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March 05, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 1

U

"FABULOUS LOVER':
'Don Giovanni' Opens Today

By ALICE BOGDONOFF
"Don Giovanni," the suave, gus-
ty Don Juan of opera, will carry
on his famous love exploits in the
production of Mozart's work open-
ing at 8 p.m. today in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theater.
Three orchestras, rich orna-
mental costumes, and dramatic
backgrounds will brighten the
stage while members of the music
school sing Mozart's masterpiece.
AS THE introductory music with
its forboding cello strains opens
the opera, Don Giovanni is seen
fleeing from the home of Donna
Anna, who. has refused his amor-
ous advances. To defend his
daughter's honor, Donna Anna's
father, the Commedatore, rushes
out of the house only to be killed
by Giovanni in a duel.
With Mozart's special elo-
quence, -the opera, continues to
sing the story of Giovanni's es-
capades with Zerlina, a peasant
girl, to whom he sings his sed'uc-
tion song. As the superb music
and lively libretto continues,
the fabulous lover becomes in-
volved with Donna Anna, a re-
jected lover, and Don Ottavio,
Donna Anna's fiance who pro-
mises revenge for her father's
death.
With a beauty that not only ex-
cites but terrifies, the opera winds
its way through Don Giovanni's
story until his final downfall when
the Commedatore returns as a
statue to lead the lover -down into
the fiery depths of hell.

* * * s

U' Calendar
Discussed
A t Meetino
(Continued from Page .1)
This, under the proposed revi-
sion, would practically eliminat
the vacation period-at the end of
summer school which the faculty
now enjoys with their families, it
was brought out.
Robbins announced that the
calendar committee, after consid-
eration of the plan, found it would
be virtually impossible to make
the desired changes unless a quar-
ter-system was installed. Such a
system was deemed impractical,
financially .and scholastically.
Other suggestions made includ-
med the creation of two "uneven"
semesters, ending classes before
Christmas but holding examina-
tions after the holiday and limit-
ing the exam period.
A sub-committee has been set
up under the literary conference
steering committee to further in-
vestigate the matter.
illings To Speak
Benson E. Billings, Assistant
Manager of the Market Analysis
Department, Chevrolet Motor Di-j
vision of GMC, will speak on mar-
keting problems of the automobile
industry at 7:30 p.m. today in
Rm. 130 of the Business Admin-
ittration Bldg.
The lecture is being sponsored,
by Delta Sigma Pi Commerce and
Business Adminstration fraternity.

'U'

Students

Work

* *' * *

Graduates Interviewing
Detroit Area Residents
Community Problems Subject of Survey;
Random Sample of Population Taken
By CARA CHERNIAK
For the first time at any university, a full scale sociological survey
is underway, with graduate students taking the role of experts and
learning the inner workings of a survey from the bottom up.
The main purpose of the study, formally called the "Detroit Area
Survey," is to study community problems in the Detroit metropolitan
area.
To do this, about 20 graduate students, directed by Prof. Ronald
Feldman of the sociology department, have been travelling back -and
forth to Detroit where they are interviewing a random sample of about
800 people.
PLANS FOR THE project, however, began quite a while ago, and
work. will continue many months after the actual interviewing has
been completed. The survey will, in fact, be repeated again for several
years to come.
The actual interviewing work is most interesting, students ad-
mit, and lessons in interviewing techniques come in handy, but
unexpected problems occur at the actual Interview and students
have to think fast to solve them.

on

Survey

4

;
1

-Daily-Bruce Knoll
THWARTED LOVE-John Wiles, Grad., in the guise of Don Gio-
vanni, flees from Dorlina Anna, played by Grace Ravesloot, '55M.
Giovanni's servant, Leporella (Dale Thompson, Grad.) looks on
fearfully.

INTERVIEWS ARE INFORMAL, LAST ABOUT AN HOUR

* * *#<
Taking the lead role of Don
Giovanni is John Wiles, Grad. His
servant, Leporella will be sung by
Dale Thompson, Grad. Other
members of the cast are: Suzanne
Hendrian, Grad. as Donna Elyira,
Grace Ravesloot, '55M as Donna
Anna, Frank Porretta '52M as
Don Ottavio, Betty Wiles '52M in
the role of Zerlina, Russell Chris-

* *> *
topher '52M as the Commedatore,
and James Fudge, Grad. as Maset-
to.
Tickets for the opera, which will
run through Saturday may be pur-
chased at the Lydia Mendelssohn
box office. for $1.50, $1.20 and 90
cents. A special student rate is

offered at 75 cents
and Thursday nights.

