100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 15, 1951 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SA"T"URDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1951

PAGE FOUR SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 19~i1

PROFESSOR EXTRAORDINAIRE:
Duey Recalls Colorful Past

OSU Ends

Research Center Interprets
Results of Fraternity Study

c

* * *

By CARA CHERNIAK
He's called "Fabulous Phil" and
it's a name that fits him.
For Prof. Philip Duey of the
School of Music is not an ordinary
professor-in fact being on a Uni-
versity faculty is a relatively new
experience for a man who has
been radio performer, night club
entertainer, broadway and vaude-
ville actor and concert artist.
YOUNGESt OF a family of
eleven, Duey was born in 1901 on
a farm in Macy, Indiana. His
whole family was musical, and in
fact formed their own band, di-
rected by their father.
"I can still remember the first
time I ever sang" Duey recalled
with a smile. "There I was, not
more than four years old, sing-
ing on a bandstand in the vil-
lage square-and scared silly!
The young singer was brought
up in true rural style, educated in
a one-room country school-house.
Later he attended Indiana Uni-
versity where he graduated in
1924 with both a Phi Beta Kappa
key and the highest honor given
for extra-curricular activities.
AFTER RECEIVING a master's
degree in voice Duey got "the big-
gest thrill yet"--a' scholarship to
Juilliard School of Music in New
York.
"But the 'peak' was reached," he
declared, "when I received my PhD
degree from Columbia University."
It was while he was attend-
ing Juilliard that Duey first be-
gan working in Broadway shows,
and more particularly, in radio.
At this time Duey was also a
"crooner" in various New York
night clubs. His favorite occupa-
tion, however, and the one which
took up most of his time was
radio-"a more stable profession,"
Duey said.
For more than 5000 radio broad-
casts Duey did all types of sing-
ing, from the most popular tunes
to opera.
* * * 4
EVEN THE "Hollywood bug" hit
Duey and he was asked to go to
California to appear in the movies.
"But I was too conservative to
give up a bird in the hand in New
York to catch a bird in the bush
in Hollywood," Duey said, "so I
refused the offer."
"And I've never been sorry."
Besides all this, Duey has ap-
peared in vaudeville; two movie
shorts for a well-known movie
company, and has made hundreds
of records, some with Paul White-
man's band.
Within the last two years he has
written a book on the history of
Bel Canto (beautiful singing),
Holiday Airport
Buses Scheduled
Tickets for the Wolverine Club

which describes the soloistic art
of singing in the 17th and 18th
centuries in Italy.
HIS FIRST meeting with Ann
Arbor and the University was 20
years ago -when he appeared be-
fore a packed audience in Hill
Auditorium with the Revelers
Quartet. Duey sang with the
group for two years and says of
tnem almost longingly, "There
never has been another quartet
quite like them."
Duey married "the girl from
back home." His wife grew up
less than half a mile from
Duey's farm. Their son, James,
ahd daughter, Barbara, both are
attending the University. Nei-
ther of them have chosen to fol-
low their father's footsteps in
the music field.
Settling down in a college town
had always been the "long-range
goal" of the Duey family, and so
in 1947 they came to Ann Arbor
to make their present home here.
First, however, Duey went to Co-
lumbia University where he re-
ceived two more degrees.
* *
TO THE MEN'S Glee Club,
which he conducts, Duey is more
than just a professor, or their con-
ductor. To them he's "Fabulous
Phil" and they have reason for
calling him that.
"He's the closest I've seen to
genius," Dick Fran', president
of the Glee Club, said enthusi-
astically.
"He can talk on any subject for
hours, no matter whether he
knows anything about it or not.
In all my four years with the
Glee Club I've never heard him
talk on the same subject twice."
4 *
"HE HAS the knack of puttingj
us at ease in any situation. "If
there's tension before a concert,
he can relieve it with a joke. And
if we're not serious enough, one
word from him will put us in the
right frame of mind."
Duey's favorite pastime with
Glee Club men outside of sing-
ing is playing poker.
But after an out-of-town con-
cert Duey and many club members
like to sit around informally and
sing anything that comes to mind.
Perhaps Duey's whole philoso-
phy can be summed up in his own
favorite quotation from John
Reed, who said of Charles Town-
send Copland, a Harvard profes-
sor, "He made us want to do
nothing unworthy."
Taylor House Gets
Laing as Advisor
Prof. Lionel Laing of the politi-
cal science department was in-
ducted as faculty associate to Tay-
for House, South Quadrangle, in a.
short ceremony Thursday evening.

