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March 16, 1952 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 1952

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAGE

PAGE

o

Pucks ters

Iwi

Third

N CAA

Cro wn

*
Round Out
Five Season
VictorySpan
When Michigan won its third
NCAA hockey championship last
night, they completed one of the
finest five year spans in modern
Wolverine athletic history.
Under the leadership of coach
Vic Heyliger, who came to Michi-
gan in 1944, the Wolverine puck-
sters have managed to compile the
amazing total of 100 victories and
only 14 defeats in the last five
years. This represents a winning
average of 87 per cent.
The Wolverines have received
bids to all five of the NCAA cham-
pionship tournaments since they
were started in 1948.
In that year the Wolverines took
a record of 18 wins, two losses and
one tie to Colorado Springs. They
downed Boston College 6-4 in the
semi-finals and Dartmouth 8-4 in
the final round, and so emerged as
the winners in the first NCAA
hockey tournament.
The next two years Michigan
was invited again on the basis of
their superior season's records, but
fate was not to give the Wolver-
ines a repeat championship on
either occasion.
In the 1949 classic, when they
entered with a fine record of twen-
ty wins, two losses'and three ties,
they were eliminated by Dart-
mouth in the semi-finals, 4-2.
1950 saw the Wolverines lose to
Boston University by a 4-3 score,
after carrying a 22-3-0 record in-
to the tournament.
On both occasions even though
the Wolverines could not win,
they managed to take third place.
Colorado College, who like Mich-
igan has received a bid to all five
tournaments, was the winner in
1950. This is the only time that
the Tigers have managed to take
home the big prize.
Last year's version of the Mich-
igan hockey team brought a 20-4-1
record to Colorado Springs and
came off with the championship
by virtue of its 8-2 win over Bos-
ton University in the semi-finals,
and 7-1 victory over Brown in the
final round. In addition four
Wolverines received the distinc-
tion of being named to the All-
American hockey team.
This year Coach Heyliger was
forced to come up with new fresh-
men and sophomores, to replace
the veterans lost from last year.
The new men. along with seven
returnees developed into a first
class outfit and managed to wind
up 1wit1y a fine 20-4 record.
Whereas in previous years. sea-
son's records were used as the only
basis for determining the partici-
pants in the NCAA meet, this year
the Midwestern Collegiate Hockey
League was formed, and the top
two teams were designated to be
the west's participants in the tour-
ment.
Though Michigan did not man-
age to win this year's bid by much,
their victory last night proved
that they still are the class of
collegiate hockey.

CINDERELLA TEAM WINS:
LaSalle Wallops Dayton, 75-64, in NE

NEW YORK-(IP)-LaSalle's un-
ranked and unwanted "fuzz kids,"
paced by a pair of teen-aged fresh-
men, avenged a series of snubs to-
night by smothering Dayton's tow-
ering, experienced Flyers, 75-64,
for the 15th annual National In-
vitation Basketball Championship.
A standing-room-only crowd of
18,485 packed Madison Square
Garden to see the climax to the
year's most incredible Cinderella
story. In an earlier game, St. Bon-
aventure won the third place con-
solation by smashing a Lethargic
Duquesne, the tournament's No.
1 seeded entry, 48-31.
TOM GOLA, a muscular, good-
looking son of a Philadelphia po-
liceman, and Fred Iehle, a slender
one-handed pop-in artist who, like

Kola, is just 19, provided the im-
petus for the triumph by scoring
40 points between them. Gola had
22 and Iehle 18.
Thus for the third time during
the meet LaSalle humbled one
of the teams picked "at large"
to represent the east in the
NCAA championships, beginning
SPORTS
HERB COHEN: Night Editor

next Friday. The Philadelphian
were overlooked when the b1i
were passed out earlier ti
week.
Duquesne and St. John's, w:
with Dayton were selected for't
National Collegiate championshj
were semi-final and quarter-fi
victims of the sharp-shooting e
plorers.
LaSalle threw a collapsing ma
to-man defense at the boys fr
Ohio and held big Don Meine
Dayton center and the ' touri
ment's leading scorer, to 13 poin
The six-foot-seven Meineke, w:
previously had registered 71 poin
was limited to four field goals.
(ADVERTISEMENT)

EARL KEYES

REGGIE SHAVE

U

Ii1

Shure An' 'tis St. Patrick's Day
tomorrow at the

.,Net
vfeL5

ell

WILLARD IKOLA--Magnificent Michigan goalie who held the
powerful Colorado scoring attack to a bare one goal in last night's
4-1 Wolverine victory.

JOHN McKENNEL

PAUL PELOW

"",,

State Swint
Crown Won
ByFordsoii
By IVAN KAYE
Fordson High School, coached
by former Michigan swimming
star Gus Stager, grabbed first
place in the state class "A" cham-
pionship meet held last night in
the intramural pool.
The victorious Fordson crew
amassed forty-seven points to beat
defending champion Battle Creek
by ten points.
* s *
KEN GEST opened the evening's
activity with a 24.6 winning effort
in the 50 yard free style. This sent
Fordson into an early lead which
they never relinquished.
Bill Black of Fordson set a
new state record in the 200 yard.
free style when he covered the
distance in 2:02.1. This was
considerably better than the
2:05.6 with which Black quali-
fied for the finals.
Jim Kruthers gave Fordson an-
other first place when he nego-
tiated the 100 yard back stroke in
the time of 1:02.2. He then teamed
up with Tom Kwasney and Black
in a 1:21.4 winning effort in the
150 yard medley relay.
* . *
RUNNER-UP Battle Creek took
two individual championships as
John Hubley won the 100 yard
breast stroke in the time of 1:04.2,
and Jim Taft captured the diving
crown.

Michigan's 1951-1952
Season Hockey Record

December
December
December
December
December
December
December
January
January
January
January
January
January
January
February
February
February
February
February
February
Febrlary
March
March
March

5
7
8
14
15
20
21
4
5
11
12
16
18
19
8
15
16
22
23
29
1
7
s

Michigan 11
Michigan 9
Michigan 4
Michigan 4
Michigan 6
Michigan 7
Michigan 4
Michigan 4
Michigan 2
Michigan 5
Michiga 6
Michigai n7
Michigan 7
Michigan 5
Michigan 9
Michigan 10
Michigan 3
Michigan 7
Michigan 6
Michiga~a 3
Michigan 8
Michigan 6W
Michigan 11
Michigan 4
149

Michigan State College

University
University
University
University
University
University
University
University
University
U niversity

of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of
of

Montreal
Montreal
Toronto
Toronto
Denver
Denver
North Dakota
North Dakota
Minnesota
Minnesota

Michigan State College
University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
Michigan Tech
Michigan Tech
Colorado College
*Colorado College
McGill University
McGill University
Michigan State Colege
Michigan State College
Michigan T ech
Michigan Tech

r

2
4
4i
4
1
1
.4
:i

M' Jumper
Sets Record
I Keet
By DAVE LIVINGSTON
It isn't impossible to star in twoj
varsity sports at almost the same
time.
Michigan's Milt Mead proved
that it could be done Friday night
when he high-jumped six feet, six
and eleven-sixteenths inches to
set the only new record in the
annual Knights of Columbus
games.
, , ,
THE LANKY sophomore was
shooting baskets for the Wolver-
ine cage varsity less than two
weeks ago, and so the only track
meet be had participated in be-
fore Friday was the Big Ten meet
held last weekend at Champaign,
in which the best he could do
was place fourth.
But in Cleveland, the site of the
Knights of Columbus games, Mead
leaped one-sixteenth of an inch
higher than Dick Phillips of Brown
did last year in setting the form-
r record, and in so doing he
pulled down the only first place
garnered by the Wolverines.
- J

FLO'*RSHIM

Even the beer turns the color
of the Emerald Isle!

n
----,

* Overtime game
SEASON TOTALS:

WON 20. LOST 4.

