100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 26, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


4

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SETEMBER 26. 1951

Crimmage Tops
_________________* * *
utich Remains at Quarter a WWE
lidhamStillat Left Half Slot e .

Off

Le gthy

1VT'

Grid Practi ce

PIGSKIN SUCCESS:
Ex-Gridiron Aces Coach
Present Wolverine Club

Jackson Surprises Crisler, Oosterbaan

Coach Bennie Oosterbaan guid-
ed his Wolverine grid charges
through a lengthy practice session
climaxed by a 45-minute scrim-
mage behind Yost Field House
yesterday afternoon in prepara-
tion for Saturday's opener with
Michigan State.
Although the squad spent most
of its time polishing defensive
maneuvers, the two-score sideline
observers were most interested in
t h e scrimmage, w h i c h they
thought might offer some clue as
to who will be playing where in
the Maize and Blue question-mark
backfield come Saturday.
CONTRARY TO newspaper re-
ports that Captain Bill Putich will
start at the key left halfback post,
the Cleveland senior played noth-
ing but quarterback yesterday,
while Don Oldham lined up at
left half.
Rounding out the first string
backfield were fullback Tom
Witherspoon and Frank Howell
as right half. This, combination
clicked reasonably well on all
cylinders, except when Oldham
was called upon to pass.
The 170-pound junior attempt-
ed several aerials, and although
two werecompleted, one on a div-
ing catch by Lowell Perry, most
were of the wobbly, inaccurate
variety.
*~ * *
PERRY, incidentally, showed
why he is rated one of the best
WELCOME STUDENTS!
Try a Collegiate, Personality
Hair Style . , . Today!
At your service: 9 Barbers
No Waiting
The Dascola Barbers
Liberty near State 1

ends in college football. The Yp-
silanti lad, in addition to snag-
ging five or six passes, carried the
ball twice on the end-around play,
and both times he sped for touch-
downs.
He also threw a couple of
blocks that drew compliments
from the spectators and team-
mates.,
Putich completed a large per-
centage of his passes from quar-
terback to Perry, end Fred Pick-
ard, and Howell, all against a
scrub defense, however.
WHEN THE SECOND team took
over, the most encouraging play
came from quarterback Don Zan-
fagna and a freshman left half,
Don Eaddy of Grand Rapids, who
demonstrated that he can throw
as well as run.
Zanfagna hit Leo Schlict sev-
eral times in succession with
passes on one march to the
goal line, and the stocky signal
caller rarely missed completing
his tosses to other receivers.
Other members of the second
backfield were-Don Peterson, full-
back, and little Wes Bradford at
right half.
PUTICH AND ZANFAGNA var-
ied their formations from single
wing to T to double-wing, with
most emphasis, as usual, on the
single wing, despite recent specu-
lation that Michigan State is
primed to stop it.
Oregon State, in losing to MSC
last week, was unable to gain with
the single wing, but the Pacific
Coast team went great guns using
a second-half T attack.
Defensively, two standouts were
end Russ Osterman and guard
Don Dugger, a brother of Jack
Dugger, All American end at Ohio

By JOHN JENKS
Despite the scads of publicity
Michigan football has received in
the last five years, it's really amaz-
ing how so many of the University
students know so little about the
men directly responsible for the
pigskin. successes-the coaches.
Take H. O. (Fritz) Crisler, for
instance. Most students have a
hazy notion that Crisler is head
man in the athletic department,
and that he was tremendously suc-
cessful as a mentor the last few
years of his coaching career.
BUT FEW realize that Crisler
attended the University of Chi-
cago, where he starred in football
under Alonzo Stagg, played bas-
ketball and baseball as sidelights,
and graduated with high scho-
lastic honors.
Fewer still know that Crisler
coached at Minnesota and
Princeton before coming to
Michigan in 1938, and that his
lifetime record shows 116 gamesj

won, 32 lost and nine tied.
Besides being athletic director,
Crisler is chairman of the NCAA
rules committee. He is credited
with inaugurating the two pla-
toon system in 1945.
BENJAMIN Gaylord Oosterbaan,
Michigan's head mentor, needs no
introduction, as virtually every
student possesses a thumbnail
sketch of his achievements. But
for those who don't, here's the
straight scoop:
After a highly successful ath-
letic career in Muskegon Heights
High School, during which time
he was everything in everything,
Bennie camne to Michigan to
further his sporting knowledge.
Like Crisler, Oosterbaan played
football, basketball and base-
ball, concentrating on the first-
named.
He was quite good at it, too. Soj
good, in fact, that he was named

LOWELL PERRY
... great expectations

Continued from Page 1)
that their chances of making the
varsity are extremely small."
* x
PARTICULAR criticism is dir-
ected toward what Jackson de-
scribes as artificial team spirit,
which he feels is manufactured to
bridge the gap among players
caused by a high degree of special-
ization at various positions in the
lineup.
He further derides the idea
that football can be justified for
its tendencies toward character
building. He visualizes many
present-day players . being put
on the spot by coaches and pub-
licity men who build players up
in the public eye only to suffer a
shameful letdown when they fail
to become star performers.
Jackson outlines the case of a
Michigan halfback who suffered
such an experience last season.
That case, he claims, demonstrates
how players are "first deluded into
thinking that they are great and
that football is great; then they
are used by the system and finally
discarded with at best nothing to
show but a scrapbook full of re-
dundant and inaccurate clippings."
THE LINEMAN-author's point-
ed accusations stirred considerable
interest in various quarters on
campus yesterday.
At a staff meeting of football
coaches, Oosterbaan perused the
article quietly and carefully. He
simply stated that Jackson "is
entitled to his opinion, but I
believe it is an isolated one."
"If many of the charges were
true," Oosterbaan continued, "I
would not be a part of this staff."
Meanwhile, Athletic Director H.
0. "Fritz" Crisler was also getting
his first look at the completed
story in his office. His initial re-
action was that "knowing Al as
an exhibitionist and sensationalist,
W olverine
Football
Schedule

