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March 13, 1952 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-13

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Y..

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 19324

_______________________________________________ I

ENTISTRY SCHOOL AHEAD:

4-

Noted Critic STRICTLY FOR THE BOYS:

Campus Blood Drive Gains Momentum

CLASSIFIEDS

1
l
d
i
1
'i

By MARGE SHEPHERD
More than 1,000 students, fac-
ulty and staff members pledged
blood for the "Beat Texas U" blood
campaign as cards began pouring
into the Office of Student Affairs
yesterday.
During the first two days of do-
nating at the six-bed mobile unit
in the South Quad basement, 250
pints of blood have been donated.
The unit will remain on campus
until March 21 and it is expected
that a full schedule of donations
will be maintained until the last
day.
* * *
SINCE MANY students register
for donating at the South Quad
center figures for individual
houses registered at the student
affairs office are only approxima-
tions. Final tabulations will be
made after all donations have
been taken.
According to cards received at
the Office of Student Affairs
yesterday the law school has
signed 105 pledges, dentistry,
136, Stockwell Hall, 57, and their
brother dorm Gomberg, 72, and
Martha Cook, 38. Phi Kappa
Tau and Sigma Alpha Mu fra-
ternities and Tri Delt sorority
are tied with 23 pledges.
Student pledges now outnumber
the faculty and staff by more than
100.
* * *
THE DONATIONS are progress-
ing smoothly at the South Quad
blood center, according to Mrs.
Ethyl Atkinson, executive secre-
tary of the Washtenaw County
Red Cross chapter. Facilities and
volunteer workers are available to
handle seven donors every 15 min-
utes.
Students wishing to pledge blood
may still obtain pledge cards in
housing units, from campus or-
ganizations or at the Administra-
tion Bldg. Those turning in cards
at the Office of Student Affairs
now will be scheduled according to
their preference. Others may sim-
ply register at the South Quad
basement and be scheduled fo
donating immediately.
SL Wing To Meet
The administrative wing of the
Student Legislature will hold a
meeting at 4:10 p.m. today at the
Student Legislature Building, 122
S. Forest. All interested persons
should attend, SL Vice-President
Bob Baker, said.
Speaker at Hillel
Prof. Theodore Newcomb of the
psychology department will speak'
to Hillel at 7:45 p.m. tomorrow
in Lane Hall.
Travel and study
ABROAD
this summer1
-
LOWEST FARES EVER
make university-sponsored tours
via TWA most attractive.
Spend your summer profitably and
enjoyably on one of 16 four- to ten-
week study tours in Great Britain,
Europe, Scandinavia, Asia or Africa.
Earn full credit while you travel and
study. Arranged by specialists in
the educational-travel field, in co-
operation with TWA. Tour price
takes care of all necessary expenses,
including TWA's money-saving new
tourist fares.*
For tour infdrmation, mention

countries that interest you most
when you write to: John Furbay,
Ph.D., Director, TWA Air World
Tours, 80 E. 42nd St., New York
17, N. Y.
*Effective May 1 subject to gov't approvat
MiANiSWOrnD AINuJNfl
Friday & Saturday
DAN ANDRES- OROTHY MWRE
PLUS
'A I

* * 4' *

To Lecture
Here Today
T.A. Richards, prominent British
philosopher, author and critic,
will give a talk on "Literary
Analysis" at 4:15 p.m. today in
the Rackham Lecture Hall.
The versatile Englishman has
led a colorful and varied career.
He has written several books on
literary criticism, including "Sci-
ence and Poetry," "Practical Criti-
cism," and one of his earlies and
most influential, "Meaning of
Meaning." In his works, he has
been primarily concerned with re-
dusing the problem of literary
criticism to a science.
, 4, ,*
THE SPRIGHTLY philosopher-
psychologist has been instrumen-
tal in developing a Basic English.
An attempt at a universal lan-
guage, it reduced the English lan-
guage to 600 basic words. He
prepared a version of Plato's Re-
public with this system and re-
cently came out with a book on
Homer in the same style.
When the Basic English the-
ory was first put forth it created
a revolution in conservative lit-
erary circles.
But Richards held steadfast to
his plan and insisted that even
the Bible could be interpyeted by
the 600 words he considers essen-
tial to the English language.
Noted as a teacher, his courses
are aimed at interpreting poetry
as a problem in reading as opposed
to the convention stand of reading
poetry for its content. For 'his
important contributions, he is
considered one of the most influ-
ential critics in the last 25 years.
He started his illustrious career
as a fellow at Cambridge and he
is now a full professor at Harvard.
In his spare time, when he is not
lecturing, teaching, or writing, he
enjoys his hobby of mountain
climbing.
UNESCO Will
Hold Discussion.

