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March 18, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-18

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,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1951

______________________ I U I

Eighth Tax
Official Gets
AX inNYC
WASHINGTON -(P)- Monroe
D. Dowling was ousted as an in-
ternal revenue "collector in New
York City yesterday because of
what officials called an irregulari-
ty in one of his personal income,
tax returns.
He was the eighth collector to
get the ax in the current investi-
ration of scandals in the nation's
tax collecting service, and the
third i the New York City area.
DOWLINQ was appointed by
President Truman last August to
take over from another ousted
collector, James W. Johnson, and
conduct a housecleaning in the
revenue district embracing upper'
Manhattan.
In the upper Manhattan dis-
trict, one of the biggest sources
of tax revenue in the country,
several employes had been fired,
suspendeg or indicted for irregu-
larities when Dowling got the
$11,500 a year job. A federal
grand jury and a House sub-
committee are investigatipg.
Revenue Commissioner John B.
Dunlap, in announcing that the
President had accepted Dowling's
resignation; added only that it
had been requested "in connection
with an irregularity in one of his
income tax returns."
Triangles Selects
Officers for '52
Thg new officers for Triangles,
Junir EngineerinV Honorary,
were elected at a meeting held
Sunday.
Peter Lardner, '53E was chosen
president, with Harold Holt, '53E
as treasurer, and Alan Krass, '53E

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

CLASSIFIEDS

CUBA'S IRON MAN-Gen. Fulgencio Batista, who,vaulted back
into power on the crest of a revolt, smiles broadly with upraised
hands as he is surAunded by Cuban soldiers at Camp Columbia,
Cuban army base.
'U' Counseling Agency
Accredits State Schools

t

The retiring officers Are presi-
ent Thad Epps, '53E, treasurer
ack Ehlers, '53E, and secretary
ruce Haynam, '53E.
TODAY ONLY-
JOHN LUND
ANN SHERIDAN
ins

By CRAWFORD YOUNG
Seven hundred Michigan high
Ahools have a special counseling
agency in the Administration
Bldg.
The all-purpose adviser, nurse,
coordinator and accreditor is the
Bureau of School Services, a four-
year old wing of the administra-
tion.
UNDER THE direction of Prof.
Lawrence E. Vredevoe, the Bureau
was established by the Board of
Regents in 1948 as part of a gen-
eral move to improve University
relations and services to secon-
dary schools.
Faced with misunderstandings
among many high school prin-
cipals as to the University's use
of its accrediting power and the
necessity for better coordina.,-
tion of the constant University-
U' Museum
Now Housing
Noted Beetles
One of the most prominent
beetle collections in the whole
country has recently been added
to the insect department of the
University Museum.
Containing over 100,000 beetles
of every size, shape and color, the
collection was made by Arthur W.
Andrews of Detroit whose death
in August, 1950 ended his 50 years
study of insects of the world and
especially Michigan..
Andrews was well acquainted
with natural scientists in Michi-
gan through his membership in
a unique organization known as
the Bryant Walker Scientific
Club, of which former Univer-
sity President Alexander G.
Ruthven was a member.
A large part of Andrews' nearly
complete collection of Michigan
insects was gathered on expedi-
tions he made for the University
Museum, many of them accompa-
nied by Ruthven. While Andrews
swung a beetle net, Ruthven col-
lected reptiles.

t

W"STEEL TOWN"
'WEDNESDAY

I

high school contacts ,the Re-
gents empowered the Bureau to
coordinate all services to the
secondary schools and invested
it with the broad duties of in-
terpreting the University to the
schools and vice versa.
A substantial improvement in
relations has been the result, Prof.
Vredevoe affirmed. "I don't think
any university in the country has
better relations with schools than
we do."
* * *
ONE OF THE fledgling bu-
reau's most significant functions
is directing the almost unique
University power of being the state
accrediting agency. The Universi-
ty was first to undertake this pro-
cess in 1871, and is now one of
the four state universities which
handles the important task. Most
states have a special agency to do
this.
In the past, some principals
have feared that their accred-
ited status might be lost if they
encouraged any but exceptional
students to attend the Univers-
ty.
But Prof. Vredevoe felt this mis-
impression had been eliminated
--"A student's record here is not
a factor in his high school rating,"'
he emphasized.,
* . s
A UNIVERSITY committee vis-
its each high school at least everyv
third year, the director indicated.
However, the major consideration
is not the "inspection" but the
type and quality of program of-
fered.
Of approximately 700 private,
parochial and public schools in
Michigan, 635 are currently on
the accredited list. This is used
b y colleges, a n d secondary
schools all over the country in
accepting students and their
credits.
Regular "Letters to the Schools"
are mailed out by the bureau, fill-
ed with University news of interest
to high schools, students and
teachers.
With the inspiration of the bu-
reau, thousands of high school
students visit the campus every
year. Cheerleaders, student coun-
cils, journalists and others find
their way to Ann Arbor annually
for special conferences or clinics.,
Lit Scholarships
To Be Offered
Applications for the 1952-53 li-
terary college scholarships may be
picked up until March 21 in Rm.
1010 Angell Hall.,
Students who have good aca-
demic records and who are in fi-
nancial need are eligible to apply.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Universitye
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-t
tive notice to all imembers of theI
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11
a.m. on Saturday).
TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1952 ,
VOL. LXII, No. 116
Notices
School of Business Administration:
Students from other Schools and Col-
leges intending to apply for admission
for the summer session or fall semester
should secure application forms in
Room 150, School of Business Admiis-
tration Building as soon as possible.
Ushers for Michigan Union Opera
Wanted:
Twenty men are wanted by the Mi-
chigan Union Opera to serve as ushers
for each performance of the show.
There will be three performances -
March 26, 27, and 28, in the Michigan
Theater. Tuxedos, black ties and soft
white shirts must be worn. Men who
wish to serve should call the Union
Opera Office in the Michigan Union
any afternoon. 3-5 p.m.
Dr. and Mrs. O. B. Campbell Scholar-
ship: College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts: Applications for this scholar-
ship for the academic year 1952-53 are
now available in Room 1010 Angell
Hal. Applicants must have had at
least one semester of residence in this
College.
Summer Positions: Students inter-
ested in summer employment will have
an opportunity to examine the Bureau
of Appointments' personnel requests
from camps, resorts, and industries,
Wednesday afternoon, i to 5 p.m., Room
3 B, Michigan Union. Those students
who have not yet registered for sum-
mer employment may do so at that
time.
A representative from the Russell
Kelly Office Service organization of De-
troit will be at the Michigan Union,
Room 3 B, from 1 to 5 p.m., Wed.,
March 19, to Interview women students
interested in summer employment. For
further information, call the Bureau
of Appointments, Ext. 371.
Personnel Interviews
The A. O. Smith Corporation of Mil-
waukee, Wis., will have a representative
here on the campus, Wed., March 19,
to speak to~ men graduating in June in
Accounting, (for their Training Pro-
gram) Electrical and Mechanical Engi-
neering.
The Travelers Insurance Company, of
Hartford, Conn., will be here on Wed.,
March 19, to interview men in the
Business Administration school and
LSA, in addition to others, for their
Group Field Service and Underwriting
positions. They are also interested in
seeing women for their Home Office.
The Ethyl Corporation of Detroit will
have a representative here on the cam-
pus to speak to mechanical engineers
for summer positions.
Personnel Requests
The State of Michigan Civil Service
annovnces examination for Employ-
ment Placement Specialist II. Require-
ments include a degree, preferably with
courses in such subjects as public or
business administration, occupational
analysis, employment problems and
practices, vocational education or guid-
ance, psychology, economicsor related
fields, in addition to two years of ex-
perience of related work. Applications
must be post marked March 26, 1952.
Announcement of Examination for hy-
draulic Engineer IV has been received.
This position involves planning engi-
neering work programs, assigns engi-
neering projects and provides supervi-
sion and advice during the course of
surveys and preparation of designs and
other related work. Requirements for
the position call for five years experi-
ence in general engineering of which
three years has been in the specialized
field of hydraulics. Applications for the
examination must be postmarked
March 26, 1952.
The publication, Career, which is a
commercial guide to some of the cur-
rent business opportunities is available
to all seniors and graduate students at
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building. This book is de-
signed to be of assistance to individuals
entering the business world and can
be obtained with no charge by stopping
at the Bureau and inquiring for a copy.
White Sands Proving Grounds of Los
Cruces, New Mexico, has openings for
men interested in Electronics, Chemical
and Mechanical Engineering, Aero-dy-
namics, Statistics, Mathematics and
Physics. For further information con-

at the Bureau and inquiring for a copy.
The Burgess-Norton Manufacturing
Company of Geneva, Illinois, has open-
ings for factory supervisors, heat-treat
supervisor, production engineering
draftsman and basic tool designer, and

