, Peek noted. Thus in a Re-
publican victory, chairmanships,
go largely to conservative New-
Englanders and Mid-Westerners,
while a Democratic Congress is
ruled by Southerners. .. .....
This is well illustrated, Peek
said; in the present Congress
where 16 key Jobs are held by
Southerners.
In event of a GOP victory this
fall, conservative Clare Hoffman.
of Michigan would be in control
of the House Executive Depart-.
ment Expenditures Committee,
while in the Senate the correse-;
ponding group would be headed
by State Deparliment critic Jo-
seph McCarthy of Wisconsin.
"Let's assume Ike is elected,"
Peek said, "and John Foster
Dulles is named! Secretary of
State.
"You would still not only have

'l

JOE McCARTHY
.. .. may wield power
* ,-
McCarthy exercising State De-
partment control through funds
and inquiry, but it would be the
Bridges, Capeharts, Millikens and
Butlers, not the liberal Republi-
cans, who would control Con-
gress."
** *
MICHIGAN WOULD be fairly
powerful in a GOP Congress, Peek
commented. Besides Hoffman,
three other State conservatives,
Jesse Wolcott, Fred Crawford and
George Dondero are also slated to
head important House Commit-
tees.
Other House leaders will
come, on the whole, from pre-
dominantly rural sections of
Kansas, New York, Missouri,
Illinois, Pennsylvania, New Jer-

sey, Iowa, Ohio and Massachu-
setts-strongholds of GOP con-
servatism.
Peek called Rep. Tabor of New
York, who would take over Chair-
manship of House Appropria-
tions, "an extreme conservative
who may hamstring moves to
broaden foreign aid appropria-
tions."
CHAIRMAN OF the House Arm-
ed Services group would be Dewey
Short of Missouri who is current-
ly out of sympathy with the mili-
tary and in opposition to Univer-
sal Military Training, according to
Peek.
Senate line-ups show the
power balance with Congress-
men from Ohio, North Dakota,
Washington, Massachusetts, Ver-
mont, New Hampshire, Indiana,
Wisconsin, Colorado and Neb-
raska.
Sen. Bridges of New Hampshire,
present Senate minority leader, is
ranking minority member on both
the Armed Services and Appro-
priations Committees. In a GOP
Congress he would have to choose
which chairmanship he wanted,
but in either position he would
exert powerful control over the
President's program.
Charles Toby, the venerable
senator of crime-hearings tele-
vision fame, would be in charge
of the Interstate and Foreign
Commerce Committee.
Sen. Homer Capehart, author of
the Capehart amendment which
loosened price controls, would be
chairman of the Banking and Cur-
rency Committee.
If Robert Taft doesn't get a
better Job, he would be head of
the Labor and Public Welfare
Committee.
Exception to the general con-
servatism would be Henry Cabot
Lodge, slated for the top post on
the Rules and Administration
Committee.
However, Peek pointed out, the
Democratic picture is little bright-
er as far as liberalism goes. If
Adolph Sabeth, aged chairman of
the House Rules Committee,
should die, he would be succeeded
by a Southerner, Eugene Cox, 'of
Georgia.
Even now, Peek said, Sabeth is
hamstrung by an alliance of Cox,
several other Southerners and a
few conservative Republicans on
the Committee who control its
work. The Committee, considered
by many as the most important in
the House, would be headed by a
conservative Republican if the
GOP took over.