'Gag Rule'
Controversy
A "further interpretation" has
ended the three-month contro-
versy over the "gag rule," at Ohio
State, the New York Times report-
ed yesterday.
The "solution" came after their
Faculty Council endorsed the in-
terpretation by the Board of Trus-
tees that hereafter professors
should be responsible for speakers
brought to the campus.
"In case of doubt," the interpre-
tation said, "the faculty member
shall consult with his colleagues
and cause the matter to be refer-
red to his appropriate department
chairman and dean to the presi-
dent's office for advise and ac-
tion."
The interpretation also called
for a nine-member committee on
evaluation to assist
The old interpretation held that
the names of all speakers invited
to appear on the campus must be
submitted to Pres. Bevis' office for
approval.
Cast Chosen
For 'Players'
Aext Dramna
Pat Skinner, '52, has been se-
lected to play Joan of Arc in the
Student Players production of
Maxwell Anderson's "Joan of Lor-
raine."
James E. Brodhead III, '52, will
have the male lead as Jimmy Mas-
ters, the director of the "play
within a play" and the Inquisitor
who condemns Joan to death.
Twenty-one others have been
chosen to perform in the play,
which will have a four perform-
ance run in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre beginning February 20.
For those interested in working
on the production staff of "Joan!
of Lorraine," a meeting of all pres-
ent or prospective crew members
is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. tomor-
row in the League.I

(Continued from Page 1)
But realistically, there is
usually some "giving up" or
"being coerced" for everyone in
arriving at a satisfactory solu-
tion in smch an issue. Some must
give up the idea that the solu-
tion can be arrived at tomorrow.
Others must accept that majori-
ty sentiment should prevail, or
must accept that the facts of
their case are weaker than the
other side.
But the majority must always
help the minority make the neces-
sary change rather than attack it
for being "in the wrong."
* * *
LEADERS of the campus organ-
izations which have been con-
cerned with this problem, were in
agreement on one point-the sur-
vey tended to back each one up on
its individual programs.
IFC president Jack Smart
pointed out that the fraternities
do recognize the existence of a
problem-and have designed a
policy "to meet this problem in
the most constructive manner."
"'This unique, IFC-sponsored
survey's findings coincide with the
action we have taken and will con-
tinue taking," Smart declared,
noting that several fraternities
have already been successful in
eliminating bias clauses.
A "forced" change creates a
negative attitude towards discri-
mination, and is not consistent
with our policy of positive educa-
tion and assistance towards this
problem," he said.
ON THE OTHER hand, SL pres-
ident Len Wilcox asserted that
the University community- must
draw the line somewhere on dis-
crimination. Recognizing that dis-

criminatory practices are bad, the
campus may be forced to employ
"coercive" means to work towards
their elimination.
'Although this "coercion may
hurt some who are now ready to
change their admission policies,"
he said, there are many other
houses a long ways from any
real change of heart in this.
These must be pushed along, he
said.
Bill McIntyre, fraternity presi-
dent, former legislator, and an
IFC representative on the study
committee, emphasized that the
survey in itself is no solution.
"If the fraternities consider the
survey as an end in itself, instead
of using it as just a starting point,
then any potential value in the
survey will have been lost."
Bev Clarke, president of Pan-
hellenic Association, felt that a
similar survey might be worth-
while for the sororities. The Re-
search Center had previously in-
dicated their regret that the pro-
ject had not encompassed more of
the campus.

Campus
calendar
EVENTS TODAYt
BEACON MEETING-The Bea-
con association will hold its weekly
discussion at noon in the League.
EVENTS TOMORROW
CHOIR BROADCAST - The
Women's Choir and the Tudor
Singers will present a program of
special Christmas music on the
University Television Hour at 1
p.m. over WWJ-TV, channel four.
COMING EVENTS
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
--An important meeting of the
International Students Association
will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday
at the International Center. The
formation of a new ISA constitu-
tion will be discussed.
Tryouts for G&
To Begin Today
Tryouts for the spring semester
Gilbert and Sullivan Society pro-
duction, "Princess Ida," will be
held from 1 to 5 p.m. today and
from 1 to 6 and 7 to 11 p.m. to-
morrow in the League.
Rehearsals for the show will not
begin until February.

Concert at Lloyd
The second "Pop" concert of
the semester will be held at2:30
p.m. tomorrow at Alice Lloyd Hall
by the University Concert Orches-
tra.

RONSON
LIGHTERS
ill gifts purchased
from
arcade jewelry
shop
Ann ,Abe, M k$6
ae red Jewe rs Americanemsoefy
ENGRAVED,
no additional charge
(Engraving same
day on request)
Read Daily Classifieds

..

r
t

.,
x

PROF. PHILLIP DUEY

I

Cliairmen Named
Mort Freedman, '53, and Mary}
McNulty, '52, have been named as
co-chairmen of Religion in Lifea
Emphasis Month slated to beginj
Feb. 26.'
Read Daily Classifieds

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Subject-God the Preserver of Mon.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339
South Main Street where the Bible and all
authorized Christian Science literature may be
read, borrowed, or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sun-
days and holidays from 11 to 5, Fridayevenings
from 7 to 9, and Sunday afternoons from 2:30
to 4:30.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Mnister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship (Nursery for chil-
dren). Sermon: "Christmas Is a Gift."
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
Student Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Marilynn Paterson, Assistant

r4
TYOUTS
k for
Gilbert and Sullivan
"Princess Ida"

. !
I

c ol) s

Saturday, Dec. 15 . . . 1-a P.M.