production and inventory controllers,
cost accountants.
For further information, appoint-
ments and application blanks contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Ad-
ministration Building, Ext. 371.
Lectures
Student Lectures, The Thomas-Spen-
cer Jerome Series. "Arts of Italy in the
Classical and Hellenistic Periods" (il-
lustrated). Dr. GISELA M. A. RICHTER,
Honorary Curator, Greek and Roman
Department, Metropolitan Museum of
Art, 4:15 p.m., Tues., March 18, Room
D, Alumni Memorial Hall.
The Thomas Spencer Jerome Lectures.
Second lecture: "Graeco-Roman Art:
Copies and Adaptations in Sculpture'
(illustrated). Dr. GISELA M. A. RICH-
TER, Honorary Curator, Greek and Ro-
man Department, Metropolitan Museum
of Art, New York. 4:15 p.m., Wed.,
March 19, Rackham Amphitheater.
University Lecture, auspices of the
Department of Fine Arts. "China and
Japan in Art" (illustrated). YUKIO
YASHIRO, Member, Japanese National
Commission for the Protection of Cul-
tural Properties, 4:15 p.m., Tues.,
March 18, Rackham Amphitheater.
University Lecture, auspices of the
Department of English. "A Poetry
Reading." RANDALL JARRELL, poet.
4:15 p.m., Tues., March 18, Kellogg
Auditorium.
Mathematics Lecture: Prof. Irving
Kaplansky, University of Chicago, will
speak on the third lecture of a series
on Tues., March 18, 4 p.m., 3011 A.H.
Topic: "Ulm's theorem."
Lecture, auspices of the Department
of Zoology. "Productivity of the Aqua-
tic Environment." Dr. George L. Clarke,
Associate Professor of Biology, Harvard
University. 4 p.m., Tues., March 18,
1400 Chemistry Bldg.
American Chemical Society Lecture.
University of Michigan Section, ACS,
presents Prof. H.H. Uhlig, Department
of Metallurgy, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology, in a lecture on "Passi-
vity in Metals and Alloys," Wed., March
19, 8 p.m., 1300 Chemistry Blag. Visitors
are welcome
Academic Notices
Botany Seminar: "Problems in the
Distribution of Plants in No thern Ali-
chigan," by Charles D. Rictrds, Wed.,
March 19, 4 p.m., 1139 Natural 5c~ience.
Logic Seminar: (at a new tire) Wed.,
March 19, 2:10 p.m., 2219 Angell Hall.
Dr. Clarke will speak on the character-
ization of abstract algebras.
Sociology Colloquium: Professor L. J.
Carr and Mr. Lawrence Northwood, both
of the University of Michigan, will
speak on "Research Trends in In-
dustrial Sociology," Wed., March 19,
at 4:15 p.m. in the East Conference
Room, Rackham Bldg, Everyone in-
terested is invited.
Geometry Seminar. Wed., March 19, 4:10
p.m., 3001 Angell Hall. Mr. Jesse Wright
will continue his talk on "Liear
Graphs in Projective Geometry."
Orientation Seminar, (mathemacs,.
Wed., March 19, 2 p.m., 3001 Ange lHal
Mr. Lyjak will conclude his talk on
"Euler's Formula and the Begrnings
of Topology."
Engineering Mechanics Seminar. 'A ed.,
March 19, 3:45 p.m., 101 W. Engineer-
ing Bldg. Prof. H. M. Hansen will speak
on "Grammel functions and Modified
Holzer Tabulations."
Concerts
Voice Class Program under the direc-
tion of Arlene Sollenberger, 4:15 Wed-
nesday afternoon, March 19, in Roon
506 Burton Tower. Mary Ballard, so-
trano, Mary McNulty, contrai.o, and
Fred Fahrner, baritone, soloists; opean
to the public.
EUROPE
60.&MVa-from $500
(incl.steamer)
Bicycle, Motor, Fatboat, Rail, Self-drive,
Family living and Study Tours offered by
America's, largest organization for edu-
cational travel. Scholarships available.
Ste More-Spend Less
Our 19th Year
See your local represent.
ai se or wrse :

''q'A STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL 1
131TRAWL ASOCIATION 1
---545 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 17" MU 7.024
Ph. 5651
Ends Thurdsday
WA LT
DISNEY
presents
FANTAS--IA
TECHNICOLOR
with
STOK OWSKI r
RELEASED BY lEO RADIO PICTURES, I#C
"Like nothing
else in heaven
or earth!"~
STARTS FRIDAY
THE STORY OF A GREAT LOVEI

