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December 13, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

d

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1951

ORDAN'S TESTIMONY:
Harvard Grid Coach
Defends College Sports
WASHINGTON-(P)-College sports-and the men who play
hem-were staunchly defended yesterday by Lloyd P. Jordan, football
Dach at Harvard.
Jordan, who is president of the National Football Coaches Asso-
ation, was here to testify before the college presidents named by the
merican Council on Education to find out what is wrong with sports.
THE MEETING was closed, but Jordan met with reporters later.

SL Socializes

Bias Survey
Helps Change
Greek Ideas
(Continued from Page 1)
After dividing the houses into
three groups, "admit," "don't ad-
mit," and "no single opinion," it
was found that more changes took
place in the houses that had no
single opinion than in those with a
definite opinion to begin with.
* * *
THE TURNOUT for the meet-
ings, which were held during the
spring of 1951, varied greatly as
did the amount of discussion in
each house, but members general-
ly showed a keen interest in the
Information.
Questionnaires were passed
out about a week before and
about two weeks after the feed-
backs. Fortunately, from the
scientific standpoint, about one-
fifth of the men missed these
pmeetings. Therefore the staff
was able to compare the men
who were present with those
who were absent and get an idea
whether attending the meeting
had helped to change the man's
:opinion.
Members expressed surprise at
finding out that there is as much
sentiment in their house towards
changing membership policy as
was indicated. This suggested that
before the feedbacks they hadn't
discussed the problem much
among themselves.
(NEXT-The Attitudes of the Jew-
sh Fraternity members.)
Cooke To Tall
At Convocation
Alistair Cooke, chief American'
correspondent of the Manchester
Guardian, will be the main speak-
er at the University's Twenty-
ninth Annual Honors Convocation
to be held April 25, it was announ-
ced yesterday.
British-born, Cooke acts as com-
mentator for the British Broad-
casting Company and also broad-
casts the weekly program, "Letter
to America."
Dean of Students Erich A. Wal-
ter, chairman of the convocation
committee, revealed the appoint-
ment.
Military Course
Excuse Granted
Robert O. Winder, an Ann Ar-
bor High School senior who last
month refused to take the school's
required military orientation pro-
gram was virtually excused from
taking the course last night.
Provided Winder's parents re-
quest formally that their son be
excused from the disputed course,
Winder will be allowed to make up
the required hour in another sub-
ject, the Board of Education decid-
ed.

When askel if college sports
needed "cleaning up," Jordan
said:
"Not necessarily. There are some
corrections needed, of course. I
don't think it's as bad as it's made
out to be."
AS FOR the boys who play the
sports, Jordan said:
"There are a lot of good ath-
letes who are fine boys. I don't
mean fine athletes; I mean fine
boys. It's a shame to have the
criticisms heaped on these fine
boys because of a few."
Jordan's views of what should
be done.on college sports:
Bowl games-a matter for indi-
vidual schools to decide, the
coaches think. (Speaking for him-
self, though, he's against them.)
Spring practice-controlled but
not abolished altogether.
Recruiting-coaches feel there's
no reason why they can't sell their
institution to a youngster in the
same 'Way that any other teacher
can. "I think each institution
must work out its own salvation,"
Jordan said.
Athletes-they should be treat-
ed like any other students; they
should take the same courses, and
keep up with their classes.
s* * *
Badgers Hit
Head Coach's
SalaryHike
The Wisconsin Board of Regents
came under fire Tuesday from the
University of Wisconsin Daily Car-
d~nal for giving head footbal
coach Ivy Williamson a salary hike
which will put him in a bracket
second only to Wisconsin's Presi-
dent E. B. Fred.
Scoring the hike as a "gross dis-
tortion of values," the student
paper noted that Williamson's new
$14,000 salary, effective Jan. 1,
"may well be the only sum which
will keep a highly competent
coach, as Williamson certainly is,
at the university."
"If the choice must be made
between either evaluating the
football . coach at a level second
only to the university president or
taking the chance of losing a high-
calibre coaching staff and with it
Wisconsin's hopes for athletic ac-
claim, we had hoped the university
would have chosen the latter," the
editorial said.
Assessing Course
The Institute of Public Admin-
istration and the Extension Serv-
ice will continue their sixth annual
Short Course for Assessing Offi-
cers at 9:30 a.m. today in the Un-
ion.
The sessions, attended yesterday
by 125 state and municipal assess-
ors, will end tomorrow.

'U' TV Hour
Rated High
By Detroiters
Education via television is more
popular than entertainment in
Detroit, according to the latest
Pulse Survey.
The University Television Hour
on WWJ-TV is rated ahead of al
other programs telecast in Detroit
between 1 to 2 p.m. on Sundays,
their latest research shows. Pulse
Survey is a nation-wide radio and
television research organization.
Competing with programs on
sports and an adventure series,
the Telecourse has an average
rating of 8.7. The second most
popular program is three points
behind. Telecourse viewing audi-
ence is estimated at between
80,000 and 100,000.
These statistics refute the opin-
ion originally expressed by Prof.
Wilbert J. McKeachie of the psy-
chology department, who teaches
the telecourse on human behavior.
When the educational series was
instigated, he predicted, "There
will be a conflict between educa-
tion and art, and I believe enter-
tainment will win out."

By Order of the Federal Authorities

A

--M ST BE ISCONTIN UE D

-Daily-Bruce Knoll
SL PUNCH-Phyllis Kaufman, SL secretary, pours a cup of
punch for Dean of Students Erich A. Walter who has just com-
pleted a tour of the newly decorated SL Building with president
Len Wilcox. More than 60 faculty members and student leaders
attended the Legislature's first open house yesterday at their
quarters at 122 S. Forrest.
DEMANDS ATOM BAN:
Vishinshy Avows Russians
WillJoin in Disarmament

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Id

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PARIS-(IP)-Andrei Y. Vishin-
sky gave implicit assurances yes-
terday that Russia will take part
in the work of a new 12-nation
disarmament commission expected
SL Advisory
ServiceOpen
Student experts under SL's stu-
dent advisory program will be
on hand from 3 to 5 p.m. today in
Rm. 1209 Angell Hall to help any
student wanting information on
courses for next semester.
Representatives from every de-
partment in the literary college,
the School of Business Adminis-
tration and education school wlil
be on hand to give information.
Experts in pre-professional cours-
es will also be present.
This is the last time the student
experts will hold advisory sessjons
until after Christmas vacation.

to 'be created by the UN General
Assembly.
At the same time the Soviet for-
eign minister demanded that the
UN ban atomic weapons forthwith
and charged the United States was
rejecting Russian disarmament
proposals in order to gain time for
stockpiling bombs.
"Who has atomic weapons?"
Vishinsky asked in a 75-minute
speech to the Assembly's political
committee. "The United States
and the Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics. You (the United States
and the West) do not want to ac-
cept our proposals because you
want to gain time to stockpile,
stockpile and stockpile atomic
bombs.
"We can also stockpile atom
bombs, but we do not want to do
this as we have no aggressive in-
tentions against anyone, not
against the United States or any
other country."

CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMETRY
(Nationally Accredited)
An outstanding college serving
a splendid profession.
Doctor of Optometry degree in
three years for students enter-
ing with sixty or more semester
credits in specified Liberal Arts
courses.
REGISTRATION FEB. 25
Students are granted profes-
sional recognition by the U. S.
Department of Defense and
Selective Service.
Excellent clinical facilities.
Athletic and recreational activi-
ties. Dormitories on the campus.
CHICAGO COLLEGE OF
OPTOMETRY
350 Belden Avenue
Chicago 14, Illinois
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

,

EVERYTHING MUST BE SOLD TO THE BARE WALLS!!
$50,000 Stock at Savings up to 50 '
SALE STARTS THURSDAY at 9 A.M.

I

(Just in Time to STRETCH YOUR

CHRISTMAS

DOLLARS.)

i

Men's White $1.25
Boxer Shorts
59c pr. 6 pr. $3.10
$1.75 Value Polo
SHIRTS
69c ea. 3 for $2.00
$2.50 Value Port Wool
ong Drawers
1.49 ea. 3 for 4.25
Long Sleeve, $2.50 Value
Port Wool
Undershirts
1.49 ea. 3 for 4.25
All Wool Navy Blue
Stocking
CAPS .59
$2.95 Wool Ear Flop
Winter
CAPS 1 .29
Fleece Lined Cotton
Zip Front or Button Front
$3.95 Value
Sweaters $1.99
All Oxfords
Cut to
$4.88 r.
Values to $10.00

SE NSATIONAL
SPECIALS
($3.95) Hunting
KNIFE .........49c
($1.98) Scout
AX E 49c
($1.50) Leather
BELTS .. ... 49c
($1.49) Imported
RAG RUGS...66c ea.
($1.50)
FLASHLITES .66c ea.
($3.98) Surplus
SUN GLASSES 99c pr.
(59c) Jersey Brown
GLOVES 935cpr
3 p r. 99c
(35c) White
Handkerchikfs 15c ea.
$1.50 doz.
SWEAT SOX
All Wool or 50% Wool
44c pr. 6 pr. $2.40
Cushion Sole, White or Black
SOX ..... $2.40 doz.
Values to $1.25pr.
Dress SOX $3.75 doz.
4-Buckle and Zipper
GALOSH ES
$4.88 Pr.
Goodyear, $6.95 Value

All
JACKETS
Cuat to $8.88
Values to $22.50

Officer's Style $10.00
Trench Cats
$9.99
Suntan or Grey
PANTS
$2.88 pr.
Army Surplus
Raincoats $4.88
$3.95 Plastic
Raincoats $1.49
Grey, Blue, Red,
Yellow or White
Sweat Shirts
1.59 ea. 2 for 3.00
Worth 2.50 each

.

;I

x

MEM-DAY
TODAY
M-ichigan
E-nsian
M - --- --
WHAT IS IT?
BE ON THE DIAGONAL
- AT f" kI AMn Cqn

ii

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$10.00 All Nylon
JACKETS
$4.88 ea.

A

AND 1001 OTHER SENSATIONAL BUYS!!

I

11

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FIXTURES FOR SALE

F

STORE LEASE AVAILABLE

ANN ARBOR SAYS: "GOODBYE FOREVER" TO:

''

III

III

VII

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