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March 04, 1952 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 1952

I

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Committee
Puts ClampsL
On Speakers
(Continued from Page 1)
lations. Therefore, we did not ins
any manner whatsoever attempt
to sponsor Mr. Green's appear-
ance without University approval,
nor do we intend to do so at any
future date.
"The Civil Liberties Committee,
however, unalterably maintains
its position that a lecture com-
mittee which screens speakers and
speeches has no place on a Uni-
versity campus dedicated to the
pursuit of truth."
ALTHOUGH the CLC's move to
hear Greene came in the midst of
its petitioning campaign to secure
a campus vote on the powers of
the Lecture Committee, Chairman
Dgvra Laudau vehemently denied
that,tblis was a "test case."
Dorothy MacKay, '53, who in-
troduced Greene's name during
a Feb. 14 meeting, said Greene
"has a wealth of information
on problems of the foreign born{
and should be heard."
An attempt was made to have
Greene speak off campus last
night but no meeting place could
be found, according to a spokes-
man for an Ad Hoc Committee for
Free Speech set up when the Lec-
ture Committee's decision became
known. The Allenel Hotel can-
celled a room reservation for the
group yesterday afternoon because
of "insufficient space."
Greene ate dinner at Robert
Owen women's co-op : "as' a
guest of individual people and not
a house guest," according to House
Mother Marjorie Crozier. He
spent the night at the Union.
* * *
LECTURE Committee members
declined to elaborate on their pre-
pared statement.
However, it was clear they
were somewhat critical of the
CLC's failure to mention the
fact Abner -Greene had been
jailed for contempt of Con-
gress in their information brief
to the committee.
It was also evident they were
unhappy about being put on the
"spot" in the midst of the current
Un-American probe and just be-
for ethe State Legislature's deci-
sion on University appropriations,
although it was strongly denied
that such factors were allowed to
influence the decision.
In regard to McPhaul, the
Committee statement read:
"The Committee, on investiga-
tion, is reliably informed that the
proposed speaker is executive sec-
retary of the Michigan Chapter
of the Civil Rights Congress which
has been designated by the Attor-
ney General's office as a Com-
munist " front organization, and
that recently he refused to answer
questions or produce records as
requested by a Committee of Con-
gress which was investigating
Communist activities in Michi-
gan.
Commenting on Greene, the
group said:
"The Committee, on investiga-

M
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AIM Reports
BrightHopes
The Association of Independent
M e n 's Constitutional Revision
ommittee met for the second time
'esterday afternoon and consid-
rable progress was reported by
he group's heat, Bert Braun,''54.
"Although nothing concrete was
decided upon, there was an en-
couraging amount of agreement on
certain proposals, and the outlook
or something definite coming out
of Wednesday's meeting is bright,"
according to Braun.
SDA, SPA Plan
Events for Toda,
The recently revived Students
for Democratic Action will hold its
second meeting at 7:30 p.m. today
in the Union, to discuss amend-
ments to the new constitution and
election of officers.
"Peace Will Win," sponsored by
the Society for Peaceful Alterna-
tives, will be shown at 8 p.m. today
in the-Architecture Auditorium.
Draft Delay Set
Law School graduates who have
been ordered for induction into
the armed services will receive a
temporary postponement until
they have taken their bar exami-
nation, National Selective Service
Headquarters announced.

Case Clubs
To Compete'
Tomorrow
The Case Clubs of the Law
School will hold tf e oral argu-
ments in the semi-final round of
this year's Henry M. Campbell
Competition at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow
in Hutchins Hall.
The case to be argued is built
around the Wage Stabilization
laws and raises interesting ques-
tions of their relation to the con-
stitution, common law, and the
Taft-Hartley Act.
ARGUING IN one case will be
the Champlin Club pitting Albert
L. Feldman, '53L, and Alfred W.
Blumrosen, '53L, against Walter
Flickinger, '53L, and Charlie W.
Wexler, '53L.
The other argument will place
Rogers Club against Woodward
Club. Rogers will be represented
by Robert G. Russell, '53L, and
J. Kirby Hendee, '53L, versus
Alan R.Kidston, 153L, and HY-
man L. Berman, '53L.
Each of these arguments will
be heard by a court composed of
two practicing lawyers in the la-
bor law field and one member of
the Law School faculty. The pub-
lic is cordially invited to attend the
arguments.

SL Inter'est
Plan Made
Women' s Dorms
To Be Represented
A new method of stimulating
interest in elections and bringing
SL closer to the student body is
being worked out by two commit-
tee members.
Janet Netzer, '54 and Lee Fiber,
'54, of the public relations division
of the elections committee, have
asked each of the women's dorms
on Observatory St. to elect a non-
voting SL representative, who will;
act as go-between foi the dorms
and student government.
Originated as a means of in-
teresting students in voting and
petitioning for office, the plan-
ners feel that perhaps it can be
extended to all the dorms on a
permanent basis.
Petitioning for a position of dorm
representative to SL is open to:
any scholastically eligible resident.

-Daily-Al Reid
BLOOD PLEDGE-Don McEwen, '52 BAd, sets an example for
other red-blooded campus males as he receives a blood donor pledge
card from Mrs. Dorothy Legg at the desk in the Administration
Bldg. lobby. The first 50 men to sign up at the desk before 5 p.m.
today will be honored at a party to be given by Chi Omega soror-
ity at '7 p.m. tomorrow.