Events Today
Ballet Club: Due to a rehearsal for
Inter-Arts Festival, no dance classes
will be held tonight.
Modern Poetry Club. Randall Jarrell
will speak to the Club at 8 p.m., Tues.,
March 18, in the East Conference Room
of Rackham. Members are urged to at-
tend. Copies of Jarrell's poems are on
reserve in Angell Hall study hall.
Deutscher Verein-Meeting of the
German Club will be held at 7:30 p m.,
Tues., March 18, Tappan Hall. At the
Spielabend German students will teach
various games. Refreshments. Singing.
Christian Science Organization: 'es-
timnial meeting 7:30 p.m., U p p e r
Room, Lane Hall.
Square Dance Group meets at Lane
Hall, 7:15 p.m. All interested students
welcome.
Freshman Rendezvous Association
meets at Lane Hall, 7:30 p.m.
SRA Newsletter: A meeting for all
those interested in working on the SRA
Newsletter Staff will be held at Lane
Hall, 4:15 p.m.
Radio Workshop: Meeting at Lane
Hall, 7:15 p.m. for all interested stu-
dents.
Coming Events
Wesleyan Guild. Do-Drop-In for food
and fun, 4 to 5:30 p.m., Wed., March 19,
at the Guild. School of Christian Li-
ing at 6 p.m.
Michigan Arts Chorale. Meet at 7
p.m., Wed., March 19, University Highb
School Auditorium.
Finance Club. Messrs. E. H. Cress and
L. A. Tappe of the Ann Arbor 'rust
Company will speak to the Finane
Club on Thurs., March 20, 4 p.m,i ;
Business Administration Bldg. All in-
terested students areinvited. Informal
coffee hour will follow.
Canterbury Club. Holy Communion
at 7 a.m., Wed., March 19, followed by
breakfast at Canterbury House.
Weekly Union Bridge Tournament.
7:30 p.m., Wed., March 19, small Ball-
room, Union. Open to all students.
Ulr Ski Club. Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Wed., March 19, Room 3A, Union. Elec-
tion of officers. Movies.
IZFA-Intercollegiate ZionistrFedera-
tion of America. Discussion group on
Wed., March 19, 7:30 p.m., League.
Topic: Planning to visit Israel? All in-
terested are invited. Several Israelis will
be present to give a first-hand account
of the situation in Israel today.
Research Club. Wed., March 19, 8 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater. Papers: "The
Progress of the Royal Clauses-Legal
Method under European Codes," by
Prof. John P. Dawson; "Origin and
Growth of Mathematical Concepts," by
(Continued on Page 4)
FLTK LM TO EUROPE
NEW LOW AIR TOURIST RATES
E ectIve May 1t.
ROUND TRIP NEW YORK TO
SHANNON Only $433.80
LONDON Only 486.00
PARIS Only 522.00
FRANKFORT only 563.60
*Via Prestwick or Shannon
PFre subject to government approval.
Good low-cost meals available on plane.j
SEE YOUR
IKLM Royal Dutc Airlines
572 Fifth Avenue, New York 19, N. Y. f
Please send fall information on new
r KLM Air Tourist Rates W Europe.
NAME.,.* *
ADDRESS .w....u..w...........
* * * *** ** **

14

HI LLELZAPOPPI N

SATURDAY, MARCH 22. ..7:45 P.M.
Tappan Junior High Auditorium
(near Howard Johnson's)
' Tickets $1 .30, $1 .60
Hillel Office, Lane Hall, Administration Bldg..,
CHARTERED BUS AVAILABLE
Lowest air fares ever
to-

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday -issue.
FOR SALE
CANARIES, parakeets, love-birds, and
finches. Bird supplies. 562 1. 7th.
Phone 5330. Hours 1-7.
FOR SALE - Spencer medical micro-
scope, like new, triple nosepiece, oil
immersion, several eye pieces and
micrometer, with large microscope
lamp. Case included. Call 2-9259. )47
INDIA MOTORCYCLE SALES-Author-
ized B.S.A. and Sunbeam Dealer.
207 W. Liberty. Phone 2-1748. )33
Your Official UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN RING is waiting
e for you - NOW - at
Burr Patt's, 1209 S. Univ. )58
GABARDINE PANTS $5.49--$7.50 value.
Colors: brown, blue, green, grey-ad-
vertised in Life. Sam's Store, 122 E.
WASH. Ph. 3-8611. )50
BEAVER COAT-% length-$100; Suits,
size 10, beige, wine. REAL BARGAINS.
Call 2-7732 after 5 p.m.- )51
MISCELLANEOUS
THE. best cosmetics are "BEAUTY
COUNSELORS." Try them. Men's
and Women's. Phone 2-5152. ) 5M
SPECIAIr-on Poodle Permanents, com-
plete - $5.00. Modern Beauty Shop,
11712 S. Main, Fb. 8100. )20M
SHIRTS LAUNDERED-18c each. 1 day
service, no extra charge. U. & M. Dry
Cleaners. 1306 S. Univ. )23M