By ERIC VETTER
Rumors that Michigan co-eds,
will attempt to crash the front
door of the Union during Satur-
day's annual open house has
Union staffmen concerned.
"A repeat performance of last
month's unprecedented leap year
day storming of the traditional
male entrance is liable to destroy
the tradition entirely," staffman
George Chatas claimed.
SATURDAY is Union Open
House day when both sexes are
free to roam the confines of the
building. But the front door policy
is a sacred issue to Union mem-
bers and counter plans are being
organized to thwart the women's
attempts should they materialize,
Chatas, the chairman of the open
house, said.
In any event, activities rang-
ing from a swimming show to a
tour of the eight story tower are
slated for the affair which is
designed to better acquaint the
students and townspeople with
the activities of the Union.
The swimming show will feature
the "Michifish" in a synchronized
aquatic program in the Union pool
from 1:50-2:20 and 3:15-3:45 p.m.
Beginning at 2 p.m. the finals and
semi-finals of the all campus bil-

liards, pool, and ping-pong tourn-
naments will be decided with
trophies awarded to the winners
in each event.
* * *
A DISPLAY entitled "Energy in
Action" will be set up in the
main ballroom. A working model
of a jet engine, a model atomic
power plant, a steam engine oper-
ated by ice as a fuel, and a dem-
onstration of the principles of
colored television are among the
displays to be shown and demon-
strated at 1:30-2:30 and 4-5 p.m.
' On the first floor, an exhibi-
tion of various types of locks
dating from Revolutionary War
days to the present will be
shown. Also on the first floor
will be the winning photographs
in the recent Union photography
contest.
Bob Leopold and his band will
provide the music at a mixer
dance in the North Lounge from
3:15-5:15 p.m. League hostesses
will serve free cokes and donuts
as refreshments.
A meeting of Union members
to vote on proposed amendments
to the Constitution will take place
in the ballroom from 2:30-3:30.
"And it's all free," Chatas em-
phasized.

nion 1aK~ rs rm ; am
On Coed Crash Threat

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.84
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M., Saturdays,
11:30 A.M., for Sunday issue.
LOST AND FOUND
REWARD-Lost Brown Wallet vicinity
State St. Barbara Spencer 2-3225.
)2L
$5 REWARD for info leading to recov-
ery of lightweight Schwinn bike bor-
rowed from 1617 Washtenaw night of
March 8. Phone 2-9111. )22L
FOR SALE
CANARIES, parakeets, love-birds, and
flnches. Bird supplies. 562 S. 7th.
Phone 5330. Hours 1-7.
ARMY-NAVY type oxfords $6.88., Sizes
6-12. Widths A-F. Sam's Store, 122
E. Washington. ) 38
FOR SALE-Full Dress Suit (tails) Size
38. Very good condition. Right in
style for Senior Ball. Call Sky Has-
kell, 9274 after 7 p.m. )40
BIR'THDAYReminder-Elgin American.
Zodiac Compacts--The correct sign.
For the Correct Girl-reduced from
5.00 to 2.25. Burr Patt, 1209 So. Uni.
)39
BRITISH BICYCLE-Lights, $27. Write:
Waldner, 423 High, Ann Arbor. )42
TUXEDO, Blue Gabardine suit. Both
37's. Reasonable. Call evenings. 2-4401,
215 Winchell, W.Q. )43
DIAMOND RING - Emerad-cut, 0.85
carat, flawless, blue-whi*r, platinum
mounting. Will cost you plenty but
far more anywhere else. Call 2-4693
evenings or write Box 10, Michigan
Daily. )41
ADMIRAL-Mahogany Radio-Phone, 78
R.P.M. Perfect condition. $19.50. Al-
so albums-ylphides, Carmen, Prince,
Igor, Scheherazade, etc. Cheap, Dial
2-1570. )45
1940 OLDS 4-door, radio, heater, de-
froster, 1952 license. Call at 411 E.
Jefferson, or phone 3-1213. )46
:Read Daily Classifieds

FOR SALE
EASTMAN MODEL EE 16m. Movie Pro-
jector. Phone 6867 Eve. )44
ROOMS FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM for man across from
Bus. Ad school. Call 814 Hill after
six. )19R
MISCELLANEOUS
APPLICATION PHOTOS-3 day service.
Wed. and Sat. hours 10-4. Palmer
Studio, Michigan Theater Building.
)21M
SHIRTS laundered. 18c each. 1 day
service. U & M Dry Cleaners & Laun-
dry. 1306 S. Univ.
SPECIAL-on Poodle Permanents, com-
plete -$5.00. Modern Beauty Shop,
117% S. Main, Ph. 8100. )20M
FOR "Beauty Counselors Cosmetics"
creams, colognes, soap, etc. for both
men and women, Phone 2-5152. )18M
PERSONAL
WHY bother with your laundry? We
can do it at 8c a lb. 1 day service.
U & M Dry Cleaners & Laundry. 1306
S. Univ.
WE'LL TAKE phone calls from strang-
ers and order subscriptions for them.
Student Periodical, 6007. )1P
BUSINESS SERVICES
PERSONALIZED TYPING. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Ph. 3-0254. 315 E. Lib-
erty (side door). )4B
RENTAL TYPEWRITERS -Repairs on
all makes. Office Equipment Co., 215
E. Liberty, Ph. 2-1213. )5B
TYPING-Reasonable Ratos. Accurate &
Efficient. Phone 7590, 8305. Main. )1
NOW IS THE TIME!!I
Let a Michigan Daily classified ad
help you And a ride home for Spring
Vacation. Call 2-32-41. )6B
HELP WANTED
STENOGRAPHER to work in local en-
gineering office week of April 7
Spring Vacation). Dictaphone exper-
ience would be helpful. Phone 2-5638.
)10H
FOR RENT
APT. HUNTING? -- Try Apt. Finding
Service at the Campus Tourist Home.
Rooms by day or week. Kitchen Priv.
518 E. William St., 3-8454. )5R
A PROFESSIONAL or business girl to
share attractive bungalow with busi.
ness girl. Close to town, bus lines.
$40 month. References required.
Phone 8910 after 5:30. )12F

-Daily-Bruce Knoll
STOCKWELL DRIVE-Marilyn Miller, '55, marks up the latest
results in Stockwell Hall's between corridor blood donor drive.
The dormitory has scored 57 pedges in the drive thus far with
brother dorm Gomberg House pedging 72.
Prof. Hobbs Discloses Plans
For Honduran Isthmus Canal.

-1

I

By ARLENE BELL
Proposed plans for a new trans-
isthmian canal across Honduras
to supplement the "inadequacy"
of the present Panama Canal, were
disclosed by Prof. William H.
t Hooft Says
Church Must
Be Liberate
"The Church of Christ, that of
the New Testament, needs to be
liberated from churches as we've
made them today," the Rev. W. A.
Visser 't Hooft asserted last night
before a large audience in Rack-
ham Assembly Hall.
Delivering the third lecture in
the "Religion in Life" series, the
present Executive Secretary of the
World Council of Churches con-
tinued, "The Church can be liber-
ated and there are signs in our
own time that it is being liberated.
Often a church becomes most free
when it looks most persecuted."
Drawing an analogy between
the Church and a jack-in-the-box,
he maintained that when it is
least expected, and suddenly, the
Church emerges in a new way.
"The effect is achieved by pres-
sure," he stated.
"Marxist critics accuse us of in-
creasing imprisonment by secular
force," he said. "We must accept
the fact that non-theological fac-
tors, such as society, economics
and politics, shake the churches'
life."

Hobbs, professor emeritus of the
geology department, at a lecture
in the Rackham Amphitheatre last
night.
Army engineers have estimated
that by 1960, the Panama Canal
will not be able to handle com-
mercial shipping on peak days,
and by 1970 on any days.
PROF. HOBB'S plan calls for
the building of twin tunnels 146
miles long with open-ditch canals
at both ends through the isthmus
of the Republic of Honduras. Un-
der Hobb's plan the work could
be. finished in a comparatively
short time-approximately five
years.
Each combined tunnel-canal
will be 135 feet wide and 175
feet high, permitting passage of
the largest ocean liners and war
vessels.
Two of the main problems, ven-
tilation and trans-shipment of
vessels through the tunnels, have
been provided for by Prof. Hobbs.
Ships would be towed by electric
locomotives operating from tracks
on berms at each bank of the
canal, eliminating the smoke from
the ships, and the ventilating
problem. Power for the locomo-
tives and electrification of the
tunnels would be furnished from
a hydro-electric plant to be con-
structed at Lake Yojoa with a
potential of 25,000 horsepower.
Prof. Hobbs estimates the pro-
ject would cost about one and a
half billion dollars and is almost
certain to be approved by the
Honduran government if it is
cleared by Congress.