I am not surprised at anything hej
might write."1
LIKE OOSTERBAAN, Crisler al-
so thought that other team mem-
bers "would have honest differenc-
es of opinion with Jackson on the
whole matter."
"I can't understand why he
remained out for football feel-,
ipg that way," said Crisler.
He concluded his remarks with
the thought that "destructive ar-
The University Golf Course
will be closed on the days of all
home football games.
Golf Course Management
ticles usually find their way into
print."
It was only last New Years Day
that Jackson himself stood up in'
the dressing room between halves

of the Rose Bowl battle to deliver
a fight talk to his teammates.
AT THE TIME Michigan was
trailing California, 6-0, and many
observers later credited Jackson
with having stirred the Wolver-
ines to come from behind and win
the game which he now terms the
"biggest farce connected with big
time football.
Jackson is now working in Ann
Arbor with his father in the con-
struction business.
He stated yesterday that if he
were asked to find a substitute for
the game as it is today he would
favor the relegation of sports to
an intramural status much the
same as they are in England.
Under Jackson's proposal, inter-
collegiate games would be held to
a minimum of one or two each
year.
1'

1I

f a y _ tr

I

Morgan, MSC Tackle, Suffers
Broken Leg; Lost for Season
_______ N

I

EAST LANSING-(OP)-There is
a big, gaping hole in the Michigan
State line today.
Biggie Munn's football defense
was dealt a major blow when Jack
Morgan, the 225-pound, six foot
two tackle from Detroit, broke his
leg in a scrimmage session Mon-
day afternoon.
** *
MORGAN, A SENIOR, was a
letterman last year and also was
one of the big morale boosters on
the squad. He won the "oil can
award" in 1950, annually given
to the squad humorist.

Big, fast and experienced,
Morgan played with the defen-
eivs unit through most of the
Oregon State game.
He went down in a pileup Mon-,
day afternoon and had to be
helped from the field. X-rays dis-
.closed he had fractured the fibula
(small bone) in his right leg be-
tween the ankle and the knee.
** *
TEAM PHYSICIAN Dr. Charles
F. Holland said Morgan would be
in a cast for about four weeks and
could not be expected to play the
rest of the season.

State several seasons ago.

/

}

FRITZ CRISLER
,successful ex-mentor
to the All-Time team picked by
the Associated Press. Following
his graduation in 1928, Oosterbaan
served in various coaching capaci-
ties until his appointment as head
coach in "1948. "
HIS RECORD during the last
three years has been sensational.
Each time he steered his aggrega-
tion to the top, only having to
share the crown with arch rival
Ohio State on one occasion. If the
laws of probability and chance
have any merit in Big Ten foot-
ball, Bennie's next big winner will
come sometime in the 1980's.
After Oosterbaan the coach-
ing staff drops into complete
obscurity as for as the average
student is concerned. Jack Blott
turns out great lines year after
year minus the recognition he
deserves.
Blott was an All-American cen-
ter in 1923 and also was proficient
in the art of dropkicking. In the
two tenures he has experienced at
Michigan he has turned out no
less than eight lines for title
winners.
George Ceithaml and Bill Or-
wig are other Michigan grads who
stayed on to coach football. Ceith-
ami handles the backfield men,
while Orwig tutors the ends. The
latter is a colleague of Ooster-
baan, playing football and bas-
ketball from '27-'29.
Wally Weber, freshman coach
and all-around handyman, is the
owner of the finest vocabulary of
anybody in the coaching profes-
sion.

Sept. 29
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 20
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 10
Nov. 17
Nov. 24

Miclligan State
Stanford
Indiana
Iowa
Minnesota
Illinois
Cornell
Northwestern
Ohio State

The rich lustre and long wear of this fine Taylor
Made shoe makes it ideal for college wear. Drop
in soonand let us show you our large line of
Taylor Made shoes.
The style above is
$1495 .
Other styles range from 12.95 to 19.95
W.A NTY & REULE

Home
Home
Home
Away
Home
Away
Away
Home
Home

Downtown-210 * Main St.

Phone 2-5102

I

m

0_

B'

F -

rer Preview o Ar Fall!
SSEE THE COMPLETE ARRAY OF NEW

EDITORIAL
TRYOUT
MEETING

Y
t,,

I

MONDAY

TO
STUDENTS'
WIVES
If you are a
former
TELEPIONJE
OPERATOR
and would like to work
while your husband
attends the University,
come in and see us.1

11

4

UPM.

I

Busy days ahead. . time to replace that old pen that may
cause trouble. The Parker Preview for Fall offers your all-

6
00

fI -InT T 1*T11AT M T"*AT T T1T-T /O" t"''1 T /0"0"\ T ( I I

I

SIIe

I

11

11

I

®i se

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan