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January 12, 1952 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 12,1,95Z

Famous Campus Landmarks: Potential Haven Halls?

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-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
PLYWOOD CONSTRUCTION AND STORED STAGE SCENERY MAKE TCB HAZARDOUS.

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
TAR PAPER WALL COVERINGS HAZARD THIS TOOLSHED.

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U' SISTER SCHOOL:
Exchange Plan Proposed
With Munich University

By MARGE SHEPHERD
Plans to establish a "sister" af-
filiation with the University of
Munich in West Germany through
exchange of students, professors]
and reseach information are aeing
considered by the University ad-
ministration and student leaders.
The proposal was introduced on
'U' Buildings
Fire Hazards,
nspector Says
(Continued from Page 1)
now known, according to Univer-
sity Vice President Wilbur K.
Pierpont.
In other criticisms of fire safety
conditions, Renner pointed to a
groundsmen's tool storage build-
ing behind the University Laun-
dry at 1110'E. Washington, which
is "in very poor condition and con-
stitutes a hazard to the laundry
and also the nearby Metallurgical
Research Building."
Also, the wooden floor on the
old section of the General Li-
brary "constitutes a definite and
dangerous hazard to the main
section of the building." This
defect the University will rem-
edy if the State Legislature ap-
proves a $1,310,000 program for
library improvement.
Brandon emphasized that the
University was taking every pre-
caution. He pointed to the $50,000
the University has recently invest-
ed in two new pieces of fire equip-
ment for Ann Arbor, including a
new aerial ladder.
Pierpont also affirmed that the
University would study Renner's
recommendations carefully, and
adopt as many as were practical
and could be afforded.
Block Prints
Go on Display
Block prints by su'ch well-known
American artists as Yasuo Kuni-
yoshi, Alexander Brook, Grant
Wood, Ivan Albright and William
Gropper comprise t h e exhibit
"Prints by Contemporary Artists
1'rom the Collection of Walter
Gores" now on display on the main
floor of the Architecture and De-
sign building.
Techniques of these artists,
whose major works in painting and
prints appear in museums
throughout the nation, include
lithography, etching, a n d dry
point.
Prof. Gores, of the School of Ar-
chitecture and Design, chose the
43 prints in the exhibition from
100 which he has collected in the
past twelve years.
'U' Heads To Be
On TV Program
Top University officials will ap-
pear on the 'U' Television Hour to-
morrow when the teletour will
spotlight the operation of Univer-

campus this week by Hyla Con-
verse, World Student Service Fund
education secretary. Student and
administration response to the
project w a s enthusiastic, Miss
Converse said.
UNDER THE proposed plan a
student-faculty committee would
be established to organize the af-
filiation procedure. Prof. Harold
M. Dorr of the political science de-
partment has expressed his will-
ingness to head the organizational
committee, she said.
A major part of the program
would consist of student ex-
changes financed by the indivi-
duals or through the establish-
ment of permanent exchange
scholarships.
Two such scholarships have
been set up at Yale University
which has been affiliated with the
University of Heidelberg for more
than a year.
The exchange of professors and
new research information are
other aspects of the affiliation.
Special exchange periods during
the summer would be arranged
for individuals and representatives
of campus organizations.
Further cultural contact would
be supplied through dramatic,
musical and literary groups. As
an example, Miss Converse said,
records of student concerts could
be exchanged by the "sister"
universities and played for cam-
pus groups.
The broad program of the Yale
cooperation and exchange pro-
gram includes college newspapers,
short-wave "round-tables," choral
dramatic and sports projects.
SL French Film
Continues Today
The showing of' "Children of
Paradise," a French film starring
Jean Louis Barrault and Arletty
will be continued at 8:30 p.m. to-
day at Hill Auditorium.
The movie is sponsored by the
Student Legislature Cinema Guild,
Sigma Delta Chi and UNESCO

Trio Given
'51 Awards
For Health
Three awards for outstanding
work in behalf of improved health
in the state weretannounced by
the Michigan Health Council at a
dinner-meeting last night of the
Fifth Annual Rural Health Con-
ference.
The awards, presented by State
Auditor General John B. Martin
Jr., went to:
The Livingston County Health
Council for its community health
project in 1951.
Jack Pickering of the Detroit
Times for outstanding editorial
contribution to health betterment
in 1951.
Inside Michigan magazine, for
successfully establishing a new and
vital public forum to further un-
derstanding to health and civic
progress of a free people.
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PICKERING, a University grad-
uate, did a series of articles on the
Michigan Crippled Children's
Commission, e y e surgery, and
availability of doctors.
Earlier in the day, Dr. John
K. Rodger told the conference
that the medical profession in
Michigan had met its responsi-
bility to the 22 per cent of the
population living in towns of less
than 5,000 and the surrounding
trading area.
A "Court of Public Appraisal"
will be held by the conference at
9 a.m. today in the Union Ball-
room. A jury, selected from the
audience will decide whether those
"engaged in carrying out the
health programs are failing to
make adequate progress in dis-
charging their responsibility to
the public."
T h e conference, which has
brought representatives from 94
state healthdgroups to the campus,
will end today.
Matu Conf erence
A conference on general mathe-
matics and mathematics in gen-
eral education will open at 9 a.m.
today in Rackham amphitheatre.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

The Cincinnati Symphony Or-
chestra under the baton of Thor
Johnson will give the seventh con-
cert in the Choral Union Series at
8:30 p.m. Monday in Hill Audi-
torium.
In addition to a program of well
known works, the orchestra will
present two numbers not previ-
ously heard by Ann Arbor audi-
ences. These are the overture to
"The Wasps" by Ralph Vaughan
Williams and "Symphonic Meta-
morphosis of Themes by von We-
ber" by Hindemith.
The program will also include
"Symphony No. 8" by Dvorak
and "A Night on Bald Moun-
tain" by Moussorgsky.
The Cincinnati Symphony Or-
chestra has toured every season
since 1909 and has over one thou-
sand concerts throughout thirty-
five states on its record.
The 85 musicians recently re-

turned to Cincinnati after a suc-
cessful tour of the East, climaxed
by an appearance at Carnegie
Hall.
Johnson, who took graduate
work at the University, took
over the top position in the or-
chestra in 1947. He is one of
the few Americans to attain the
conductorship of a major Am-
erican orchestra.
The Cincinnati Orchestra is also
a pioneer in the recording indus-
try, being the third symphony in
the world to make records. Cur-
rently it has the distinction of be-
ing the first American orchestra
to record for the inventors of the
full frequency-range recording
technique.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

Cincinnati Orchestra Slated
To Perform at Hill Monday

-Daily-AI Reid
PERENNIAL FIRE RISK-The Romance Languages Building has been considered a fire risk for
years, but shortage of classroom space has force d the University to keep using it. Arrow shows
locked door, exemplifying the lack of adequate exit facilities.

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LOW COST
BANK
AUTO LOANS
New Cars -
i $4.00 per $100.00
Late Model Used Cars --
$5.00 per $100.00
THE ANN ARBOR BANK
Main and Huron Sts.
State Street at Nickels Arcade 1108 South Unviersity

1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-Sacrament.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 to 5, Friday evenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Veruin.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Student,
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev.
Press, "Christ in a World of Crisis."
6:15 P.M.: Student Guild.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays, Visitors welcome.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
in Ann Arbor
736 South State Street
Wednesday, 8 P.M.
Open Class
"The Study of Life"
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister
Director Student Work, H. L. Pickerill, Mari-
lynn Paterson
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School, Junior High-Adults.
10:45 A.M.: Church School, Nursery to 6th grade.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "Sins of
the Righteous."
Student Guild: 6:00 supper and 6:45 program.
Ernest Wenrick and Neil Williams will speak
on "Who Runs History?"

Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine
The Reverend Henry Lewis, S.T.D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koonz, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
Miss Ada May Ames, Counsellor for Women
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Church School (nursery-9th grade).
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev-
erend Henry Lewis, Rector.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M., Canterbury Club: supper and speaker,
the Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain.
6:30 P.M.: High School Club.
6:45 P.M.: Seminar on Christian Living.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.
Wednesday-7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast).
.Friday-7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed
by Student Breakfast).
12:10 P.M.: Holy Communion.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Phares Steiner, Organist
10:00 A.M., Church School and Adult Group
11:00 A.M.: Services-Sermon by Edward H. Red-
man on "Liberal Religion, East & West."
7:00 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group at Lane
Hall.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "How To Outwit Evil."
Dr. Large preaching.
4:15 P.M.: Bible Study Group, Green Room.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.: Worship and Program. Dr. Wayne
Whitaker will speak on "Consumer Coopera-
lives."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily)
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D., Pastor Emeritus
John Bathgate, Minister to Students
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Seminar in Religion. Studies in the
Gospel of Mark.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr. W. P. Lemon,
preaching.
6:30 P.M.: Student meeting. Miss Dounio
Mrowra, graduate student from Lebanon, will
speak on the Near East.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The I theran Church-Misnsori Svnnd

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Council.

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TI CIH NATISSI
THOR JOHNSON, CONDUCTOR

!MPHO NY
OSCAR
LEVANT

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PROGRAM

"The Wasps" Overture ........
Vaughan Williams
Symphony No. 8, Op. 88,
in G major.......... Dvorak
A Night on Bald
Mountain ......Moussorgsky
Symphonic Metamorphosis
of Themes by
vonWeber ....... Hindemith

HILL AUDITORIUM

FRI., JAN. 18 8:30

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill & Forest Ave. Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:20 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Trinity Church-11:45 Zion Church.

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