II

A European Confederation will
be the topic of a panel discussion
among four foreign students at a
UNESCO Council Meeting, to be
held at 7:30 p.m. tonight, at the
Madelon Pound House.
The participants will be Hart-
muth Hensen of Germany, Robert
Donnasias of France, Ton Bronw-
ers of Holland, and Andre Wil-
lieme of Belgium.
Their discussion is a part of
the UNESCO Council's attempt to
carry out the aims of the United
Nations Educational, Scientific
and Cultural Organization by pro-
moting international understand-
ing through mutual exchange of
ideas. However, the campus group
has no direct connection with the
international organization.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tivesnotice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (11
a.m. on Saturday).
THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1952
VOL. LXII, No. 112
Notices
Student Loans for Men: Students un-
able to pay, in full, loans which are
now due should see Miss McKenzie,
1059 Administration Building. The Loan
Committee will meet March 18 to ap-
prove new loans. Please have applica-
tions submitted before the meeting.
Faculty, College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts: The freshman five-week
progress reports will be due Fri., March
14, in the Academic Counselor's Office,
1210 Angell Hall.
College teaching positions in Soci-
ology: The Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information has re-
ceived severalarequests for college
teaching candidates with a doctorate in
Sociology. For further information call
at 3528 Administration Building or
phone University extension 2614.
Personnel Interviews
Ceco Steel Products Corporation, Chi-
cago, Ill., will be here on Tues., March

18, to interview June and August men
in Business Administration, Civil En-
gineering, Mechanical Engineering, and
Architectural Engineering, and LSA
students with some courses in Engi-
neering.
Koppers Company, Inc., Pittsburgh,
Pa., will have a representative here on
Tues., March 18, in the morning to see
Business Administration students grad-
uating in June for sales work.
Opportunities for June engineering
graduates for Commissions in the US-
NR: A representative from the Depart-
ment of the Navy's Bureau of Ord-
nance will be on campus Fri., March 14,
to discuss commissioning of qualified
engineering June graduates as Ord-
nance Specialists in the grade of En-
sign, on an inactive status for duty in
event of mobilization. Male candidates,
at least 19 years old, who are veterans
and will obtain a degree in engineer-
ing, physics or a PhD in applied mathe-
matics are eligible. During the day, the
representative will be at the Bureau of
Appointments for Interviews. Call Ext.
371 for an appointment. A group meet-
ing will be held at 5 p.m., 229 W. Engi-
neering, for all interested students.
Personnel Requests
The U.S. Civil Service Commission
announces the examination for dieti-
tians for filling positions in hospitals
(Continued on Page 4)

Union Opera 1952
"NEVER TOO LATE"
March 26, 27, 28
Michigan Theater
(Friday, March 28, SOLD OUT)
MAIL ORDERS NOW ACCEPTED
MICHIGAN UNION OPERA, TICKETS
Michigan Union, Ann Arbor, Mich.
1 I
- - _ -tickets for March 26, 27, at
(circle one)
1 $2.25 $1.75 $1.25 I
(circle one)
Checks payable to Michigan Union Opera
All orders must have self-addressed stamped enve-
lopes enclosed.
a......-...-...-..------..-..-....-------

II rf--

t

IL

Continuous From 1 P.M. 44c
to 5 P.M.
Eves.Sun,
65c
TODAY AND FRIDAY

1
1
1
i
I
s
1

I

-- - - - -

O 2 8TIR 7dCNUYFp OX Et4.5!

Fri

Y
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
Tickets $2.00, $1.50
BOX OFFICE

Ii?

te r A~ p S
urhum-,N .

.}' y
;

Also
Wonder Emperors Rhythm
Gloves Horses News
--- Coming Saturday
ANN SHERIDAN -- JOHN LUND
"STEEL TOWN"
and
The
CINIMA GU1ILD Wolverine
Club
present
with pride
John Ford's Masterpiece
heC nformer
with X
VICTOR McLAUGHLIN

I

Starting 44c
TODAY 65c
ADVENTURE RIDES THE BURNING SANDS/
~ .~,-- -

until 5
after 5

P.M.
P.M.
*

11

I

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