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March 14, 1952 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-14

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SEC

TIIEMICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY! MARCH 14, 195?

SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 19~

"-

TOTE THAT BARGE:
Tank Solves Marine Engineer Problems
** * *

By BOB APPLE
A square-ended barge may not
concern most people, but to the
Department of Naval Architecture
and Marine Engineering it pre-
sents quite a problem.
Because' a Mississippi barge
company often finds itself with
an odd square-ended barge to be
incorporated in with a flotilla of
raked-end barges they have asked
the engineering school to find the
best position for the odd barge
in the group.
** *
COMMANDED BY Professor L.
A. "Captain" Baier, chairman of
the Department of Naval Archi-
tecture and .Marine Engineering,
flotillas of models of these barges
are constantly pulled back and
forth across the engineering naval
tank until a total of eleven runs
have been made.
The barges are pulled by an
elevated moving car, piloted by
Professor Baier and containing
a generator, machinery for mov-
ing the car, trap doors for ob-
serving- the barges in motion
and a dynamometer table.
After.the runs have been made
and a few hours of mathematical
equations have been computed,
(the method of computation is
claimed to be a department secret)
the answer to the important prob-
lem is solved.
* sf
SINCE IT WAS built 48 years
ago, the 60 foot one-half mililon
gallon naval tank has been the
New Deadline
For Generation
The deadline for Generation
manuscripts has been extended to
noon tomorrow, because the mag-
azine is still essay-hungry, accord-
ing to Mel Zerman '52, managing
editor.
Although plenty of short stories,
poetry and plays have been turn-
ed in, editors are not satisfied
with the essays they have receiv-
ed and are issuing an emergency
call for more.
Manuscripts will be :eceived in
the Generation office in the Stu-
dent Publications Building.

-Dally-Matty Kessler
MODEL MODEL-The elevated car in the engineering naval tank
is used to pull models of ships and barges across the 360 foot
tank. The car makes eleven runs down the tank at a different
speed each time to determine the amount of resistance offered
to the models by the tank's water.

* * *
scene of many such tests. The
tank is usually used to find the
resistance offered to boat hulls
by water, because there is no way
to find this out mathematically.
Not to be specialized in this one
way the tank is also being used by
the physics department to test
under water acoustics. At the
present time the tank also is the
scene of a series of test runs to
help the army determine the best
type of canal to haul barges
through.
junior College
TalksBegin
The annual junior college-Uni-
versity conference will be held
today, with President Harlan H.
Hatcher slated to address dele-
gates from junior colleges all over
the state.
At 10 a. m. there will be a con-
ference of presidents and deans
in theRegents' Conference Room
of the Administration Building.
President Hatcher will greet dele-
gates at 12:10 p. m. at a luncheon
in the Union.
Delegates are slated to break up
into discussion groups at 1:30
p. m. in the' Rackham Building.
An assembly is scheduled to fol-
low the discussion groups at 2:45
p. m. in the Rackham Assembly
Hall.

Special Union
Constitutional
MeetingSet
(Continued from Page 1)
ing SL male an ex-officio mem-
ber of the Board, would better
represent student government
and strengthen SL-Union rela-
tions, Kathe said. The Union
feels that the Student Legisla-
ture has gradually replaced the
Mens Judiciary as the main voice
of student government on cam-
pus.
The third amendment, simplify-
ing further Constitutional chang-
es, would allow a two-thirds affir-
mative vote by all Union members
voting in a Board authorized ref-
erendum at the time of All-Cam-
pus elections, to approve revisions.
AT PRESENT, a three fourths
vote of a quorum' of 400 Union
members is needed for changes.
This law has proved a giant stum-
bling block in recent attempts at
altering the Constitution. The last
change under this system was in
1942 while a concerted effort in
1951 fell 200 members short of the
required number.
If the amendments are passed
they will have to meet approval of
the Board of Regents. The second
and third changes would be effec-
tive immediately if approved while
the first amendment would not go
into effect until the spring elec-
tions in 1953.
The greatest changes in the
Union 'Constitution were made
during the turbulent 1920s. At
that time, shortly:after the Union
opened, changes were constantly
being made to make the Union an
efficient body.