Gray mins Two Union Titles

Three champions were crowned
yesterday as the Michigan Union
held the finals of its all-campus
pool, billiards, ping-pong and
bowling tournaments.
Larry Gray became a double
winner when he took the three
cushion billiards, and the straight
pool titles. Gray, who is the na-
tional collegiate three cushion
champ, defeated Mill Pryor in his
specialty and took Ed Wolden in
pool, 100-35.
In the ping-pong finals,

Suhrud Mehta triumphed over
Ron Hart by scores of 21-11,
21-11, and 21-16.
Chuck Barnhard captured the
bowling crown by rolling an 1189!
series for six games. Barnhard's
198 average enabled him to over-
come John O'Keefe, Don Linden,
Dick Goodwillie, Ken Robinson,
and Doug Lawrence in the six man
finals. Lawrence was second with
an 1130 series while in third place
was O'Keefe, 131 pins behind the
winner.

,Fv0Sr1[(
~YYiho7
i1
'If
s " s , ht

Fl

ATTENTION
PROFESSORS & STUDENTS!
EASTER VACATION
ONLY THREE WEEKS AWAY
So do not delay making arrangements
for your Transportation with
BOERSMA TRAVEL SERVICE
Call at 12 Nickels Arcade, Ann Arbor
or phone 2-3155
AN IDEAL GIFT
Stuffed Easter Bunnies,
! f
$1.75,
and
$2.75
SA l Il

LOW
RATES
THE WORLDS FASTESTPORTABLE
Smith Corona
MORRILL'S

CAMPUS BOOTERY
304 SOUTH STATE

Since
1908

314 S. State

Phone
7177

... the name that's
first in FINE SHOES,
.First in the Quality that is the
nation's standard of fine shoe
value. And for that very reason,
First in Popularity with the na-
tion's largest single group of fine
shoe wearers.

OPPORTUNITIES AHEAD FOR
MICHIGAN MEN
Opportunity can be defined in a,
number of ways. The manage-
ment of Ceco Steel gives an ex-
cellent definition of it in their
statement about Ceco's trainee
program:
"It is earnestly desired that the
men who are selected will be thos
who are looking for long-term em-
ployment with a firm whose ct-
look is also one of the long view
We want Ceco Steel's program for
trainees to be the beginning of a
lengthy, profitable, and satsfyin
experience for all concerned."
Shows Consistent Growth
Although only 40 years old, Caco
is the largest independent fabr.
cator of reinforcing steel in
U. S. Ceco supplies, more
form" service (for reinfored con
crete floor joists) than all of its
competitors put together. The
company also makes a complete
line of metal windows, industrial
steel doors, metal frame sreen,
.steel joists, steel roof deck, metal
lath and accessories and roofing
products. Cecos growth has been
steady. Today the firm employs
about 3,500 people in 14 plants
and 28 sales offices located coast
to coast-a good-sized growing or-
ganization but small enough to let
a man's presence be seen and felt.
The Friendly Attitude
Ceco's management is known for
its friendly attitude toward e+-
ployees. College trained men, and
others, are respected and promot-
ed on their merits. Attitudes of
genuine cooperation are ecour-
aged. The Ceco family takes a
sympathetic Interest in the prob-
lems of the newcomer and is al-
ways glad to see a man get ahea.,
Promotions are made from within
the company whenever there is a
man qualified by education and
experience and ability.
Excellent recreational, housing,
and educational facilities are lo
cated within easy driving distane
of Ceco's general offices and man
plant.
You can judge a company .~
asking its employees how they fee'
about it. Ceco employees like Ceco
. . . and you will too. Ceco's size
-big but not too big-further as
sures you that you will have an
opportunity to show what you can
do with the confidence that your
effort will be recognized and re.
warded appropriately.
If you are about to graduate in
engineering (or if you have had
some engineering courses), it wml
be wise for you to consider a pos-
tion with progressive Ceco Steel-
to see what it can offer you in the
way of lifetime opportunity, sati-a
faction, and job security.
For full information, see Prof.
C. L. Jamison of the School of
Business Administration or Mr.
Robert Vokac, Bureau of Appoint-
ments, in the General Administra-
tion building here on the Univer,-
sity of Michigan campus. Willard
E. Erickson, Ceco recruiting super-
visor, will be on campus Tuesday,
March 18. Or write to Mr. Erck-
son at our general offices:
CECO STEEL PRODUCTS'

U

BOOK SALE
Hundreds of Used Bargain Books
V alues f rom Nine Cents

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All Subjects
Published at
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and

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Index's -Pen Points"
S, , ,i .

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inc. r ,i..,,,.arle I

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