sponsored special busses for Dec. T
21 to Willow Run Airport will be The first such associate to be
on sale from 1 to 4:30 p.m. next eected in the new men's dormi-
week at the Administration Bldg. tory, Prof. Laing will act as an in-
Scheduled to accommodate Va- formal adviser and counselor to
cation-bound students, the busses the residents of the house.
will leave at 11 a.m., 1:30, 3:15 and He was presented with a perma-
5 p.m. in front of th League. No nent meal ticket by the house
tickets will be sold on the busses. council at the after-dinner recep-
Bus fare will be fifty cents. tion.
Ii

Sunday, Dec. 16 ... 1-5 P.M.
PrmCiples: Sunday, Dec. 16 ... 7-11 P.M.
League, ABC Room
NO REHEARSALS UNTIL NEXT SEMESTER

- I

I

11iI

0O
¢40.
q*°
0
0'

I'

CHAMPAGNE!
Domestic and imported Wines
and Champagne, a selection of
14 different brands. Carbon-
ated wines for making cham-
pagne punch.

O CURSED SPITE!
THE TIME AIN'T RIGHT!
BUT T'IS NO PLIGHT
'CAUSE GENERATION WILL BE
OUT MONDAY, DECEMBER 17,

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leosard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Leonard
Verduin.
7 :30 P.M: Evening Service, Rev. Veruin.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill & Forest Ave. Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday--9:20 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Trinity Church-10:45 Zion Church.
5:30 P.M.: LSA Meeting.
7:00 P.M.: Christmas Program.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D., Pastor Emeritus
John Bathgate, Minister to Students
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
Sermon Topic: "Watchers of the Sky" Advent
Sermon.
Westminster Guild program: 5:30 "Christmas
East." Dinner and worship program.
THE VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center Chapel
Willow Run
Reverend Blaise Levai, Pastor
Sunday, December 16th, 1951
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Children's Christ-
mas Program.
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
7:00 P.M.: Vesper Service. Christmas Music by
the Fellowship Choir.
THE SALVATION ARMY
220 East Washington . .. Phone 8353
Sunday Services
10:00 A.M. Sunday School
11:15 A.M.: Morning Worship Service"
6:30 P.M.: Young People's Service
7:45 P.M.: Evening Worship Service
Wednesday Evening
7:45 P.M.: Mid-week Prayer Service
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev.
Press "When God Comes."
6:15 P.M.: Student Guild. Christmas program.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETINGLane Hall
11:00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
and The Episcopal Student Foundation
North Division at Catherine
The Reverend Henry Lewis, S.T.D., Rector
The Reverend Ellsworth E. Koonz, Curate
The Reverend Bruce H. Cooke, Chaplain
Miss Ada May Ames, Cunsellor for Women
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).
11:00 A.M.: Church School (nursery-9th grade).
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev-
erend Henry Lewis, S.T.D., Rector.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club. Supper and speak-
er: The Reverend Kenneth M. Mann; topic:
"The Incarnation As It Concerns My Church."
6:30 P.M.: High School Club.
6:45 P.M.: Seminar on Christian Living.
8:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.
Wednesday, 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast).
Friday, 7:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by
Student Breakfast). 12:10 P.M.: Holy Com-
munion.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Phares Steiner, Organist
10:00 A.M.: Adult Group qnd Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship - Sermon by
Edward H. Redman, "Civil Liberties Today."
7:00 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group assembles
at Lane Hall to join SR.A. carollers.

A.

STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 P.M. supper at
Guild House, followed by a Carol Sing.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Y. M. C. A. Auditorium
G. Wheeler.Utley, Minister
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning service.
7:00 P.M.: Sunday evening service.

A

ra

rV
.t
x.

the

UNLIMITED QUANTITIES TO FIT ANY NEED
THE BEER VAULT
303 Nrth Fifth Ave.
Across from the Farmer's Market

AND THIS WILL M
PLEASURABLE REA
MONDAY NIGHT.

B V tt

{
t
h
I
i
-. ..........."fi 44.
K.y ~'' W

.. ..,,tt... ".r...''..
Awl-

AKE
DING
) .

THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
in Ann Arbor
736 South State Street
Wednesday, 8 P.M.
Open Class
"The Study of Life"

I

r

I

Russian Ukranian ORTHODOX CHURCH
Greek Orthodox Church, North Main Street
Rev. Nowecke
Service at 12:30.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:30 A.M.: Service, with Holy Com-
munion. Sermon by the pastor, "Joys of Christ-
mas."
Sunday at 5:30 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper.
Sunday at 6:30 P.M.: Christmas Candlelight Song
Service, featuring Chapel Choir. Public cor-
dially invited.
Wednesday, 7 to 11:30 P.M.: Pastor and Mrs.
Srko, nc'annu Ial ("Christn"r c'ns oen, ie

r: >.,

fllerie rx~rj f fC/4vertjfmaj. . Z.. ......

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL. CHURCH

I

it

ii

11

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan