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September 30, 1951 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1951

COLLEGE ROUNDUP: I .g.-

I

Bias, ed, Red Worries
Beset Nation's Colleges

=

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a1

By HARLAND BRITZ
Squabbles over discriminating'
fraternities, maid service, and col-
lege Communists livened up the
routine of registration on the col-.
lege front this week.
Failing to get their national or-
ganizations to drop discriminatory
clauses from their constitutions,
four fraternities at the University
of Connecticut dissolved their na-
tional ties.
THE FOUR, Lambda Chi Alpha,
Sigma Chi, Kappa Sigma and Sig-
ma Nu acted after an anti-discri-
mination proclamation was issued
on the Connecticut campus,
The proclamation, which was
passed by student referendum two
Deadline Set
For Fib right
tu . 'a11t
StudyGrants
Applications for the 1952-53 Ful-
~bight awards for study abroad are
due Oct. 15, according to the scho-
larships division of the graduate
school.
Under the award program, now
in its third year, more than 700
awards ford21 countries are avail-
able. Sponsored by the State De-
partment, the program offers op-
portunities in the field of grad-
uate study, teaching and research.
The awards generally cover
roundtrip travel expenses and
funds in foreign currency for tui-
tion, books and other living ex-
penses.
The four basic qualifications for
eligibility are United States citi-
zenship, a college degree or its
equivalent at the time the award
is to be taken up, knowledge of the
language of the country sufficient
to carry on the proposed study, and
good health.
Countries for which the Ful-
bright awards are available are:
Australia, Austria, Belgium, Lux-
embourg, Burma, Egypt, France,
Greece, India, Iran, Italy, Nether-
lands, - New Zealand, Norway,
Philippines, Thailand, Turkey,
United Kingdom, Denmark, Iraq
and Japan.
Post-doctorate students who are
interested in university teaching,
lecturing, or advanced research
may apply at the Conference
Board of Associated Research
Councils, 2101 Cdnstitution Ave-
nue, Washington 25, D. C.

years ago, had specified September,
1951, as the deadline for removal
of the bias clauses.
In another part of Connecticut,
Yalemen caused a fuss after being
forced to make their own beds.
Accustomed to more leisure,
the Elis were generally irate af-
ter an administration order re-
voked maid service. Immediately
plans were made for an inde-
pendent maid service, but the
idea was frustrated when the
Council of Associated Student
Agencies turned thumbs down.
One proposal to hire students to
do the actual cleaning failed be-
cause it carried social implications
the were considered undesirable.
University regulations specifically
forbid one student to act as an-
other's personal servant.
REPORTING THAT a govern-
ment investigation will soon begin
on their campus, the University of
Chicago Maroon noted that the
school has an interesting, history of
anti-Communist probes.
The newest accusations were
levelled by an Illinois Congress-
man, Rep. Harald H. Velcie.
In a television pr'ogram early
in the month, Rep. Velde men-
tioned that "any thorough in-
vestigation of Communism in
this area (Chicago) will reach
the University.of Chicago."
The immediate reaction of the
University's chancellor to the news
was reported as a bored, "Here we
go again."
THE ONLYevidence Rep. Velde
revealed was a notice from the
University's bulletin board an-
nouncing a lecture on "Should a
Communist teach?" One of the
speakers was going to answer in
the affirmative.
Burkhardt Named
AssistantChaplain
Father Edward Burkhardt was
recently appointed by Edward
Cardinal Mooney, Archbishop of
Detroit, to serve as assistant stu-
dent chaplain of Saint Mary
Chapel.
Father Burkhardt succeeds Fa-
ther John Bradley, who has left
for Italy to do graduate study in
philosophy at the Angelicum Uni-
versity in Rome.
A graduate of the Sacred Heart
Seminary, Father Burkhardt, 29-
year-old native of Detroit, served
at Saint Vincent de Paul Parish
in Detroit before coming to Ann
Arbor.

..

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
OLDHAM CARRIES-Don Oldham (14), Michigan's new left halfback, is shown carrying the ball for one of the few Wolverine gains
in yesterday's game against MSC. Ralph Stribe (75), the only other identifiable player, is shown coming up from his tackle's position.
--

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Hollywood Stars Feed
Fuel to Grid Argument

By GAYLE GREENE
Hollywood's attempt to expose
bigtime college football arrived in
Ann Arbor yesterday only a few
days after Allen Jackson's Atlan-
tic Monthly indictment of the sport
as run at Michigan.
The film's two stars, John Derek
and Donna Reed, in Ann Arbor
yesterday to promote the picture,
"Saturday's Hero," added their
comment to the growing tirade
against overemphasis of athletics.
"I HAVEN'T read Jackson's ar-
ticle," Derek explained, "but I have
heard a great deal of comment
about it. I think it goes right
along with what the picture is
trying to bring out; that there
just isn't enough room for big-
time footbhfll and a satisfying edu-
cation."
Derek, who attended the
Michigan-MSC game with Miss
Reed and Broderick Crawford,
who flew in from Kansas City
just for this annual gridiron
clash, applied this theory to the
game he had just witnessed a
few minutes before the inter-
view.
"With a complete new squad go-
ing into play for each type of
action and hours of practice and

memorization of plays, how can a
football player devote himself to
studies and at. the same time re-
member what his part in play
number 23 is, before some big guy
walks all over him."
WHAT MAKES men go out for
football and stick it out?
"Youth," says Derek. "The idea
of being a football star, the mon-
ey perhaps, or the special favors
one gets."I
"Being a football hero is the
great American dream, Miss
Reed added.
Yet despite its disadvantages
Derek seems to feel that football
is an integral part of a university.
"Gate receipts from large at-
tendance warrants maintaining a
team that will draw crowds," he
explained. I feel that sacrificing
60 men for the benefit of perhaps
16,000 is justifiable in football
just as it is on the battlefield."
Crawford who left right after
the game was not available for
comment but he was reported to
have said that he enjoyed Michi-
gan's first game of the year (Jan-
uary 1 (?) ) much more than yes-
terday's.

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