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
SULTAN AND HIS WORKS
Pakistani Arist Visits
Graduate. Student at 'U',

1111, II

0

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4

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" s

By MURIEL CLAFLIN
"I don't just want to paint; I
want to paint people and man-
kind," Sultan, one of Pakistan's
most promising artists claims.
Sultan, who is visiting with a
fellow countryman here, Hassan
Habib, Grad. ,was chosen to rep-
resent the artists of his country
in a tour of the American Art
Foundations. In his work he por-
trays the international feeling and
good-will that comes from the
mingling of cultures.
* * *
HIS INTEREST WAS in illus-
tion, is reliably informed that the
background of the proposed speak-
er includes prominence in the
Civil Rights Congress, which is
desiganted by the Attorney Gen-
eral's office as a Communist front
organization; that he is executive
secretary of the Committee for the
Protection of the Foreign Born,
also designated as a Communist
front organization; and that, as
trustee of the bailbond fund for
the convicted Communist leaders
he was recently sentenced to six!
months in jail for contempt of
court for refusing to disclose the
bail fund sources."
In both cases, the following
paragraph concluded the Lec-
ture Committee's statement:
"In view of this background the
Committee entertains serious
doubt as to whether the proposed
speaker meets the requirements of
the Regents' rule against subver-
sive speeches, and therefore the
Committee is unable to approve
the petition until sufficient evi-
dence is produced to remove this
doubt."
No definition of "sufficient evi-
dence" was offered.

trating the mutual meeting ground
that could be found among men
through culture and art. With
paints strapped upon his back, and
the few possessions he owned in
a knapsack at his side, he wander-
ed through the country painting
the scenes of rural life.
Kashmir, the Switzerland of
the East, was his particular
pride and joy. It was here that
he spent a great deal of time
recording the customs and hab-
its of the natives.
After studying at the Calcutta
School of Art, he became interest-
ed in teaching children the es-
sentials of painting, for he felt
that in them lay the expectations
of "world rule by human kind-
ness"..*
FOR THIS SAME reason, he
spent several weeks in Vermont,
watching the efforts of the young
children. Throughout the tour, he
stopped at elementary schools
where he took notes of the pro-
cedures used in teaching art to
children.
Traveling with him on this/
tour are two artists who are al-
so from the Far East. Sumardia,
a writer of short stories and
poems attemptedl and succeeded
in translating many of Shake-
speare's poems into Indonesian.
Young Republicans
To Hear Hartley
The Young Republicans will
meet with the Ann Arbor GOP
group at 7:30 p.m. today in the
Council Chamber, City Hall.
Ed Hartley, Detroit GOP worker,
will speak to the group.on party
organization.

I

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4
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.
"p
'X-- G
.

...laundered
to please
the
exacting .. .

FOURTH FOR BRIDGE
Some of the gals were down at a local pub, Charlestoning on the carved table tops.
Most of the others were having a divine time dancing with their classmates at Senior Ball.
But, once again, through the house resounded the loathsome trio's usual cry: fourth
for bridge.
In their four years at Michigan, these three had run through every grand slam
combination, every finesse, and every bid. But there was one bid they had wanted more
than any other-a bid to Once Upon A Time. It never came.
They could not find a fourth that March 15 evening, so they played dummy-bid
instead. But each time they trumped and no-trumped, made book and went down, their
thoughts were blocks away-in the Union Ballroom.
Girls, don't let such a catastrophe happen to you. Tie them, rope them, ask them
(it's Leap Year), but get them to take you to Senior Ball. Don't sit home on March 15,
like the horrible three, when a lent term paper or a shy seductive glance might win
you one heart instead of a four hearts contract. Get to Once Upon A Time, somehow,
and we'll take care of the rest. The perfect dance, the perfect time, tie perfect evening
can all be yours for a $2.50 ticket to Senior Ball.
SENIOR BAL L(ONCE UPON A TIME) MARCH 15
,ckets On Salt 1-5 Weekdays at The Administration Building

x- ,

r.

KYER MODEL LAUNDRY
627 South Main 1215 South University
Phone 3-4185

814 South State

121 East Liberty

II 'Elhv ____________________________

,.

CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMETRY
(Nationally Accredited)
An outstanding college serving
a splendid profession.
Doctor of Optometry degree in
three years for students enter-
ing vWith sixty or (more semester
credits in specified Liberal Arts
courses.
FALL REGISTRATION
NOW OPEN
Students are granted profes-
sional recognition by the U. S.
Department of Defense and
Selective Service.
Excellent clinical facilities.
Athletic and recreational activi-
ties. Dormitories on the campus.
CHICAGO COLLEGE OF
OPTOMETRY
350 Belden Avenue
Chicago 14, Illinois

I II

t-
' el
The whole campus buzzed at
the request for inales to date.
Proof enough that everyone reads:
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
TRY THEM!.

,.

I

I

I Jiueei e~ II ii

Pleasure,

die sov'reign
humankind

i,4

of

Alexander Pope,
January and May

c 1
s-I

To quiet thinking or quick action,
ice-cold Coca-Cola brings the
pleasure of real refreshment.

ahlate li4

f

CHESTERFIELDS are
much MILDER and give you

a,

r F

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