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September 29, 1951 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-29

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six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1951>

'U' Clarifies
Radio Policy
For Football
Home Team To
Have Full Rights
By TOM ARP
"The home school controls the
radio policy for its football games
and the visiting school has no
right or authority to make broad-
cast arrangements'on its behalf
withotit permission."
Yesterday the University sent
this statement to Michigan State
College. It was in answer to the
charge that the University is re-
sponsible for radio stations having
to pay a fee to broadcast today's
Michigan-MSC game. '
** *
THROUGH ITS college station,
WKAR, Michigan State h a d
planned to deliver a live, play-by-
play broadcast of the game to
any station in 'the state free of
charge and with all line charges
paid.
The Board in Control of Ath-
etics here had extended the us-
ual host courtesy to MSC,
whereby WKAR would have free
privileges for broadcasting the
game, according to Arthur L.
Brandon, University Relations
Counselor. That privilege did
not give WKAR the right to set
up a network of other stations,
Brandon said.

Police To Hit
IllegalSales
Football Program
Sellers Need Permit
By VIRGINIA VOSS
Unlicensed students selling ten-
cent football programs today can
expect severe fines from Ann
Arbor police, Leonard Wilcox, '52,
president of Student Legislature,
warned yesterday.
Police in the stadium area have
been instructed to crack down on
enforcement of an Ann Arbor City
Ordinance requiring vendors of
football programs to obtain an
eight dollar permit to sell on pri-
vate property. In no case will
peddling be allowed on public
streets and sidewalks on football
day.

4?U E

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*

*

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
"ROLL 'EM UP"-Harry Kipke, former 'M' All-American foot-
ball star, coach of three Big Ten champion teams, and four-term
regent performs the age-old ritual before 4000 partisan students,
at last night's pep rally.
* * * *
'M' Band Preparing Hill-Billy
.Routine for Half-Time Show

(Continued from Page 1)

After being told that it is a vio-
lation of Big Ten rules for a
member to offer to pay line
charges for football broadcasts,
MSC offered the play-by-play to
stations who would pay the costs.
This is the same policy that has
been followed by the University
for several years.
UNIVERSITY OFFICIALS gave
MSC and the radio stations of
s Michigan copies of its broadcast
policy several weeks " ago, but did
not learn that WKAR planned to
feed the broadcast of today's
game to other stations until last
Thursday.
It was only by accident that
the plans were discovered at
that time. The University then
announced that it would be ne-
cessary for the stations taking
the broadcast from WKAR to
pay a fee of $200.

r
F
t

today by more than 150 ,ales-
men.
* **
MEANWHILE, as cheerleaders
went through their final paces on
the edge of the grass-bottomed
bowl, eight radio stations and a
television company were setting
up shop in the bustling press box.
Maintenance men were bus-
ily occupied with sweeping the
long stretch of concrete which

Brandon said that the Univer-
sity will attempt to arrange
broadcasts in any area with radio
service provided the stations who
request it pay the line charges,
in accordance with the Big Ten
ruling.
Many Student
Jobs Available.
At University
By GAYLE GREENE
Anxious mates who want to
know what their girls really look
like in the morning may have
their chance. .
Disguised in a short white coat,
any male student can catch a
glimpse of her before she masks
herself to face the world and at
the same time make 75 cents an
hour-all as a bus boy in the
women's dormitories.
** *,
FOIE THOSE in need of fresh air
and exercise, raking leaves at, a
dollar an hour may be the job
with a future.
From male models for Uni-
versity life drawing classes to
men to clean out buses during
football games, there is a wide
range of part-time jobs avail-
able to students; as listed in
the Personnel Office, 3012 Ad-
ministration Bldg.
The office has reported that
there are still a great many part-
time positions available - more
this year than last.
Each student interviewed thus
far this year has received at least
two or three job leads and almost
all have obtained employment,
according to Mrs. Paul A. Gauss,
personnel interviewer.
THERE ARE meal jobs, room
jobs (which give room in ex-
change for part-time work) and
occasionally jobs which provide
room and board.'
In addition, the Personnel Of-
fice has daily requests for stu-
dents to do part-time work in;
afternoons or evenings.1
Seventy-five per cent of all
jobs handled by this service are
non-University work. Employ-
ment for women is usually hand-
led through the Office of the
Dean of Women.

Judge Warns
Students Using
FalsifiedIDs
Not even rationalization will
sway the decision of municipal
court judges in the case of stu-'
dents using false identification to
purchase alcoholic liquors.
Whether or not, philosophically,
one should be 21 years old before
being permitted to drink alcoholic
beverages, will not be considered,
Municipal Court Judge Francis
O'Brien pointed out yesterday as'
University officials joined with
him in this warning to students.
* * *
COUPLED WITH the warning
was the threat that Judge O'Brien
would not hesitate to impose fines
ranging from $50 to a maximum of
$100 and ninety days in jail, or
both, on all cases coming before
his court.
Both Dean of Students Erich
A. Walter and Dean of Women
Deborah Bacon supported the
judge in his threat to levy fines
right from the start of the school
year and added that student of-
fenders also face disciplinary ac-
tion by the University.
Dean Walter explained that
though in the past fines have been
assessed through Ann Arbor's
municipal court, students contin-
ued to be violators of the liquor
law.
"This, year it is the expectation
of the court to deal more drasti-
cally with offenders," Dean Walter
added.
HIE AND Dean Bacon joined
Judge O'Brien in emphasizing that
Michigan law forbids the sale of
alcoholic liquor to any person "un-
less he shad have attained the age
of 21 years."
They added that "the Univer-
sity obviously expects its stu-
dents to be truthful and as exact
as they can be in giving any in-
formation about themselves. Our
students are expected to carry
identification cards with them
at all times."
"There is no excuse for giving
inaccurate information about birth
dates," the statement continued.
"Alteration or falsification of such
a date must be recognized for what
it is-deliberate attempt to de-
ceive. It is a serious offense and
will be penalized accordingly."
The liquor law also states that
it is a misdemeanor for any per-
son to give or furnish any alcoholic
beverage to a minor "except upon
authority of and pursuant to a
prescription of a duly licensed
physician."
Franchot, Barbara

circles the bowl, painting num-
bers on thte seats and putting
the final touches on the play-
ing field itself.
Late in the afternoon, workmen
and pre-game spectators were
shooed from thet stadium as the
Spartan team went through an
hour's practice on today's battle-
ground.
OUTSIDE THE stadium, a few
children w e r e screaming the
familiar "Park Here" at the
droves of commercial trucks which
poured into the area. Police had
already slapped "No Parking"
signs on scores of telephone posts
near the stadium.
Nearby Ferry Field was shar-
ed by the Maize and Blue grid-
ders and the University's famed
marching band. While the Wol-
verine workout w a s closely
guarded from outsiders, the in-
tricate band formations were
watched by a small crowd of
admiring teen-agers.
At halftime today, the Band
will present a series of popular
hillbilly tunes. The Michigan
State Band will also appear on
the intermission program.
* * * '
TICKET - HUNTING may be
rough going today. Non-student
ducats may be bought and sold
at the regular price this morn-
ing at the Union lobby ticket
counter. But reported scalper
prices run in the vicinity of $20
a pair.
Michigan State ticket offici-
als said East Lansing students
who missed ordering the pre-
cious pasteboards in a campus
sale last spring were out of
luck. The entire stadium has
been sold out for more than a
month.
Celebrities will be a dime
a dozen today. Gov. G. Mennen
Williams, a host of other state
officials and several Washington
luminaries make up only a small
part of the political figures who
will watch the spectacle.
Academy Award-winner Brod-
erick Crawford will head up the
Hollywood roster. Also hailing
from'the screen world will be
John Derek and Donna Reed,
who will make a personal ap-
pearance tonight at a local the-
atre.
One celebrity won't make the
game. She is a two-year-old hei-
fer whom members of Phi Gam-
ma Delta had contracted to ap-
pear on the field to lead the new
hit tune, "Cow College Chant."
Although the cow had under-
gone a rigorous leadership pro-
gram, the University put thumbs
down.-
Student-Run
Raft, Continues
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -(Al)- The
motorized raft Lethargia resumed
its voyage down the Mississippi
River yesterday with two bachelors
and an unmarried girl aboard, all
University students.
The other member of the orig-
inal crew of four-Geraldine Gar-
cia, 24-stood on the bank and
bade it goodbye. She said she plan-
ned to catch it in a couple of days
when she recovers from nervous
exhaustion.
Five days ago the rafters pulled

THIS YEAR'S strict action is a
result of traffic congestion caused
last season by roaming vendors,
Captain Rolland J. Gainsley of
the Ann Arbor Police explained.
Following student inquiry, Wil-
cox talked to Gainsley and Athle-
tic Director I. . Crisler. Wil-
cox said that Crisler emphatically
urged students not to sell on
football territory.
The Athletic Director planned
to handle the situation this
year by distributing pamphlets,
indicating the roster of players
for each of the season's games
to students as they picked up
their football tickets.
Students may legally sell ten-
cent football programs if they
first get a Michigan State Sales
Tax License costing one dollar
from Lansing, and a transient
salesman's license for seven dol-
lars from the City of Ann Arbor.
This license requires the salesman
to state a certain street address
as his selling headquarters, City
Clerk Fred J. Looker said.
"SL will continue to work on a
solution to the student vendor's
problem. We do not consider it
a closed issue," Wilcox remarked.
AFROTC Uses
New Textbook
World Political Geography by
Prof. Russell Fifield of the poli-
tical science department has been
selected by the Air Force as the
text for their ROTC geopolitical
course.
The course is a requirement for
all AFROTC freshmen cadets and
the text will be used at the 187
colleges and universities through-
out the country where the course
is being offered.
Prof. Fifield is co-author of the
book with Edsel Peprcy, attache to
the American embassy at New Del-
hi, India. Pearcy is the geographic
editor and Prof. Fifield the poli-
tical editor of the work.
In an address before the com-
bined freshman Air Force ROTC
cadet class at the University, Prof.
Fifield stressed the political im-
plications of geography and agreed
with the Air Force that today's of.-
ficer must be well versed in this
subject because of the global mis-
sion of .the USAF.
He also applied some geopoliti-
cal ideas to the American foreign
policy of containment, pointing
out that this policy is being car-
ried out more fully in Europe than
in the Far East.
The book contains ideas on po-
litical geography as expounded by
geopoliticians in the U.S., Great
Britain and Germany. The policy
of containment, Prof. Fifield
brought out, is the exact policy re-
commended by several famous geo-
politicians in the past.
IFC To Settle
Book Accounts
Students who left used textbooks
with the IFC Book Excaange
should drop by the Exchange and
check on their books, Norm Tho-
mas, '53, manager of the exchange
announced yesterday.
Those wishing to retain title to
their books must notify the ex-
change by the end of next week,
Thomas said. Otherwise the books
become the property of the ex-
change. If the books have not been
sold they may be reclaimed or left
for sale next semester, he contin-
ued.
Thomas also requested that any
students who left books with the
exchange last spring and have
changed their address since then
notify the exchange. Cards may be
sent to the IFC Book Exchange,

Michigan Union.
The exchange will be open Mon-
day from 1 to 4 p.m. in Rm. 3-B
of the Union. It will close Tuesday.
Flashcard System
To le Used Today

WITNHOUT A BATHI NG SUIT, T O O-Vera
Marks of Frankfurt wears an evening gown before a Baden-Badea
audience after eiecton as "tiss Germany 1951" over 14 fi ialists,

,
("

N O S T R A N G E R A T T A B L E - Bambi, found
motherless in mountains, is now house-broken and permits young*.
sters to feed him at D. E. Coffman home, South Pasadena, Cal.

,,

1<

AERIAL PERCH--
Control operators will get a bird's
eye view of traffic from this new
100-foot-high tower being com-
pleted at Sky Harbor Airport,
Phoenix, Ariz.

S H A P IN C U P F OR S E S S i 0 N-Buildings being constructed for the U. N.'s General
Assembly session in Paris form aU around the fountain in front of the Palais de Chaillot. "

.

4,

4

D A RE D EV I L..-.joie Chit-
wood, Jr., 7, son of auto racing
star, does a one-leg stand on a
midget motorcycle built by his
father during an exhibition at a
New York City track.

I N P R 0 T E C T I V E C U S T 0 0 Y - "Maren," Copenhagen Zoo hippopotamus, conceals her
pride under a dour countenance as she launches her month-old offspring in public society.

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