100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 19, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


sI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1951

U

WORK, STUDY:
U' DP Program Adopted
By Many Other Colleges

By MARGE SHEPHERD
A plan for the resettlement of
displaced students from Eastern
European countries adopted at the
University last year is now spread-
ing to c dIle g e communities
throughout the country.
The new system, by which for-
mer students overseas are brought
to a college town on a strictly job
assurane program originated
from the requests of the students
themselves for some type of a
work-study program.
THE UNIVERSITY Displaced
Persons Committee, working with
the local Council of Churches, was
the first group to work out the
system as advanced by the World
Student Service Fund.
Under other DP plans in oper-
Clubs To Hold
Quarterfinal
TrialsTonight
Quarterfinal arguments in the
Law School Case Club's Henry M.
Campbell competitions will be held
at 7:30 p.m. today in Hutchins
Hall.
Eight teams will compete in four
different courtrooms simultane-
ously for a chance to take part in
the semifinal round next March.
** *
THE CASE '- A' will be argued
by all team rican Equip-
ment Workers L - a Local 555 v.
Campbell Gear and Equipment
Co.," concerns the validity of a
court injunction issued against a
strike and picketing carried on by
the union.
The Champlin Club, which in-
eludes Albert L. Feldman and
Al Blumrosen, will argue against
Independent Team One, consist-
ing of Donald C. Lunt and
Charles E. Oldfather; and the
Rogers Club, Robert G. Russell
and J. Kirby Hendee will meet
the Christency Club, Warren K.
Urbom and Robert S. Beach.
Other mock trials tonight will
find the Montgomery Club, James
W. Callison and James L. Weldon,
Jr., vs. Woodward Club, Alan R.
Kidston and Hyman L. Berman;
and Independent Team Two, Hugo
A. Walfred and Joseph Neath, vs.
Day Club, Walter Flickinger and
Charlie W. Wexler.
Each of the hearings, which are
open to the public, will be judged
by three members of th law school
faculty. Competing teams have
already submitted extensive briefs
covering their cases.
Tonight's hypothetical situation
finds the union appealing its case
to the state supreme court, claim-
ing that the lower court had no
power to issue an anti-strike in-
junction, that their right to picket
is protected "free speech" under
the Constitution and that any
wrongs the union committed were
under the Taft-Hartley Act and
out of state court jurisdiction.
Groups Name
Fall Pledges
Two campus professional socie-
ties have announced the members
of9their fall pledge classes for
1951.
Delta Sigma Pi, professional
business administration fraternity,
pledged Russell Baum, '53BAd,
Bob Blackwell, Grad., Remus
Boila, '53BAd, Jerry Dasso, Grad.,
Duane Dean, Grad., Roger Easton,
'52BAd, Gwain Gillespie, '53BAd,
Don Moore, '52BAd, Frank Siller,
Grad. and Vic Hampton, '54.
Pledges taken in by Mu Phi Ep-

silon, professional music sorority
for women, include Ruth Orr, Pa-
tricia Ternes, Charlotte Hoyt,
Janet Adler, Lucille Stansberry,
Nancy Bender, Joyce Raper, Marie
Louise Jensen, Carol Lyman, Joyce
Robertson and Barbara McGoey.
Also pledged were Norma Ong-
pin, arol Van Asselt, Faith Cook,
Nanette Allen, Suzanne Hendrian,
Patricia Arenz, Velma Streicher,
Mary Jo Jones and Nancy Philbin.
ichigan
Gifts
Sheaffer Fineline Pencils
with a Michigan Seal. .$1.50
Ash Trays with Michigan
Seal..............12cup
Michigan Book Ends. .. . $2.75
Michigan Scrap Books. . .$2.00
Michigan Stuffed
Animals.........$1.25 up
Michigan Pennants and
Pillows . .. . .. l prices

ation, students may come to the
United States to work, with no
provision made f o r further
study. Or they may apply for
the very few scholarships which
are available.
None of these plans meet the
needs of students who can not get
scholarships and do not want to
work as laborers for the rest of
their lives either here or in
Europe.
* * *
"THE VALUE of being an edu-
cated person in Europe means a
great deal to these people, much
more than can be realized here in
America," Bush Ohmsted, program
director of Lane Hall and advisor
of the committee pointed out.
"They cannot resolve them-
selves to the life of an unedu-
cated person, and are willing to
accept any opportunity which
will at least give them hope of
continuing their education here
in America, a chance which is
non-existent in Europe," Ohm-
sted said.
Although the DP Committee ac-
tually gives the students no as-
surance of admittance to the Uni-
versity now, by placing them in
the vicinity of the University they
have an incentive to work, to be-
come a part of the school and
have the contact with students
that means so much to them, he
said.
As an illustration of what the
Committee is doing to promote this
contact, an informal get-together
of the displaced students, other
foreign students and Americans
was held last night.
Although the plan is still in the
experimental stage, all cases have
been successful thus far and ideas
for improvement are being gained,
according to Ohmsted.
Student Raps
GradeSystem
(Continued from Page 1)
with grades and examinations en-
tirely.
One alternative presented was
having percentage grades which
would eliminate "borderline -de-
cisions and give a more equitable
account of the student's true
worth," as one professor present
put it.
But objections were raised to
this by several students who main-
tained that the same evils which
are present in the letter grade
system would eventually result.
Another alternative was having
just a passing or failing grade.
But, one student pointed out,
"This system has been tried at
other universities and after a
while students have demanded a
return' to the old system."
The meeting closed with a gen-
eral feeling that the literary col-
lege should tak' a definite stand
on grades and, above all, should
establish a consistant marking
system between departments in
the college.
SHIRTS ...
There is still time, your
shirt done to perfection
in48 hrs., just .. .22c
0z E.Wi,,iat
510 E William

Deal Closed
In Empire
State Sale
A syndicate headed by an Ann
Arbor real estate dealer and two
other men is expected to acquire
ownership tomorrow of New York's
Empire State Building, tallest#
structure in the world.
The New York World-Telegram
and Sun reported that final ar-
rangements of the long-talked-of
deal are being made by a syndi-
cate headed by Roger L. Stevens
of Ann Arbor, Alfred R. Glaney
of Detroit and Ben Tobin of Holly-
wood, Fla.
THE TRANSACTION was con-
firmed by Frank L. Garey, execu-
tor for the John L. Raskob Estate,
which held controlling interest in
the property.
Original announcement of the
proposed transaction came last
May 27. At that time, the syn-
dicate had been dickering for
about three months on the deal.
Stevens, who has played an im-
portant part in large real estate
transactions in most of the major
cities east of the Mississippi, has
sponsored the Ann Arbor Drama
Season in cooperation with the
University for the past few years.
Stevens, now in New York, was
unavailable for comment yester-
day.
The land on which the building
stands was bought by a New York
insurance company for $17,000,000.
The syndicate includes about 20
members in all, according to the
New York paper. The transaction
is scheduled to be completed
Thursday, it said.

Legislators To Thrash Out
Disputed Fraternity Issue
(Continued from Page 1)
However, the motion would be changed so that SAC, instead
of IFC, would deny recognition to any fraternity which did not
move and support removal of discriminatory clauses at national
conventions.
Both these motions incorporate to a certain extent the' study
committee's educational approach ideas, such as contact with minority
groups.
* * * *
MIKE McNERNEY, '53, will introduce a resolution declaring SL's
approval of the study committee report, and calling for the IFC to
reconsider its quick rejection. If adopted, SL would presumably
watch-and-wait till the IFC house presidents have met again.
The fourth motion will probably be a sheer postponement
move, perhaps as long as February. It may either be in the form
of a moiton to table, if the debate gets out of hand, or a simple
motion to postpone.
The now-turbulent bias issue can resolve itself in four ways:
1) A time limit, along the lines of the Human Relations Co'ma-
mittee motion.
2) The study committee report as revised by SL, with SAC
denying recognition to groups which fail to make the required

,4

:0

I

attempts at clause removal.-
3) The study committee report as it
recognition.
4) The Acacia Plan, as now set up
nothing, or if what they pass is reversed by

stands, with IFC denying
by the IFC, if SL passes
SAC or President Hatcher.

r

1u

--Daily-Jeff Pemberton
STILLE NACHT-One of the sgores of caroling groups which dotted the campus last night was the
Deutscher Verein, the German Club. Singing carols in the original German, the group spent two
freezing hours winding its way over the snow-blanketed campus.

Expected Poor Weather Adds
To Vacation Travel Problem

Transportation agencies, with a
worried eye on weather forecasts,
are preparing for an exodus of
students from Ann Arbor on Fri-
day when Christmas vacation of-
ficially begins.
With the departure of students
expected to reach its peak during
Friday afternoon and evening, all
forms of transportation are pre-
paring special services to meet the
expected heavy volume of travel.
* *~ 5.
THE WEATHER may be an im-
portant factor in the travel picture
with long-range predictions by the
Willow Run Weather Bureau in-
dicating more snowfall today and
tomorrow with near-zero weather
on Friday.
The special Wolverine Club-
sponsored student busses to Wil-
low Run will leave from in front
of the League at 11 a.m. and
1:30, 3:15 and 5 p.m.
Tickets will be on sale for 50c
from 1 to 4:30 p.m. today and to-
morrow in the Administration
Bldg. and must be purchased be-
fore boarding the busses, special
trips chairman Bob Golten, '54,
announced.
* * *
Willow Run Airport has been
open for operation throughout the
recent bad weather but many
flights have had to be grounded
because airports in other parts of
the country were not open.
A special train to New York.

being sponsored by Vulcans, en-
gineering honorary, will leave at
7:35 p.m. Friday and arrive in
New York City at 9:10 a.m. Sat-
urday with intermediate stops
at Detroit, Buffalo, Rochester
and Albany. One car of the
train will be transferred at Buf-
falo for Boston and a diner will
be added to the train at Detroit.
Three extra coaches for holders
of the special Vultan tickets will
be on the first section of "The
Michigan," which leaves for Chi-
cago at 1:11 p.m. Friday. Another
special Vulcan coach will be on
the first section of "The Twilight",
at 5:27 p.m.
Express busses to Chicago,
Grand Rapids, Cleveland, Pitts-
burgh and St. Ignace have been
scheduled and, although all
seats are reserved, additional
busses will be supplied to meet
ticket sales.
Special booths for bus tickets
are now being operated in the
Union and League.
The Union travel service has an-
nounced it will still attempt to
obtain rides for last minute-ap-
plicants.
Students who need rides or pas-
sengers may sign up in the Union
Lobby, in the East Quad old en-
trance, or call the Union offices,
2-4431, between 4 and 6 p.m. to-
day and tomorrow.
Read Daily Classifieds

Arts Theater Club
To Hold Discussion
Following tonight's performance
of Gertrude Stein's "Yes Is for a
Very Young Man," the Arts Thea-
ter Club will hold their third panel
discussion period of the fall sea-
son.

NE1T STYLES FIRST AT WILD S
Solt-Shade Blue
Flannels and Gab ardines

7

I

U-41

WHAT A SPOT
for Christmas Shopping
1'
ti nj an

Quality flannels and crisp
gabardines arriving just in
time for the holidays.
The richest-looking suits
you ever saw . . . superbly
styled and beautifully tai-
lored. These are suits of
obvious character, with
years of satisfaction woven
and tailored into them.

'j

and
7 ftg*

l)~

Children's Books, Games, Toys and Records
aFOLLETT'S

FLANNEL SUITS

Second Floor

State Street at North U.

$6500 to$725t

r

~

III

Attention
Chicago Area Students
THE INLAND STEEL COMPANY of East Chicago, Indiana,
is interested in interviewing for employment students
graduating in February or June, 1952, whose major field
of training is Accounting, Chemistry, Engineering or,
Metallurgy. Stop in at our Personnel Office, 3113 Block
Avenue, during your Christmas vacation. We will be
glad to explain our employment opportunities to you.
Our office hours are from 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday
through Friday. Should you wish to make a definite
appointment, our telephone number is Indiana Harbor
2300, Extension 255.

..e oSiven lys eirh
...ftuISto Mide and
Save the GreyhoundWY
log
VU .Low one-way fares everywhere
SAVEAG N .. .Return trip 20% Less
on round-trip tickets
IBI SAYINGS on HOLIDAY TRIPS HOME!1

A
WILD *"
State Street on the Campus

GABARDINE SUITS

I

L

aI

MULTI-
POCKET-

L

I

Business case of smooth
ginger or suntan top,
grain cowhide with con-
venient divisions.
12"x14" $9.75
Split Cowhide,
12"xl6" $3.95

'r

Ys

i

-.

/
-

From Eliza Cook
Hunger is bitter.. .
but the most accursed
of Want's fell scorpions
is thirst.
Afelaia
Yet, thirst asks nothing more

r'

BRIEF
CASE
Important papers, books
. . even overnight
clothing fit in this
roomy steel frame case.
Smooth ginger split cow-
hide.

1.4

than Coca-Cola. If you're sauntering
along or racing your motor,
start off refreshed ... have a Coke.

From Ann Arbor
BAY CITY, MICH.
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.
FT. WAYNE, INb.
SAGINAW, MICH.
MT. PLEASANT, MICH.
KALAMAZOO, MICH.
CHICAGO, ILL.
TOLEDO, OHIO
ST. IGNACE, MICH.
CLEVELAND, OHIO
PITTSBURGH, PA.
AKRON, OHIO
BUFFALO, N.Y.

One
$3.00
6.85
4.10
2.65
3.70
2.50
5.25
1.70
$.65
4.40
6.95
4.70
7.10

12.35
7.40
4.80
6.70
4.50
9.45
3.10
7.95
15.60
12.55
8.50
12.80

1.35
.80
.50
.70
.50
1.05
.30
1.70
.85
1.35
.90
1.40

16"
1 8"

size.
size.

* ' :$6.00
. . . $8.00

Round
Trip
$5.40

Extra Saving
on Round Trips
$ .60

.

Also ZIPPER NOTEBOOKS.. . $1.00 and up

r.

NO CHARGE FOR
GOLD MONOGRAMMING

*All prices
plus fed. tax

I

I

I

ia

I

__

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan