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January 13, 1952 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-01-13

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)

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 1952

}

-Daily--Al Reid
FOUR CANINE THESPIANS EYE EACH OTHER WITH PROFESSIONAL JEALOUSY
Ca * * * * * * * *
Canine Thespians Get Temperamental

By ALICE BOGDONOFF
Yesterday Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater went to the dogs. .
Five stage struck canines growl-
ed expectantly in their respective
"dressing rooms" as they waited
to be auditioned for their first
stage appearance.
RANGING FROM "Brandy," a
hugh brown and white St. Ber-
nard, to "Mike," a small, aggres-
sive bull dog, the canine thespians
were "tryouts" for a "trot-on"
part in the Speech Department's
coming production of "The Fan,"
an 18th century comedy to open in
Lydia Mendelssohn theater Wed-
nesday.
Armed with milk bones to

keep the "actors" pacified, the
owners met with considerable
difficulty in controlling the ar-
tistic temperaments of the audi-
tioners.
"Brandy," Delta Upsilon's con-
tribution to the theater, took ad-
vantage of the actor's prerogative
-he was late and had to be coax-
ed out of his snow bank hideout
by director Prof. Hugh Morton of
the speech department.
* * *
SIGMA PHI'S six year old Great
Dane, "Rielly," lived up to the
tradition of his illustrious family
in a bid for campus prominence.
His brother is the defeated SL
candidate, "Major." Campus lead-

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er "Major" was unable to attend.
"He becomes too excited when he
sees "Rielly," his owner explained.
Director Norton stressed that
the winning dog must have per-
sonality, poise, a good disposi-
tion and a willingness to obey.
After a martial demonstration
of professional jealousy between
"Mike," the bull dog and "Rielly,"
the scene settled down long
enough for semi-final casting.
The two winners, final selection
to be made today, were "Rielly"
and "Mike."
l ~
AR-EX SOAP
for DRY SKIN
APL-EX
A super-fatted soap that
offsets the drying effects
Off wind, sun and year
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BAR
On State
At Head of North U.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Mock Trial
OKs Rural
Health Plan
By MARILYN PIMES
A verdict of not guilty was
reached yesterday at the mock
trial of "the People versus Michi-
gan Health Programs," at the
Fifth Annual Meeting of the Mich-
igan Rural Health conference.
After weighing the evidence,
Circuit Judge James R. Breakey
acquitted the programs of failing
to make adequate progress in dis-
charging their responsibilities to
the public.
THE DEFENSE witnesses repre-
sented five areas of responsibility
in health.
When charged with the lack
of rural health departments in
some areas, the defense coun-
tered by saying that the defi-
ciency affects only 8% of the
population.
Dr. A. C. Furstenburg, Dean of
the Medical School, scored for the
defense by pointing out that medi-
cal education has contributed to
improved life expectancy and that
"medical students are now getting
2,200 more hours of curriculum
than previously."
Dr. Furstenburg also noted that
the Medical School now has the
largest freshman class (204 stu-
dents) in the country.
Other defense witnesses were
Dr. A. E. Heustis, commissioner of
the Michigan Health Department;
Mrs. Margaret Price, Michigan
Youth Commission chairman; Dr.
Warren B. Cooksey, United Health
and Welfare Fund president a,nd
Dr. L. Fernald Foster, Secretary
of the Michigan Medical Society.
Attorney J. Joseph Herbert,
member of the Board of Regents
and Albert E. Blashfield, treasurer
of the State Bar, were defense
attorney and prosecuting attorney
respectively.
Organ Recital
To Be Given
Students in the School of Mu-
sic will present a festival of organ
music at 4:15 and 8:30 p.m. Wed-
nesday at Hill Auditorium.
Included in the afternoon pro-
gram will be: "Fantasia and Fu-
gue in C minor" by Bach, "Choral
in E major" by Franck, "Fugue in
E-flat Major" by Bach, the Roger-
Ducasse "Pastorale," "Prelude in
B minor" by Bach and "Litanies"
by Alain.
The evening program will fea-
ture a portion of works by Bach,
Franck's "G-ande Piece Symphon-
ique," "Les Berger" by Messiaen
and the Gigout "Toccata." The
concert will be open to the public.
Pastors To Hold
Conference Here
"Christian Frontiers in World
Tensions" will be the theme of the
13th annual Michigan Pastors
Conference to be held on campus
Jan. 21 to 23.
Approximately 500 pastors and
religious education leaders are ex-
pected to attend the gathering
sponsored by the Michigan Coun-
cil of Churches and the University
Extension Service.

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
"It's humdrum really, just hum-
drum."
That is the way Prof. Louis
Bredvold, noted scholar of the
English department, describes his
life.
* * *
BUT THE distinguished profes-
sor with the wry sense of humor
apparently has thrived on his "ev-
eryday" existence, for he has won
renown in academic circles as one
of the foremost scholars of 17th
and 18th century English litera-
ture.
And, after more than thirty
years as a University pedagogue,
Prof. Bredvold has to admit, to
him it is "stimulating."
"But its really just an ordinary
life," he insists.
* * *
THE LIFE began in 1888 back in
Springfield, Minnesota, a country
community. First stop on the aca-
demic ladder was at little Luther
College in Iowa. The professor
continued on to the University of
Minnesota, the University of Chi-.
cago and Illinois, finally landing
in Ann Arbor in 1921. A true mid-
westerner, Prof. Bredvold proudly
maintains he "is a product of the
Big Ten."
Why the professor became a
teacher he cannot exactly say.
"I made the decision very early,"
he recalled, "but I can think of
no particular moment, incident
or motive."
"I must have felt myself parti-
cularly attracted to the study of
English."
The "attraction" has sent him
up through the ranks here at Mi-
chigan, and back in 1929 won him
a Guggenheim Fellowship.
His most well-known publica-
tion, "The Intellectual Milieu of
John Dryden," came out in 1934.
"Since its publication, I've been a
Dryden specialist," he confided.
* * *
PROF. BREDVOLD currently
nurses no hobbies, although he
admits to the possession of a "run
down garden." Trees and shrubs
have grown up where the flowers
used to be, he revealed.
As for vices, relaxing or
studying, the professor has a
constant companion, his pipe,
which, he declares, provides a
a good smoke for a scholar.
"Cigarettes are a handicap. One
has to handle them so much, they
interrupt the train of thought and
lead to superficiality. A pipe fos-
ters more mature and reflective
thought," he said as he contented-
ly gave a puff on his sweet-smell-
ing instrument.
NEXT SEMESTER Prof. Bred-
vold will have a lot of time for the
"mature and reflective thought,"
for he is dropping his teaching
duties to take a leave of absence.
But the veteran scholar will not
rush away from his favorite uni-
versity. "I shall probably go to
Harvard and Washington - per-
haps some other places, but I
plan to spend some time studying
here, first.
"There are still a few books in
the library I want to investigate."
Technic on, Sale
The first issue of the Michigan
Technic for 1952 will go on sale
tomorrowi n the East Engineering
Bldg. and in the Engineers Arch.

-Daily-Malcolm ShE
PROF. LOUIS BREDVOLD AND PIPE
.. . a 'humdrum' life."

* " # #

'IT'S JUST HUMDRUM':
Bredvold Describes Life

r. 4
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Petty Thefts
Hit Campus
Five purses and a watch were
I stolen from University buildings
this week, police report.
Cash amounting to over $30 was
taken from the purses, as well as
valuable identification papers and
keys. No value was placed on the
watch, which was stolen from a
League employee, according to po-
lice.
Two thefts occurred on the third
floor of the East Medical Building.
Winifred Haanes, '52D, and Helen
Ten Brink, '52, told police that
their purses were removed from
their coats. Three handbags were
stolen as well in the Dental Clinic
from employees there.
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