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March 12, 1952 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-12

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'I

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1952

American Colleges
Shifting to Science
Enrollment Drop in Liberal Arts
Schools Revealed by Time Survey

By CAL SAMRA
American colleges and universi-
ties are gradually turning away
from the liberal arts and humani-
ties in favor of the natural and
applied sciences, according to a
recent New York Times survey.
The Times survey, which reach-
ed 100 educational institutions, re-
ported that, in comparison with
enrollments 10 years ago, propor-
tionately fewer students are in
the liberal arts than in the tech-
nical and professional fields. The
survey was conducted by Benjamin
Fine, Times education editor.
MOREOVER, due to steadily de-
clining college enrollments, a
greater number of liberal arts
teachers have been stricken from
faculty payrolls.
The liberal arts field has six
per cent fewer professors this
year than last, Fine reported,
while in thesnatural and applied
sciences, only one per cent of the
faculty members were dropped.
The faculties in medical and re-
lated sciences gained seven per
cent.
Future dismissals, the Times
predicted, would take an even
heavier toll of humanities profes-
sors.
FINE REVEALED that the fields
Morris D ies
'Wrong-Doing'
WASHINGTON -()-Newbold
Morris faced a battery of Senate
investigators yesterday and brisk-
ly told them they would find no
"wrong-doing" in the part he
played in a profitable series of
surplus ship deals.
If some of the ships were used
later in trade with Red China, he
said, it was not his doing-he
only found out'about it by reading
the papers.
President Truman's anti-cor-
ruption chief drew a capacity
crowd when he appeared before a
Senate subcommittee for the first
time in his extraordinary role of
the investigator under investiga-
tion.
Confidently, the tall New York
lawyer told Sen. McCarthy (R-
Wis.) at one point:
"You impute some wrongdoing
in this transaction. There isn't
any!"

of foreign languages, English and
history have been the hardest hit,
The number of students in these
courses has declined most sharply,
resulting in faculty dismissals.
The survey also indicates that
in 1952-53 colleges and universi-
ties expect to have fewer stu-
dents in the humanities, social
studies and liberal arts.
At the same time, the natural
and applied sciences expect a de-
crease of only five per cent.
THE POST-WAR trend. away
from the humanities has been due
to several reported factors:
Nowadays young men and
women are allegedly more prac-
tical and more interested in pro-
fessional and technical fields
than were those a decade ago.
Many educators point to the
emphasis placed on technical sub-
jects by the military services, by
war-related industries, and by re-
search divisions of the govern-
ment.
Then too, the discovery of atom-
ic power, harnessed for both war
and peace-time use, has had its
influence on many students who
see an opportunity to make a
profitable career out of the new
field.
LOCALLY, Prof. Algo Hender-
son, of the education school, gave
a cyclical explanation for the
trend.
"In the early thirties," Prof.
Henderson pointed out, "the de-
pression and the human misery
of the decade brought about a
flourish in the study of the hu-
manities, as efforts were made
to improve existing conditions."
The post-war period of pros-
perity, however, resulted in an
emphasis on technology and sci-
ence, he explained.
* * *
The University was not included
among the institutions canvassed
by the Times, and no facts and
figures have yet been compiled to
show the trend here.
BLit in speeches all over the
state, President Harlan H. Hatch-
er has been continually stressing
the tlheme that the University
must do- more than train techni-
cians; that this institution is ob-
ligated to acquaint its students
with the humanities.
At any rate, the Times survey
threatens to rekindle the age-old
educational controversy between
men of science and the champions
of liberal arts.

Steel Mills
Threatened
ByWalkout
PITTSBURGH -(IP)- The CIO
United Steelworkers spread the
word through the nation's steel
mills yesterday-"get ready for a
possible strike at the stroke of,
midnight, Sunday, March 23.
About 650,000 NSW members
who work in basic steel producing
plants across the country will stop
work to back up contract demands
unless the Government's Wage
Stabilization Board advances a
recommended settlement by then
which is acceptable to both union
and the steel industry. The WSB
proposal may be made anytime
within a week or two.
UNION CHIEFTAINS are set-
ting up plans for a walkout by
holding mass meetings of workers
in various steel centers at which
international officers and district
directors outline procedure in the
event of a strike.
The mass meetings on strike
plans don't mean a work stop-
page is inevitable. It does mean
the union is serious about its
strike threat and is laying the
groundwork for a strike which
could be called off in amo-
ment's notice in the event of
a satisfactory settlement.
Last fall the union opened ne-
gotiations with the nation's larg-
est steel companies and levelled
identical 22-point demands for an
181/2 cent hourly wage boost for
men now averaging from $1.90 to
$1.97 an hour, a guaranteed an-
nual wage, union shop and other
contract benefits.
There have been published. re-
ports that the WSB is going to
recommend that the steelworkers
be given a raise of from 14 to 20
cents an hour and that the indus-
try will be allowed to raise prices
about three dollars a ton.

-AP News Photo
UNCONCERNED-Eight-month
old Alletta du Pont Bredin is the
youngest of the 186 du Pont
family - defendents involved in
an anti-trust suit filed against
the family's huge industrial em-
pire by the government. But
Alletta remains undisturbed.
Cut Rates Offered
For Florida Trip
Special cut-rate prices for trans-
portation, entertainment and
meals have been arranged by the
Wolverine Club on the student
special Florida train trip during
spring vacation.
The Sunland Special will leave
at 5:30 p.m. April 4 from Detroit
and Ft. Lauderdale the following
Friday. Train ticket sales will be-
gin from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Friday
and will continue through March
26 at a cost of $69.50 round trip-
a saving of 20 dollars according to
Bob Golton, '54, Wolverine club
special trips chairman.

Campus
Calendar
EVENTS TODAY
CONFERENCE-Finance experts
and officers from. Michigan cities
will meet today and tomorrow in
the East Conference Room of the
Rackham Bldg. for the second an-
nual Municipal Finance Officers
Training Institute.
ARTS THEATER-G. B. Shaw's
"Mrs. Warren's Profession" will be
discussed tonight at the Arts The-
ater Club after the 8 p.m. perform-
ance. On the panel will be Prof.
Herbert Barrows, of the English
department, Donald Pearce, also
of the English department, and
Prof. Claribel Baird of the speech
department.
FRENCH CLUB -A parody of
"Carmen" will be presented at the
meeting of Le Cercle Francais at
8 p.m. today in the League.
* * *
EVENTS TOMORROW
MARKETING CLUB-Basil Liv-
ingston, instructor in advertising,
will speak to the Student Market-
ing Club on "The Development of
American Markets for European
Products" at 4 p.m. tomorrow in
Rm. 131 of the Business Adminis-
tration Building.
* * *
LECTURE - I. A. Richards,
British philosopher and critic, will
speak on "Literary Analysis" at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
* -*
AESTHETICS-Paul H. Lang,
professor of musicology at Colum-
bia University, will lecture on
"Aesthetics of the Opera," at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in the Rackham
Amphitheater,

Lester Markel, Sunday editor of
the New York Times, will discuss
the challenge to the newspaper in
the sixth in the series of journali-
sm lectures at 3 p.m. today in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Markel, who has served as the
Times' Sunday editor for over 28
years, will develop this idea under
the topic "The Editorial Direction
of the Sunday New York Times."
WHRV To Air
OperaTunes
Advance recordings by the cast
of the Union Opera's all-male mu-
sical, "Never Too Late," will be
premiered on Dick Schuler's disc
jockey show on station WHRV at
12:05 a.m. tomorrow immediately
following The Daily's midnight
newscast.
The recordings, to be released
for public sale late this spring, will
feature four original tunes-"Can't
Imagine," "When I Married You,"
"Promises" and the title tune,
"Never Too Late."
Original music and lyrics for
the show were written by John
Felton, Grad., Pete Katz, '55 SM,
"Red" Johnson, '55, Jim Kemper,
'52 and Paul McDonough, '52 BAd.
On March 23, the show will be
cast on the University Television
Hour.

R

SUNDAY EDITORIALS
'Times' Editor Markel
To Talk to Journalists

IT IS HIS belief that a Sunday
newspaper should give the reader
the background of the news, the
interpretation of the news and the
meaning of the news in a readable
fashion.
As proof of his success the
Sunday edition of the Times
stands as a model for many oth-
er Sunday papers. When Markel
assumed his job in 1923 the Sun-
day staff of the Times numbered
five persons. Today over 90 men
and women are employed with
correspondents in Washington,
London, and Paris.
Besides playing a direct part in
the idea work and editing of each
section of the Sunday edition, Mar-
kel keeps in touch with the rest of
the newspaper world by serving as
an active member of the American
Society of Newspaper Editors.

Rev.'t Hooft
To Lecture
On Religion
The Rev. W.A. Visser 't Hooft,
General Secretary of _ the World
Council of Churches, will be the
third lecturer in the Religion in
Life Series at 8:30 p.m. today at
Rackham Assembly Hall.
Speaking on "Christianity in
This Kind of World," Rev. 't Hooft
will refute the belief, "Christianity
is all right, but 'churchianity' gets
me down."
Since 1924 he has been a lead-
er in the world-wide coopera-
tive movement which resulted in
the formation of the World
Council of Churches.
Because his work takes him in-
to many parts of the world, Rev.
't Hooft is intimately acquainted
with European conditions. He was
one of the leaders in the resistance
of the Dutch Church during World
War IL

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