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January 10, 1952 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1952-01-10

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1952

PAGE SIX

Second Bill
Of One Acts
OpensToday
Drama students will show the
products of their laboratory work
at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater when
they present the semester's sec-
ond bill of one act plays.
Works on the agenda include
"Sham," by Frank G. Tomkins,
a satiric comedy on modern liv-
ing, the Greek tragedy by Euri-
pides, "Medea," and a serious
character drama, August Strind-
berg's, "The Stronger." Tickets
can be obtained at the Lydia Men-
delssohn box office for 30c.
S* *
ENTIRELY produced, directed
and acted by -students, the one-
act productions are arranged to
provide interpretative freedom as
well as stage experience for the
students involved, according to
Prof. Claribel Baird, of the speech
department, one of the faculty ad-
visors.
"High men" of the current
student production group are
directors William Hadley, '52,
Yvonne LeDuc Barnes a n d
George W. Irving, Grad. To
them has fallen the main re-
sponsibility for staging and pro-
duction.
They have been aided by mem-
bers of direction classes, who have
discussed directing problems with
the three thespians and their
casts, and by the faculty advisors
who, according to Prof, Baird, al-
low the amateurs a free reign.
D I R E C T OR'S interpretations
sometimes "bother" the advisors,
the professor admitted, but the
end product is entirely the stu-
dents.
Even after the curtain comes
down tomorrow, the laboratory
session will not have ended. Next
week, directors, and production
crews will be praised or con-
demned at the ritual "critique
session" where speech students;
and faculty can present their
criticisms.
Members of the casts for the
current productions include Joel]
Sebastian, '54, Elaine Rothman,
'53, Ray Richardson, '52, and Phyl-
lis Seput, '52 Ed, in "Sham"; Sue
Ralston, '53, and Gene Bohi, '53,
will portray Medea and Creon in
"Medea" and Shirley Messing, '51,
Frances Castiner, Grad., and Hel-
en Mazneff, '53, in "The Strong-
er."
jGtP iTryouts
Preliminary tryouts for singing,-
dancing and speaking parts in the
Junior Girls' Play production will
be held from 4 to 6 p.m. today in
the League.J

THIS IS A DOG'S LIFE?
Animals Provided with Ideal Shelter

* * *

* * *

* *

Campus
Calendar
Events Today
Former Congressman Albert J.
Engel will speak to the Public Ad-
ministration Social Seminar at
8:30 p.m. in the West Conference
Room of the Rackham Building.
His subject will be "Congres-
sional Control of Bureaucracy."
Michigan Secretary of State
Fred Alger will speak to the
Young Republicans at 7:30 p.m.
in the League.
Alger is an avowed candidate
for the Republican nomination
fro governor.
* '4 *
Prof. Edgar Anderson, Engleman
Professor of botany and head of
Missouri's Henry Shaw School of
Botany will deliver a lecture on
the origin and evolution of Indian
corn at 4:15 p.m. in the Rackham
Amphitheater.
* * *
A meeting to elect officers for
the coming semester will be held
by the BEACON Association at
8 p.m. at the Union.
* *4 *4
Station WUOM will carry a re-
broadcast of Governor G. Mennen
Williams' opening address before
the State Legislature at 1 p.m.
* * *4
The Newcomers Child Study
Group of the Faculty Women's
Club will meet at 8 p.m. at the
home of Mrs. E. F. Moon.
Two recordings, "Mealtime
Troubles" and "Mrs. Green Goes
Shopping," will be played. Dis-
cussion will be led by Mrs. Moon.
Mohammed Kashis Alghita will
be honored at an International
Center tea, from 4:30 p.m. to 6
p.m. today in the Union.
Alghita, who recently received a
doctorate of physics, is returning
to Iraq to assume a professorship
of physics at the University of
Bagdad.

I By Order of the Federal Authorities

I

- MUST BE DISCONTINUED-
EVERYTHING MUST BE SOLD TO THE BARE WALLS!!

* , ,*
EMBODYING everything from
radiant-heated floors to an
isolation ward and nearly com-
pleted clinic, the new $100,000
shelter of the Washtenaw County
Humane Society provides an ideal
place where homeless animals may
receive care and be put up for
adoption.
The shelter was built last spring
with a gift from the Matthaei
Foundation, a charity fund, and
has housed more than 2,800 ani-

(A $35,000 Stock Going

for $15,000)

mals-including two lost horses
and a few tame skunks-since that
time.
Hundreds of people, many of
them school children, visit the
shelter weekly. Lots of them, like
the lad above, come to adopt ani-
mals. Others enjoy viewing such
innovations as wooden "beds" for
the kittens and self-operated
plexiglass doors which enable a
dog to venture out on an open
runway whenever he wishes.

Prospective pet adopters are
aided in their choice by a member
of the shelter's staff who discuss-
es the animal's disposition with
them and who also decides whe-
ther the person wanting the pet
will provide a pleasant home for
it.
To adopt a pet from the shel-
ter, adoption papers must be sign-
ed in which the new owner prom-
ises to take good care of his ani-
mal and to return it to the shel-
ter if forced to give it up.
After a few weeks, a check is
made, either by personal visit or
a mailed questionnaire, to find out
if the animal and his new owners
appear happy with each other. A
look at the numerous letters of
thanks received at the shelter,
however, indicates that the major-
ity of people are well-satisfied
with the results of their visit to
the "Orphanage."
'A I

The Men
Who Knox

HURRY! HURRY! HURRY! H-U-R-R-Y!
H IM UISY RYNIN SHO *e
STOCKS A RE RUNNING OUT!
S SfRl U EERA AH

1~
I

buy

when

prices

Six Speech Contest Finalists
Give Winning Talks in Forum

are
20%/"Of F

Whether you
BUY OR SELL
try FOLLETT'S
for Used Books

For the first time in spec h de-
partment history, the finahFs of
Speech 31 Semi-Final Contest
were presented as a forum yester-
U' Student Wis
NY Scholarship
Jack M. Lipson, '52, has been
awarded a $3,000 scholarship to
any New York state dental school
as a result of a competitive ex-
amination taken in October.
Hundreds competed for 14 such
scholarships given in New York
state. Lipson plans to attend Col-
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of Buffalo.

day, instead of the usual final eli-
mination contest.
The forum was held at 4 p.m.
yesterday in the Speech Depart-
ment Assembly at Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
Under the chairmanship of
John Dreher, instructor in speech,
six representatives from the twen-
ty Speech 31 classes orated their
winning speeches yesterday, af-
ter which they answered audience
questions concerning their topics.

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