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October 03, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-10-03

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'AGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ED iESDAY, UC7'bBER , 19 i1

a

'U'NearEastArchaeo logical Expedition R

eturns

Came on Says Im ressions
By ZANDER HOLLANDER
Two stale smelling, dirty looking scrolls, covered with pimple-like
bumps were the focus of attention yesterday as Prof.-George G. Cam-
eron unveiled the tangible results of the University's Near East Ex-
pedition.
But Prof. Cameron was jubilant as he described the seven-foot
long, rubbery parchment from the new "rosetta stone'' which is re-
garded as one of the most important archaeological finds in recent
years,
"These impressions, taken from a granite monument in the Ke-
lishin mountain pass in northern Kurdistan," the leader of the eight-
man party explained, "will provide a key to the lost language of
Urartu or Ararat."
To get the 2900 year old inscriptions, the archaeologist and his

University colleagues, traversed

six-

U 'Press Club
Meetings Will
pen Friday
A discussion of "Polls, Politics
and People" by University Survey
Research Center members - the
group who made no mistake on
the 1948 election-will be one of
the highlights of the 34th Annual
meeting of the University Press
Club scheduled for Friday and
Saturday.
Glenn MacDonald, editor of the
Bay City Times and vice president
of the club, will preside over an
informal discussion period set for
10:30 a.m. Friday.
Friday's luncheon feature will
be reports from University foreign
students on Press Club Journalism
Fellowships. The luncheon, sched-
uled from noon until 2:30 p.m.
will be followed by the discussion,
"Polls, Politics and People'' from
3 to 5 p.m. in the Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
University President Harlan
Hatcher will appear before the
Press Club at a dinner meeting at
7 p.m. in Rm. 3R of the Union.
A business session will be held
at 10 a.m. Saturday followed by
a luncheon. Later the Board in
Control of Intercollegiate Athle-
tics will act as host to club mem-
bers at the Michigan-Stanford
football game.

-foot snows, climbed an 11,000 foot
mountain, s u r v i v e d explosions,
rockslides and pneumonia and
fought a diplomatic battle which
is still going on.
* * *

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2 -. (Continued . from.Pge y

* * *

* * *

* * *

THE INSCRIPTION was made
on one side of the stone in the
Assyrian language and on the
other in the language of the
Urartu people. The professor said
that it is these Urartu writings
that are expected to throw light
on the origin of the Medes and
the Persians.
Both Iraq and Iran claimed
the territory in which the
monument stands and for a
while it looked as though Iran
would not give the University
party the right to explore.
Finally, in desperation, Prof.
Cameron appealed to the Shah of
Iran, who visited the University
two years ago. Permission was
quickly granted.
* .:.*
YESTERDAY. b a c k in this
country for little more than a
week, the tall, slim (he lost forty
pounds on the expedition) archae-
ologist summed up his journey to
craggy, rugged mountains between
Iraq and Iran.
"It was worth it," he said
quietly.
The language of Urartu, Prof.
Cameron believes, will give part
of the answer to questions which
have long baffled historians--
"Who were the Medes and Per-
sians and where did they come
from?"
* * *
BUT WHETHER the inscrip-
tions live up to Prof. Cameron's
hopes or not he -feels that the
more important aspect of the ex-
pedition was the whole concept
of the journey.
"In every sense of the word,"
he said, "it was a pioneering
job that we did."
Never before had a group of
scholars, working independently
in their own fields been sent out
on a mission like this he ex-
plained.
* * *
THE EXPEDITION included
Prof. Douglas Crary, a geographer,
Prof. N. Marbury Efimenco, a
political scientist and graduate
students William Masters, Ernest
McCarus, Carter Zeleznik, and
John Andersen. Archaeologist
Ralph Solecki, of the Smithsonian
Institution, was also a member of
the group.
Later members of the party
made side trips to oil fields in
Basra, Kirkuk, and Kuwait. Ge-
ographer Crary lived for several
weeks among an obscure tribe of
Arabs who inhabit the Tigris-
Euphrates swamp region.
Try FOL LETT'S First

CENTER OF ATTENTION-Another Urartu monument discovered by the expedition is painted with
a rubber latex compound which hardens to record a permanent impression.

TO OPEN SERIES:

First Concert Will Star
Victoria De Los Angeles

FBI Investigates
Draft Violators
Violators of the Selective Service
Act of 1948 are now being investi-
gated, according to J. A. Robey of
the Detroit office of the Federal
Bureau of Investigation.
According to Edward T. Kane,
Detroit U. S. Attorney, violation of
the act carries a maximum penal-
ty of imprisonment for five years
and fine of $10,000 or both.

LOOK INTO HISTORY-Thomas Cameron, son of the leader
of the expedition, stands above a Persian tomb, carved into the
solid rock of a mountain pass in northeast Iraq.