WednesdayI

I

Union lates
Constitutional
Amendments
(Continued from Page 1)
Moran said that the proposals have
been submitted to the Regents and
will probably be reviewed at their
!*ij meeting.
Although the second and third
amendments would go into effect
this spring if approved by both
students and Regents, the first
change would not be effective
until spring elections in 1953,
Moran said.
In this way results of the im-
pending All-Campus elections will
not be affected at the last minute
by a constitutional change.
If the amendments are ap-
proved, the State of Michigan
Articles of Association making
the Union a non-profit corpora-
tion would also have to be
amended. There would be little
difficulty in this action, Moran
indicated.
The current amendment were
drawn up by a special student con-
stitutional committee formed on
request of the Union Board last
November.
Included on the committee are
Kathe, Moran, Daily managing
editor Chuck Elliott, '52, SC vice-
president Bob Baker, '52, AIM
past-president Dave Ponitz, '52,
IFC president Jack Smart, '52,
Joint Judiciary member Bill Mc-
Intyre, '52, and Union vice-presi-
dent for the combined schools
Gene Mesh, '52BAd.
The most recent attempt to
modify the Union Constitution, in
the spring of 1950, failed when
only 250 Union members showed
up for the constitutional meeting.
Union Changes
Social Dates
Several important Union cal-
endar changes, including a re-
scheduling of IFC Ball, have been
announced by Union councilman
Louis Zako, '53.
Originally planned for May 9,
the Ball will be held on Saturday,
May 17. IFC Sing has been
changed to May 15.
Other changes necessary be-
cause of the new date for IFC
Ball include the South Qud
Spring Formal, to be held on
May 10 instead of May 17 and
the Arts Chorale Spring Con-
cert, moved from May 15 to
May 14.
The Men's Glee Club-concerts
scheduled for March 8 and 14
have been cancelled, Zako said.
The Chicago Symphony orchestra
concert will be Sunday, March 9
instead of March 10.
The Spanish- Club play will be
presented on both March 31 and
April 1 and the East Quad Ball
will be held on May 3 instead o
April 26.
Prof. Eggertseni
Re-elected to Post

OA
*I r1w

" s"
fA

with any other
KING-SIZE cigarette

PROF. FREEDMAN POINTS OUT AREAS WHERE STUDENTS WILL INTERVIEW

"It often involves a lot more
psychology than sociology," one
student laughed.
* . ,
THE FIRST interview is usually
the hardest, most researchers
found, but after that it becomes
much easier. However few came
upon the problem faced by Sid
Belanoff, when he knocked on the
door of his first interviewee.
Belanoff was greeted by an
old man, .who willingly invited
him in. But each and every ques-
tion was answered by a tirade
against President McKinley,
who, the interviewee, insisted,
was responsible for all the coun-
try's problems.
All homes being i#terviewed are
notified beforehand by a letter
describing the Survey and its pur-
poses. Still, however, many people
insist the interviewers are selling
magazines and refuse them ad-
mittance. It takes a competent in-
terviewer to convince them their
identities will be anonymous, and
the questions of a general nature
dealing with community affairs
only.
IN A RANDOM sample only the
home and a particular Individual
may be interviewed. Interviewers
have returned to the same home
six or seven times to get one In-
terview.
Some interviewers are invited to
tea, and even to dinner by friend-
ly interviewees. For the most part,
interviewers report they have been
received well, and questions ans-
wered willingly.
As soon as each one has com-
pleted his assigned number of in-
terviews he will tabulate the re-
sults, and compile them by a
coding process. Interviews will
be over next month, but full re-
sults of the survey will not be
published until next summer.
Even the questions asked will
not be revealed until the inter-
views are over, Prof. Freedman
said. However he did say that in
general the questions cover organ-
izations, political and social, that
the individual belongs to.
Results will be made available to
various organizations in the De-
troit area, including political clubs
which will find it useful in an
election year.
Daily
Photo*
Feature
Pictures by
Alan Reid

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STUDENTS DRIVE TO DETROIT THREE TIMES WEEKLY FOR INTERVIEWS

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* Compare Fatima with any other

RESULTS ARE TABULATED ON COUNTER-SORTER MACHINE

CLASSROOM WORK INCLUDES PRACTICE INTERVIEWING

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