MISCELLANEOUS
APPLICATION PHOTOS-3 day service.
Wed. and Sat., hours 10'4. Palmer
Studio, Michigan Theater Building.
)21M
PERSONAL
AT LAST
Laundry service you wanted. 7 lbs.
for 56c. 1 day service. U. & M. Dry
Cleaners. 1306 S. Univ. )12P
BARGAIN OF THE WEEK - See 100
beautiful girls for only 90c. See
J.G.P., the best show on campus,
March 21 and 22. )13P
DO YOU PAY 5c for a newspaper? Then
why not TIME for 6c Phone 6007,
Student Periodical. )1P
BUSINESS SERVICES
PERSONALIZED TYPING. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Ph. 3-0254. 315 E. Lib-
erty (side door). )4B
WASHING-Finished work, and hand
ironing. Ruff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone 2-9020. )6B
RENTAL TYPEWRITERS-Repairs on
all makes. Office Equipment Co. 215
E. Liberty, Ph. 2-1213. )5B
TYPING-Reasonable Rates. Accurate
& Efficient. Phone 7590. 830 So. Main.
}1B
FOR RENT
APT. HUNTING? - Try Apt. Finding
Service at the Campus Tourist Home.
ROOMS by day or week. Kitchen Frio.
518 E. William St., 3-8454. )5R
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to CharlesbonS. C. for
two people April 4. Share expenses.
Call Michigan Daily, Box 9. )2T
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED DESPERATELY-Tickets for
Friday, March 28 Union Opera. Phone
7067 after 5:30. )3X

A

I1

1

r

1'

,II

4

,

LOOK!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -T .

OPENS SATURDAY
ODETS'
ROCKET TO
THE MOON
ARTS THEATER

I

Ideal for students. After 12 days you can
bring in $500 worth of purchases duty free.
only $61UO from Miami
takes you 'round South America
in 30 days with stops at Brazil,
Uruguay, Argentina, Chile,
'S Peru, Ecuador, Panama.
v 3OO from Miami
to Lima, Peru on a 17-day,
round-trip excursion ticket.
$555Jj from Miami
to Rio de Janeiro on a 30-day,
round-trip excursion ticket.

I

DepQortment
of Speech
Presents

Union Opera 1952
1
""NEVER TOO LATE"
March 26, 27, 28
Michigan Theater
(Friday, March 28, SOLD OUT)
MAi L ORDERS NOW ACCEPTED
MICHIGAN UNION- OPERA, TICKETS
Michigan Union, Ann Arbor, Mich.[

ak.mdbm$A

mmmwmm

m

Ends Tonight-
TYRONE POWER
"I'LL NEVER
it FORGET YOU"
-Plus -
"LETS GO NAVY"
WED. thru SAT.
The
Glorious
Story of
Songdom's
Great
Gus Kahn!
PLUS

NOW
Also
Tom & Jerry f Pete Smith
THURSDAY

THERE
SHALL
BE NO
NIG HT
by
Robt. C. Sherwood
A contribution to
Internotional Theater
Month
to promote
international

SANIAOO~..j
Yes-from May through October-
all of lovely, lively South America
is within your vacation reach, both
in travel time and travel cost.
Two ways to go. 1. Fly the west
coast with Pan American-Grace Airways to
Panama (over the route of Pan American
World Airways) then on south to Quito, Lima,
Santiago and Buenos Aires.
2. Fly the east coast with Pan American
World Airways. Stop at Puerto Rico, Trinidad
-fly on to Rio, Sao Paulo, Montevideo, "B.A."
Go one way-return the other!
These special fares apply to Tourist Service
with giant 4-engine planes.
Pan American is U.S. Sales Agent for Panagra

r.....

JlAN 15ANCtCO (WC . HI
a, ' ", WOOQMIAM
MIXIC SAN
CUIYAA r JUAN
W SM A T .:

MOR CF VAIN

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