DEBATING more general prob-
lems, the delegates passed a reso-
lution in favor of universal mili-
tary training at this time, al-
though a minority report was filed
because of the close vote.
The congress also discussed
college atpletics and urged that
they be "returned to the stu-
dents," demanding that "inter-
collegiate sports be both de-
commercialized and de-empha-
sized."
The international importance of
strong active student governments
in the United States was empha-
sized by main speaker, Harold
Stassen, president of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania. Stassen
stressed the necessity of being
aware of the problems of students
in other countries to help prevent
major world conflicts in future
years.
Although the University SL has
been a member of the congress for
the past four years, the question
of whether or not membership will
be retained for another year is
voted on each fall.
Wilcox pointed out that the na-
tional positions held by Univer-
sity members on the congress at
this time do not bind the SL to
continue membership.

With a program featuring early
Italian, German, French a n d
Spanish songs, soprano star Vic-'
toria de los Angeles will open the'
Choral Union Concert Series at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow, at Hill Audi--
torium.
In her recital Miss de los Ange-
les will include "Recitative and
Aria of Messagera" from the op-
era "Orpheus" by Monteverdi,
"Der Nussbaum" and "Widmung"
by Schumann, "Nell'" and "En
Priere" by Faure, "Le Roi de
Thule" and "Jewel Song" from
the opera Faust by Gounod, "Jota
Castellana" by Guridi and "Jota"
by de Falla.
* * *
AFTER A successful debut in
Carnegie Hall, Miss.de los Angeles
was brought back to the famous
hall by popular demand for two
more concerts within the follow-
ing six months.
The Spanish-born star is al-
ready recognized as one of the
leading singers of the day. She
has obtained for herself a top-
notch reputation in both the
concert and opera fields.
Miss de los Angeles made her
Metropolitan debut last March,

and has recently returned from
an extensive tour of the festivals
of Britain; Holland, Lyons and
Edinburgh and a series of sold-out
performances at London's Royal
Opera.
i,--- -=- - --- _---

'ENSIAN

t

CAMPUS SALE

it
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4

TODAY

-

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CULTURAL CLUBS WANTED:

TO
STUDENTS'
WIVES
If you are a
formzer
TELEPHOrNE
OPERATOR
and would like to work
while your husband
attends the University,
cone in and see us.
MICHIGAN
BELL
TELEPHONE
CO.
Mrs. Pesek
323 East Washington St.
Ann Arbor

New Members Sought by
International Student Group

8-5

a: 1

v
S

More representatives from for-
eign and American cultural group:
on cami us are needed if the Inter-
national Students' Association is
to become a, co-ordinating agency
for all such groups, according to
Charles Arnade, grad., president
of the association.
Although over fourteen foreign
student:' clubs and , everal other
c4 n.pu , cganizations sent rere.-
sentatixes to the TSA meeting
Arts Theatre
O ens Doors
Opei:ing night for the Arts The-
atre G ub's fall season isn't unvil
Oct. 19. but three of the club's
new ri.eirbers will give their first
performarces in the a'"ena theatre
'Friday night.
Roain Good, Paula Karell, and
Bob Larir.g are scheduled to en-
tertain guests at the group's open
house, to be held at 8:30 p.m. Fri-
day at 209'/% E. Washington, with
satiric skits presented in a burles-
que style. Dana Elcar, former act-
or, will also paiticipate in ihe
skits.
The oraln house is being held
to introduce the cast, particularly
the new members, to anyone inter-
ested in the Arts Theatre's work.
Refreshments will be provided,
and guests will be invited to par"-
ticipate in folk-singing led by Ade-
le Hager.t

i

Monday, Arnade believes that the
group will not be truly representa-
tive until all groups of interna-
tional interest become associated
with ISA by sending delegates...
The main event of the year will
be the annual International Ball,
an all campus affair, which was
extremely successful last year, Ar-
nade said. Also during Interna-
tional Week, held each year, the
International Pageant, a panor-
ama of world culture will be pre-
sented.
Officers elected by the group
Monday night are: Naeem Gul
Rathore, vice-president; Frank F.
Reed, recording secretary; Erika
Fritzen, corresponding secretary,
and George B. Zotiades, treasurer.
Soph ab Casting
Continues today

on the diagonal

l

AA Orchestra
Seeks Tryouts
Final auditions for the Ann Ar-
bor ivic Symphony Orchestra will
be held tomorrow and Friday
nights at Anhi Arbor High SchooL.
The auditions will be conducted
by Orien Dalley of the School of
Music and Extension Division, who
will conduct the orchestra. Play-
ers of orchestral instruments who
are interested in auditioning may
call 5457 for an appointment, Dal-
ley said.'
The crchestra will give two edu-
catiqnai programs for children,
two evening out-of-toarn concerts,
and teir annual spring concert
here.

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t

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Preliminary tryouts for 'Soph
Cab will continue from 2 to 5 p.m.
today and from 7 to 9 tonight.
The cast will include singing
and dancing choruses as well as
solos and speaking parts, accord-
ing to Sue Nasset, '54, floorshow
chairman. She emphasized that
previous experience was unneces-
sary.
Rooms for tryouts will be post-
ed on the League bulletin board.
Read Daily Classifieds

RECORD HAVEN STORES
(Dept..C)}
520 W. 48th St.,
New York 19, N. Y.
If in N. Y. C. visit our Midtown
stores: 1125 6th Ave.; 1145 6th
Ave.; 1211 6th Ave.

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