'U' Expands
TV Shows
Over State
By ALANLUCKOFF
The University took another
stride in the expanding field of
television education yesterday as
it announced the inauguration of
a new weekly TV show, "Under-
standing our World," on station
WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids.
Announcement of the new pro-
gram, which will start Saturday,
came on the heels of expansion of
the present "University television
Hour" to WKZO-TV Kalamazoo
each week starting Sunday. The
program is already seen in De-
troit and Lansing.
* * *
"THE NEW additions to our
schedule mean that we will sup-
ply education by television
through every video city in the
state," Hazen Schumacher, '51,
TV production coordinator said.
"No other school in the nation
has as extensive a television cov-
erage."
The new show will feature fa-
culty members from the Univer-
sity and from its Grand Rapids
extension service. The weekly
half hour lessons will cover psy-
chology, natural sciences, arts,
hobbies and current affairs.
Unlike the current University
program, each show will be a
complete unit rather than part of
a continuous course. The lectures
will be supplemented with visual
aids and brief dramatic sketches.
Saturday's initial show will
feature Prof. Wilbert J. McKea-
chie of the psychology depart-
ment speaking on "The Behav-
ior of Man."
Grand Rapids resident Mickey
Sager, '52, will act as hostess for
the series, and Robert Newman,
Grad., will be script editor. Prof.
Garnet R. Garrison, chairman of
the television department, will be
the producer.
The University's first venture
into the video medium was in No-
vember, 1950, when the first "Uni-
versity Television Hour" was ini-
tiated by Prof. Garrison.
Dorm Chairmen
There will be a meeting of
the newly elected Student Leg-
islature dorm chairmen at 4:30
p.m. today in the SL Bldg., 720
Forest.

Candidates Meet

Princeton University students
averted a raise in dormitory rates
this week by agreeing to take over
the dorm janitorial services.
The new work-instead-of-pay-
more program will be instituted in
September, according to a New
York Times report. It is expected
to save the University $75,000 a
year as well as halt what would
have been a $30 a year raise in
student rent.
Richter Talk
Set for TOday
"Graeco-Roman Minor Arts"
will be the subject of the second
student lecture of the Thomas
Spencer Jerome series to be given
by Gisela M.A. Richter at 4:15
p.m. today in Rm. D, Alumni
Memorial Hall.
Dr. Richter, honorary curator
of Greek and Roman arts at the
Metropolitan Museum, is well-
known among classical scholars
all over the world for her num-
erous books on Greek and Roman
antiques and art. Her third lec-
ture tomorrow will be on "Graeco-
Roman Art: Copies and Adapta-
tions in Painting and the Origi-
nal Contributions."

Princeton Students Give
Price Hike the Brush-off

THE IDEA OF such a plan be-
ing adopted here brought a slight
shudder from University Service
Manager Francis C. Shiel.
"That would be -a last ditch
measure," he said. "I've seen
some of those places."
According to Shiel, the Univer-
sity has considered the plan from
time to time "but it Just wouldn't
work out."
Student representatives to the
University Board of Governors of
the Residence Halls suggested a
plan similar to janitorial service
suspension just before the new
rates hike was announced here
last week. They through it pos-
sible several dorm services, could
be suspended to effect a saving.
But that type of measure is con-
sidered "too drastic for the Uni-
versity," Shiel said. "We want to
keep the buildings in as good a
shape as possible," he explained.
"The students might, keep them
up for a while, but they would
probably let them go before too
long."

-Daily-Don Campbell
SL OPEN HOUSE-SL president Len Wilcox, '52 makes candi-
dates and guests feel right at home at the "meet your candidates"
open house held yesterday afternoon in advance of the April 1
and 2 elections.
Education School Convocation
To Honor' Teacher Candidates

I

A.

A-

The seventeenth annual School
of Education convocation, in co-
operation with the Washtenaw
County Teachers Institute, will be
held at 2:15 p.m. tomorrow in
Rackham Lecture .Hall to honor
the candidates for the Teacher's
Certificate in the school.
Marvin L. Niehuss, vice presi-
dent of the University, will pre-
side. Virgil M. Rogers, Superin-
tendent of Schools at Battle
Creek and president of the Ameri-
can Association of School Admin-
istrators, will speak on "The Role
of the Teacher in School-Com-
munity Understanding."
Three honorary awards will
be conferred upon a teacher and
two students in the Education
PHOTOS COPIED
2Q Wallet-Size
2 De Luxe Prints $ 00
Original picture returned.
Send any size photo or negative.
Federal Wallet-Size Photo Co.
P. 0. Box 2448 Kansas City 6, Mo
(No C. 0. D.'s Please)

School for outstanding scholas-
tic records and professional pro-
mise.
Recipients of the Cleo Murtland
Award, the William H. Payne
Award, and the Burke Aaron Hins-
dale Award, respectively, will be
Douglas M. Selby, director of vo-
cational education in Mt. Pleasant
public schools, Elizabeth Allen,
Grad., candidate for master's de-
gree, and Bruce K. Nelson, Grad.,
candidate for doctoral degree.
rt" - iI

STUDENT
SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS

I1

CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMETRY.
(Nationally Accredited)
An outstanding college serving
a splendid profession.
Doctor of Optometry degree in
three years for students enter-
ing with sihty or more semester
credits in specified Liberal Arts
courses.
FALL REGISTRATION
NOW OPEN
Students are granted profes-
sional recognition by the U. S.
Department of Defense and
Selective Service.
Excellent clinical facilities.
Athlebic and recreat nol activi-
ties. Dormitories on the campus,
CHICAGO COLLEGE OF
OPTOMETRY
30 Belden Avenue
Chicago 14, Illinois

I

'r . /

REPAIRED
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT

I

Finney To Talk at Opening
Of Annual Inter-Arts Festival

Military Ball
Pictures
On display
again this week
TODAY
Administration Building

Fountain Pens repaired by
a factory trained man.
Webster-Chicago Wirerecorders
MORRILL'S
314 S. State , Ph. 7177

f

Illl

i

000

The Official Michigan Ring

The Fourth Annual Inter-Arts
Union Festival will open at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall with the performance of
two student compositions and a
speech by Prof. Ross Lee Finney of
the School of. Music.
Basing his talk on the relation-
ship of the creative artist to the
modern philosophy of the univer-
sity, Prof. Finney will discuss
"Creative Integrity at the Uni-
versity.".
He will stress the unique and
important contribution the uni-
versity has made by having the
artist work under its sponsorship.
Prof. Finney is a professor of
composition and the Composer
in Residence at the University.
In cooperation with Generation
magazine,. IAU will present a, per-
formance of music and poetry
published in the magazine at 8:30
p.m. Saturday in Rackham Assem-
bly Hlall. After this portion of the
program a panel of students and.
faculty will:discuss the magazine's
good and bad points.

"Should There Be an Inter-
Arts Union?" will be the topic
of discussion for another stu-
dent-faculty panel at 2:30 p.m.
Sunday in the West Gallery of
Alumni Memorial Hall.
The final program will be a per-
formance of dance compositions
at 8:30 p.m. Sunday in Barbour
Dance Studio. "The Silver Heron,"
a verse play to be danced, written
by Anne Stevenson, '54, will be
performed by the Modern Dance
Club. "The Harlot's House," based
on a poem 6iy Oscar Wilde, will be
danced by the ballet club. Con-
cluding the program will be a dis-
cussion lead by Prof. Abraham
Kaplan of the philosophy depart-
ment.
Center Tea Today
International Center will hold
its weekly tea for foreign and Am-
erican students from 4 to 6 p.m.
today in the International Center.
All students are invited to at-
tend.

1I

Immediate Delivery

fil

"Easy-Does-It"
LAUNDRY- SERVICE
j" Easy on you
14Easy on your time
;' Easy on your pocket book
t*' Easy on your daintiest washables
30 New Maytag Automatic Washers-5 Large Dryers

Accurate Sizing
Complimentary
Engraving

AUCTION SALE
SAT UR DAYMARCH 22
11:00 A.M.
Broadway Auction House
2194 Jackson Ave., Ann Arbor
Antiques, including rugs, dishes, lamps, furniture, books.
Also Complete Stock of Jackson China Shop.

Available on special order with fraternity
coat of arms or encrusted Greek Letters .. .
A small deposit\ will reserve yours until, you
want it. . --Tom and Meredith Suckling

Finished
SHIRT SERVICE
3-Day Delirery

DRY CLEANING
10% Discount

L G. BALFOUR CO.

Open Evenings For Your Convenience

1319 S. University

Phone 3-1733

A

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(4tckap4

SELF
SERVICE

Phone 2-4241

"Wear it proudly - It's a Michigan Tradition

1111

I

715 Packard (near State)

F

Senior Ball Pictures
READY TO TAKE HOME
TODAY

.

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She Almost Forgot To Buy
Her Ticket on the Vulcan

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ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
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Spectacatar Offering

Spring Vacation Train

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Savings up to 50%

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formerly 14.95 to 49.95

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Juniors' - Misses' - Women's - Half Sizes

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14 COATS
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SUITS
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Tissue Faille - Wool Jersey - Rayon Jersey - Nylons
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