Poem Must
StandAlone
SaysCritic
By PHYLLIS WILLAR
To understand poetry, the read-
er must know the poem and not
the poet.
This was the crux of Harvard
Prof. I. A. Richards' talk on "Li-
terary Aximlysis"here yesterday.
The well-known literary critic
claimed that the reader must de-
tach himself from the poet's bi-
graphy in interpreting the content
of poetry.
THE LIGHTS were shut off in
the lecture room, in hopes, as he
explained, that even his own per-
son would be divorced from what
he was saying.
The white haired philoso-
pher described the cycle of po-
etry in terms of a diagram
which traced poetry from its
source through transmission to
i ts final destination. "The
source is open to the past and
the destination to the future,"
he said.
Peppering his speech with light
humor, the Englishman impressed
on the capacity audience that in
literary criticism he is mainly
concerned with what happens in
the poem and how it succeeds in
relation to the reader. The prob-
lem of understanding is one of
language.
.Language has a seven fold func-
tion, he said: indicating, charac-
terizing, realizing, valuing, influ-
encing, controlling, and purpos-
ing. Most poems contain all of
these elements but a sense of rea-
lization and value are the most
important, he maintained.
To illustrate the pertinent point
that poetry is a matter of com-
munication, he read selections
from T. S. Elliott, Milton, Brown-
ing, and Shelley's complete "Ode
to the West Wind." Poetry is
meant to be uttered, he said, and
the music and flowing intona-
tions of his voice set out to prove
this.
M'ichigras Group
Meets Tomorrow
There will be a meeting of
Michigras Decoration Comnmittee
at 10 a. m. tomorrow in the fenc-
ing room of Barbour Gymnasium,
Fran Windham '53, co-chairman
of the decorations committee, an-
nounced.
The meeting is open to anyone
who is interested, but people who
can do paper mache work are
particularly needed as are men
who can put up the decorations
in Yost Field House the week be-
fore Michigras.
'Sunland Special'
Tickets Available
Reservations for all features of
the Wolverine Club's "Sunland
Special" spring vacation train
trip to Florida can be made from
1 to 4:30 p. m. today and every
day until March 26gin the Ad-
ministration Building.

The Shaw Chorale will be heard
on the Choral Union series at 8:30
p. m. Tuesday, in Hill Auditorium.
Hailed by music critics all over
the country for their fine musi-
cianship and imaginative singing,
the choral group has planned a
varied program ranging from Mo-
zart to Gershwin for their Ann
Arbor concert.
The group has attained wide
notice through their concert, ra-
dio, and phonograph perform-
ances. Composed of 32 picked
voices and 19 instrumentalists

-

NEW STYLES FIRST AT WILD'S

Y:'

Exploding South Quad

sport
attire

comprising a concert orchestra,
, the Chorale first began as a
small mixed chorus, the Chapel
Choir, which confined itself to
sacred music.
Gradually building in number
as the musical prestige of its con-
ductor Robert Shaw grew, the
Collegiate Chorale became a full
project in itself.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

I

By JAN WINN
There was something just a bit
strange about a midnight shower
South Quad resident Jack Seagle
took this week.
As the Scott House Assistant
Resident Advisor was merrily
scrubbing away the water sudden-
ly stopped flowing and a thick
white cloud exploded from the
nozzle. Breathing was practically
impossible.
Teaching Forum
To Be Held Today
The third forum on College and
University Teaching will be held
from 3 to 5 p. m. today in Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
The subject under discussion
will be "How to Teach by Discus-
sion; How to Lecture Well."
Members of this week's panel
are Prof. J. Philip Wernette of
the business administration school
who will act as chairman, Prof.
John Arthosrof the English de-
partment, Prof. Phillip S. Jones
of the mathematics department,
Prof. Marshall M. Knappen of the
political science department and
Dean Earl V. Moore of the music
school.

Seagle turned off the shower
immediately and left the smoke-
filled lavatory, coming back to
find the cloud settled and small
flames on the shower floor.
* * *
DON BROWN, who came into
the lavatory a few minutes after
the incident, said that. "We could
still smell the gas the next morn-
ing.".
South Quad manager, Leo
Vogel, attributes the occurence
to "a mere buildup of chlorine
in the water." According to Vo-
gel some chlorine accumulating
in the water tank escaped, caus-
ing the "disagreeable odor."
City Water Office head Harry
Caswell on hearing of the "phe-
nomenon"' maintained that "It
couldn't have been caused by any-
thing in the water." Caswell was
certain that chlorine could not
form a cloud of gas.
Seagle, when contacted seemed
little affected by his escapade dis-
missing it as. "really nothing to
speak of" and "it might happen
about once in 1,000 years."
The shower has been in use
since Wednesday morning and re-
ports indicating that the only
compound being emitted is water.

I

Choral Union To Feature Shaw
Chorale in Tuesday Concert

i

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