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March 02, 1952 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIC'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 1952

_____________________________________________________________________ i

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Minnesota ADA Offers,
11/ r t , 1 r ll h TN ~ (1 >fl3 t

ITJAA.AU flly eI~i
By DONNA HENDLEMAN
Sen. Joseph McCarthy, ranting
Wisconsin Congressman, has been
the inspiration for a special short
lecture course now in session at
the University of Minnesota.
Entitled, "McCarthyism, a Short
tourse," the series of three lec-
turesis being sponsored by the
Studentsfor Democratic Action in
order to "prepare Minnesota stu-
dents for a forthcoming McCarthy
appearance on campus."
The. first lecture, "The McCar-
thy Record" was delivered last
week. Talks on "The Psychopath-
ology of McCarthyism" and "How
to Listen to McCarthy: Logic and
Semantics" are scheduled this
week. The course is being deliv-
ered by members of the University
faculty.
Also at Wisconsin, the campus
chapter of the National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Col-
ored People reported Friday that
17 out of 25 unorganized men's
houses practice discrimination
against Negroes, then turned
their findings' over to the uni-
versity Committee on Human
Rights.
At Harvard two freshmen were
put on probation last week for

burning a cross in the Harvard
Yard on February 5.
University officials declared
they were satisfied "this deplor-
able incident was not intended
as a demonstration of racial or
religious animosity."
Out West, students at the Uni-
versity of California at Berkeley
are circulating a protest petition
against the appointment of a fac-
ulty advisor for the student news-
paper, The Daily Californian. The
university administration slapped
an advisor on the independent pa-
per last January, after the paper
printed some allegedly "pro-Com-
munist" articles.
Lightest news of the week came
out of Yale, where an indignant
dean of the Yale literary college
demanded that teachers crack
down on "disorderly" student be-
havior in classrooms.
"Smoking has been tolerated in
lecture and recitation rooms, stu-
dents have been allowed to read
newspapers during class, and
sometimes they even assume such
undignified positions as putting
their feet up on other seats. These
things must be stopped," the dean
declared.

,i

I

W-W arnerette
StaUToGide

Ta ent Show
To Kickoff
Blood Drive
Former President Alexander G.
Ruthven will have a "featured
part" in the. "Pint Size Revue,"
an all-campus talent show to be
held at 8 p.m. Thursday in Hill
Auditorium, Joseph H. Fee, assist-
ant dean of students, announced
yesterday.
Outstanding campus talent is
being selected to take part in the
streamlined show which is being
staged as a send-off to the "Beat
Texas U" blood drive, March 10
to 21.
* * *
PATRICIA SKINNER, '52, star
of the recent Student Players' pro-
duction "Joan of Lorraine," will
present a dramatic selection and
will also appear in a dance act
with Phoebe McLean, '54.
Vocal selections by "Gulan-
tics" participant Robin Renfrew
will be included in the show.
Steve Filipiak of radio station
WHRV will act as emcee. The
bands of Bob Leopold, 152, and
Bob Elliott, '52M, will be fea-
tured in a special musical rou-
tine.
The Fiji Marching Band of Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity will lead
a parade tirough campus to the
revue. As part of the program,
awards will be made to organized
campus groups reporting the larg-
est number of pledge cards turned
in.
Editor Blasts
Broadcast Ban
On Hearings
Centuries-old principles of An-
glo-American law were resurrected
in support of the recent TV and
radio ban of the House Un-Ameri-
can Investigating Committee hear-
ings by a well-known legal author-
ity.
An editorial in the Journal of
American Judicature Society, writ-
ten by editor Glenn R. Winters,
declared that the purpose of grand
fury secrecy, "jealously guarded by
Anglo-American law," is to pro-
tect the reputations of the witness-
es who may be innocent.
* * *
"THE SPECTACLE of witness
after witness being skillfully and
relentlessly questioned about sus-
pected criminal activities, in a
crowded auditorium before micro-
phone and camera, is something
to give pause to every person who
holds Americanism dear," he said.
"To say that these risks to the
individual must be subordinated
to the greater importance of edu-
cating the public is only to fall
for the totalitarian doctrine that
the state is more important than
the individual," the editorial
continued.
"When committees are investi-
gating the commission of crimes,
they ought to have no more power
over their witnesses than any
criminal investigating body," the
editor concluded.,

I

By The Associated Press
Puerto Ricans will decide to-
morrow whether they want more
power for their government-al-
ternately blasted as a "dictator-
ship" and defended as democratic'
and progressive.
Up for referendum tomorrow is
a new constitution recently ap-
proved by a constituent assembly.
It will let Puerto Ricans run their
local affairs without interference
by the U.S. It will also put the
spotlight on Gov. Luis Munoz
Marin, one of the most controver-
sial figures the island has had
since Ponce de Leon.
CARRYING OUT Munoz Marin's
view that the island should con-
tinue strong ties with the U.S., but
shouldhave more local autonomy,
the new constitution refers to
Puerto Rico as a "commonwealth"
APO's Launch
am pus Ugly
'Man' Contest
Wanted: the ugliest "man" on
campus.
Alpha Phi Omega service fra-
ternity is sponsoring a contest this
month and next to find the uglies
man-or at least the ugliest mask.
* * *
FOR HUMANITARIAN reasons,
and also to avoid sadism, the
APO's are asking the competing
house groups to submit masks
rather than flesh and blood models.
This method also insures partici-
pation of groups Vnable to decide
on their ugliest man.
Any campus men's unit is
eligible to submit a mask. Blown
up prints of the mask will be
displayed on the diag for all-
campus voting to determine the
winner. The total amount of
contributions dropped in jars be-
low the pictures will select the
ugliest man.
Women, probably the best judge
of ugly males, will enter the con-
test by serving as co-sponsors of
a mask. Each women's group that
enters will be paired with a men's
organization in campaigning for
and constructing the entry. The
entry deadline of the contest is
March 15.
L. . &A.:
Scholarships
To BeGiven
Students with above average
scholastic records and who are in
financial need may apply for the
literary college scholarships from
March 5 to 21 in Rm. 1010 Angell
Hall, Prof. Vincent A. Scanio of
the Romance Languages depart-
ment announced yesterday.
Prof. Scanio, chairman of the
scholarship board, said that the
grants. are being made "to lighten
the load for students who must
work an excessive number of- hours,
impairing their health or academic
standing."

and "within our union with the
United States of America." This
means neither statehood nor in-
dependence.
The fate of the constitution
is being decided amid charges
that the present island govern-
ment is in strange contrast to
democracy in the mainland
United States.
The governor has guided an in-
tensive industrialization program
to raise the low living standards
of the overcrowded island, whose
cities contrast ultra-modern build-
ings and some of the world's most
squalid slums.

UNDISPUTED boss of his party
and hence dominant in both leg-
islative and administrative fields,
Gov. Munoz Marin long has been
accused by political foes of run-
ning a one-man government.
In Puerto Rico, three vociferous
groups oppose him. The smallest,
the nationalists, want indepen-
dence and have resorted to revolu-
tion and riot-and an attempt to
assassinate President Truman last
October. The Independence party
wants the island to become the Re-
public of Puerto Rico, but by peace-
ful means. The Statehood party
wants what its name implies.

-.
i

Puerto Rican Elections Slated

"Business Theory for Secretar-
ies," offered by the University ex-
tension service, will hold its first
meeting at 7 p.m. tomorrow in
Hemer To Speak
Prof. Charles F. Remer of the
economics department will speak
on "Japanese Views on Economic
Development" at an Economics
Club meeting at 8 p.m. tomorrow
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
The meeting is open to all in-
terested students.

r

,N

Our
SPORTSWEAR DEPARTMENT
Replete with hundreds of
Beautiful things for Spring...
BLOUSES.. . $3.95 to $10.95
SK I RTS ... $5.95 to $12.95
RAINCOATS... $25.00 to $29.50
(matched sets)
COTTON DRESSES ... $8.95 to $12.95
SWEATERS.. . $4.95 to $8.95

BUSINESS THEORY:
Secretarial Course To Begin

-4
x.

(-.

Rm. 267, Business Administration
Bldg.
Open to all secretaries interest-
ed, the twelve-week course will
present the fundamentals of ac-
counting, business law, economics,
finance and banking, office man-
agement and interpretive 'statis-
tics.
The registration fee of $15 may
be paid in the classroom during
the half hour preceding the first
class.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

W Arthur

BLAZER JACKETS ...$10.95
Wool - Linen

to $21 .ยง5

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~~-U

S
r'tIi~"r

Hug-high
soft knit!
All elastic two - way
stretch Warnerette .. .
with Warner's famous
2-inch Sta-Up-Top
waist-whittler. Comes
in a matching pantie
girdle. White.
5.95
I Nickels Arcade
Ph. 2-2914

As Advertised in
"CHARM"
McARTRUR'S
QUAINT CALICO
QUILTIE-SET
HAS 00-LA-LA
CONTOURS!
Come-hither sleeveless top,
smooth as though poured on,
paired off with a great, wide,
wonderful quilted skirt. Best
buy a girl could make to in-
sure a gay whirl. Red, gold,
or turquoise posies on dark
grounds. Sizes 10 to 18, and
9 to 15i
9 Nickels Arcade
217 S. Main

GOOD TIME TO SHOP
SELECTIONS ARE COMPLETE
The P ILYN Shorre
529-531 E. Liberty S. Michigan Theatre Bldg.

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II(I,- n rsnrnammanrxmm nnrn~rerjI
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_________________________________________I'

4'

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5 E!

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BELTS
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Regularly 2.50
Five excitingly different belt styles
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And, you'll save on our special pur-
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red, kelly, turf, navy, gold, or
coral.

America's Favorite
Dress Flats
~b "
by GO L O
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our sparkling
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fresh in styling and color
HERE AT LAST... THE SMART SUITS
JAUNTY COATS ... DELIGHTFUL
DRESSES . . . FLOWER STREWN BON-
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FOR EASTER PARADING.
DRESSES and SUIT DRESSES and en-
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and shontungs from $22.95.
Nylons - rayon- crepes and prints
from $10.95.
. (1U

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from $49.95

wool suits

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Blue Suede

LOVELY wool like rayons from
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COATS go to all lengths. Brief
shorties from $29.99 to hand-
some pendulum from $45.00.
HATS desianed to flatter you.

-,

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,.&I I

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-P "IN

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