100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 01, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1952-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATRTDAY, MARCH 1, 1952

NATIONAL ANALYSIS: FACULTY INVOLVED:
Students Endorse New NAM Magazine Strong KKK Group
By HARRY LUNN - - -* Once Found on Campus
I ~'*'V3'

.
IN
b
R to^, g r
a s



I

By DIANE DECKER
"Yes, I am a member of the Ku
Klux Klan," the faculty member
readily admitted, as he sat poised
in his University Hall office, "but
I wish you'd withhold my name."
A scene from some southern
campus? No, this was at the Uni-
versity of Michigan in the fall of
1921.
DENYING THAT the members
of the Klan were obliged to take
fearsome oaths, or that they were
compelled to do. whatever they
were commanded to do by high
officials of the order, the name-
less professor continued, "As I
understand it, the Klan is an or-
ganization of true American men,
who want the laws of America to
express the true fundamental
principles and to enforce these
laws strictly and without fear or
favor."
The professor was not the
only upholder of the Klan in
Ann Arbor. Three other' promi-
nent members of the faculty,
secretly confided to a Daily re-

porter that they were members
of the Klan.
. Each of the faculty men placed
the lowest number of Klansmen
in the area at 50. Another Daily
source placed the figure closer to
200.
Tracing the. origin of the Klan
on the Michigan campus, a mem-
ber of the organization reported
that Klansmen, among them an
alumnus, had come to the Univer-
sity during 'the preceding winter
and spring and "quietly, effec-
tively, built a powerful organiza-
tion.' * *
VARIOUS COMMENTS were
made about the chalk "KKK's"
which then appeared periodically
on walks. But, the Daily theorized,
"Small boys like to make chalk
marks. KKK in an attractive
combination to letter."
Even in 1921, there was opposi-
tion to the Ku Klux Klan. In an
article appearing in the Detroit
Free Press, Dean Henry M. Bates
of the Law School made an elo-
quent appeal against the Klan,
which was nationally reprinted.
The New York World, credited
with the origin of the campaign
against the Klan, wired him to
compliment him on "the best
interview against the Klan that
we have seen."
Prof. Ulrich B. Phillips of the
history department commented,
"An organization which deems it
necessary to exist in secret has no
reason for existing except in ex-
traordinary times."

I

-Daily-Malcolm Shatg
MAKE IT PRETTY-Pledges of the Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity turned the dogs out of their
kennels at the Washtenaw County Humane Society yesterday so they could clean and paint the place
as part of the "Help Week" campaign. Over twenty fraternities have already or plan to participate
in the drive.

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
CONTENTED CAPITALISTS-Neale Traves, '52, left, and Jay
Strickler, '54 happily scan the first issue of "U.S.A.," a new
publication of the National Association of Manufacturers, which
made its national debut yesterday morning.

y

noon, and another having sold
only one by that time.
Meanwhile, Traves, Strickler
and other interested campus en-
trepeneurs busily read through
their handsome first editions and
expectantly awaited subsequent
issues.

Union Dance
Soft lights and the music of
Clare Sheppard's band will lend
atmosphere for the Union mem-
bership dance from 9 to 12 to-
night in the Union ballroom.
Sheppard promises the latest
hit tunes will be in his reper-
toire.

Faculty Discusses Good Teaching Qualities

"What makes good college teach-
ing?"
Five faculty members, chosen
for their reputation as superior
instructors, attempted to answer
this question yesterday at a forum
in the Rackham Amphitheater.
PROF. CLAYTON HILL, of the
business administration school
opened the discussion, which cen-
tered around the formulation of
a list of qualifications for college
teachers, by stressing that as-
signments should allow the stu-
dent to g'et practice - and exper-
ience in thinking for himself.

Careful organization and prep-
aration of material for each,
class meeting was cited as an-
other important item for teach-
ing, by Prof. Sidney Fine of the
history department.
A third point presented was that
the instructor should be friendly,
democratic, tolerant, and helpful
in relation with his students. Prof.
Hazel Losh of the astronomy de-
partment, suggested that ap-
proachability be added to this list.
Hav1i1g sent three sons to the
University, Prof. Walter Sadler, of
the civil engineering department

felt he understood "the difficul
ties most often met by college
students in their work." The prime
problem, he felt, was the amount
of homework,
An additional quality was men-
tioned by Prof. Frank X. Braun of
the German department who-
pointed out that teachers should
have high ideals.
Prof. Algo D. Henderson of the
civil engineering department acted
as chairman and moderator of the
forum, which was the first in a
series of five on College and Uni-
versity Teaching.

Winning

Pictures

f

r

i.

r

... -

i

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-Christ Jesus.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased. .
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:3-0.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN,
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets

CHURCH

a

CONTEST WINNER: Loren Schmid, grand priz e winner of the recent Union all-campus photogra-
phy contest, views the other pictures that will be included in the contest showing tomorrow at the
Union. The winter scene of the diagonal at night brought to Schmid the first place award in the
still life class as well as grand prize winner of the entire contest.
* . * . * *

ti
1
r
r
1
7

Union To Show Winning Photos
Winning entries from the first Charles Laughton's chuckle
annual Union photography contest snapped by Daily photographer,
will go on display tomorrow for AlanReid, 52NR, brought Reid the
a one-week showing in the Union. first prize in the adults and young
The exhibit will include shots people division of the contest.
taken by winners in the three A picture of a little puppy mak-
classes of the contest: animals, ing like a kangaroo copped the
still life and scenes, and adults first prize in the animal class for
and young people. 'Ensian photographer George Ben-
A still life scene of the diagonal isek, '52.
in winter copped the first place Entries in the photo contest
prize in that class for photo- which are not in the showing may
grapher Loren Schmid, '53, and be picked up from 3 to 5 p.m. daily
also the grand prize for the entire next week at the student offices
+..'J1 + in the Union.

17

it

1!,

SPORTSMAN'S

I-, ; i

11

colltieaL.

' Al tU1G V 1V1.

1 1
IT'S EASY TO BANK-BY-MAIL
. and so convenient. Your bank is as near
as your railbox. Avoid the traffic, parking
worries, and standing in line during busy bank-
ing hours. Ask about our Bank-by-Mail serv-
ice the next time
you're in.

C H OICE!
OMEGA
SEAM AS TER
Smiles at the. roughest treatment!
Water and shock-resistant, anti.
magnetic...fitted with the world
famous Omega automatic move-
ment that winds itself. Your first
choice for good looks, accuracy and j
dependability!
The Omega Seamaster, in lapped

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Veruin.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erlond J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.: Breakfast Seminar. Pine Room.
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "The Sin of Secularism,"
Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Wesley
Lounge. Dr. DeWitt Baldwin will speak on
"Can We Expect An Integrated Education."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily!
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: -Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill & Forest Ave. Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:20 A.M.: Bible Study at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Trinity Church-10:45 Zion Church.
5:30 P.M.: Supper Meeting-Program at 7:00.

Rev. Joseph M. Smith, 1 ir _r
Director Student Work, H. L. Pickerill, Mari-
lynn Paterson
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School, Junior High - Adults.
10:45 A.M.: Church School, Nursery to 6th Grade.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "New
Life in Lost Causes."
5:00 P.M.: Lenten Vespers. Dr. Samuel Harri-
son, Pres. Adrian College, Guest Speaker.
Student Guild: Meet at Congregational Church.
6:00 supper for new supper co-op. 7:00 pro-
gram for all Guilders. Grey ustin, Lane Hall
program assistant, will lead discussion on "is
God Necessary?"
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Director of Music, Wayne Dunlop; Organist,
Howard R. Chase.
10:45 A.M.: All Departments of Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr will give
the first of a series of Lenten Sermons on
"Superlative Things." His subject will be "The
Greatest Opportunity in History."
The Student Guild will meet in the church at 6:00
P.M. At 700 P.M. all Guilders and guests will
meet for a program. Rev. Grey Austin, new
program assistant at Lane Hall, will lead dis-
cussion on "Is God Necessary?"
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "Christianity in Marriage."
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper-Program. Candlelight Ceremony
to Initiate New Members.
Wednesday at 7:30: Lenten Vesper Service.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student Counselor
Betty Lou Jockwig, Associate Student Counselor
10:00 A.M.: Bible Class. "The Lord's Prayer.
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship. Sermon Topic--
"I sa iah."
6:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild.
"The Signicance of a Belief in God."
Prof% Edmund Wooding of the Journalism Dept.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETINGLane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine

Al-

f

~~1

1

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue.
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Phares Steiner, 'Organist
10:00 A.M.: Adult Group-Summary Discussion.
"U.S. Aid to India, its manner and effects."
11:00 A.M.: Sermon: "On Keeping Lent Signifi-
cantly."
7:00 P.M.: Students at Lane Hall-"Islam--
What 250,000,000 people believe"-Noeen

4

LAUGHTON'S CHUCKLE TAKES FIRST PLACE PRIZE
~ ~

The Reverend Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koonz, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain

1 1

11

ll

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan